Category Archives: Bassoon

A musical thank-you to the Mead Witter Foundation; Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Winners Announced; New Music Premieres & Papers at Musicology Consortium: “Jewish Archive” Project Continues Worldwide

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
March 8, 2017

Faculty Ensembles combine with Lincoln High students for a memorable concert

On February 9, two School of Music faculty ensembles – the Wisconsin Brass Quintet and the Wingra Wind Quintet – traveled to Wisconsin Rapids, the home of the Mead Witter Foundation, for a special concert to thank them for their support of the school of music. The two ensembles, plus the Wind Ensemble from Lincoln High School in Wisconsin Rapids, performed a side-by-side concert at the Performing Arts Center of Wisconsin Rapids after the students were coached by ensemble faculty and UW-Madison conductor Scott Teeple.

Afterwards, music engagement and outreach coordinator Beth Larson received this note from Jeanne Olson, director of bands at Lincoln High School: “Thank you so much for all of the time you spent organizing that event, my students loved it and learned so much! I had them write a reflection this week, and they were very positive and many listed countless things that they learned from the professors sitting in with them and then working with the small groups!! It was a very successful event!”
Photographs by Beth Larson.

Irving Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Competition Winners to perform this Saturday

Irving Shain, former chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Photograph by Jeff Miller, university communications.

March 11, 4 PM, Morphy Hall.

This years’ duo winners are Rayna Slavova, piano with Chia-Yu Hsu, bassoon; and Kangwoo Jin, piano, with Eleni Katz, bassoon. The four will perform their winning selections at a free concert this Saturday.  Learn about the winning musicians and download the program.

Meet Yasha Hoffman, Russian Studies and composition double major

Yasha Hoffman.

Yasha Hoffman, a Minnesota native, grew up with parents of Soviet/Russian heritage and as a young child, fell in love with Russian folk songs. “One of my favorite activities was putting on ‘concerts’ for my parents where I’d loudly sing Soviet children’s songs and bang on the piano,” he says. He loves the breadth of opportunity offered by classes at UW-Madison. Read more about Yasha Hoffman.

“Performing the Jewish Archive” project continues worldwide

UW-Madison professor Teri Dobbs in Israel, Jordan, Michigan, and Vienna (upcoming)

This past January, Professor Teri Dobbs, a member of the Performing the Jewish Archive team, spent two weeks in Israel and Jordan. During her time there, she was a guest at Tel Aviv University’s Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, together with colleagues from UW-Madison’s Mosse-Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies. In addition, she conducted research in the Yad Vashem Archives, met with musicology/music education colleagues to discuss the possibility of future projects within Israel, and met with the family of piano prodigy and composer, Josima Feldschuh (d. 1943).

Teri Dobbs
Professor Teryl Dobbs. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Professor Dobbs will present several conference papers this coming semester, most of which pertain to her work with Performing the Jewish Archive. Her paper, “Music Education and the Holocaust: So What?” was heard at the New Directions in Music Education Conference: “Musicking Equity: Enacting Social Justice Through Music Education,” Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, February 17. Dobbs has been invited to present more two papers, one in collaboration with soprano and PtJA performer Elizabeth Hagedorn of Vienna, at the 25th European Association for Music in Schools/6th European International Society for Music Education regional conference, JOINT (AD)VENTURE MUSIC: Network as a Challenge for Music Educators, at the University Mozarteum, Salzburg, Austria, April 18 – 22, 2017.
Learn more here.

Read about prior Performing the Jewish Archive events in Madison, 2015-2016.


Selected Upcoming Events

Anthony Georgeson. Photograph by Thomas Bruce.

March 12, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.
UW Symphony with alumnus Anthony Georgeson, bassoon, conducted by James Smith. Georgeson is principal bassoon with The Florida Orchestra in St. Petersburg. Georgeson will play the Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191.  Other works will include Un Sourire pour Orchestre by Olivier Messiaen and Scheherazade by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.  This is the penultimate opportunity to see longtime conductor James Smith, who will retire this spring after 34 years at UW-Madison. His final appearance as conductor will be on April 9. 

James Smith, orchestra conductor.
James Smith, orchestra conductor.

March 14, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall.
Emery Stephens, baritone, guest artist recital. Free concert.
Stephens is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit. Prof. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals and perform with students in a recital, with Professor Martha Fischer as collaborative pianist.

Emery Stephens

The Midwest Graduate Music Consortium – Presenting Original Research and New Compositions

Friday, March 31 and Saturday, April 1, Memorial Union and Mead Witter School of Music. Free events.

The Midwest Graduate Music Consortium (MGMC) is a joint venture organized by graduate students from Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. MGMC encourages the presentation of original research and the composition of new music by graduate students around the country. The 21st annual meeting will include paper sessions, a new music concert, and a keynote address. For the new music concert, seven composers’ works were chosen from a nationwide call for scores. The ensemble Sound Out Loud will perform the new works, each a world premiere. All of the composers will be in attendance.
Find the schedule and concert program at this link:
Midwest Graduate Music Consortium

Sound Out Loud

University Opera’s “Turn of the Screw” receives warm reviews

Katie Anderson (Governess) and Anna Polum (Miss Jessel) in ”The Turn of the Screw.” Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

“Much of the overall success of the show begins with decisions by Ronis (and executed by costume designers Sydney Krieger and Hyewon Park) to resist all temptation to make the specters of Quint (former valet of Bly’s master, who is far removed from the action of the story) and former governess Miss Jessel in any way ghoulish. Alec Brown and Anna Polum, in the roles on Friday night, looked fully human—and that’s just fine. The otherworldliness—and palpable evil—that they exude is in the music and the libretto itself,” wrote Greg Hettsmanberger in his blog, What Greg Says.

Doctoral cellist Andrew Briggs performs with Middleton Community Orchestra

At the March 1 concert of the Middleton Community Orchestra, cellist Andrew Briggs played two works by Antonin Dvorak: Silent Woods, Op. 68, No. 5,and Rondo in G minor for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 94. “Briggs played both of these with affectionate sensitivity. Currently finishing his doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music, he is an artist with an already expanding reputation and a great future,” wrote reviewer John Barker.

Andrew Briggs

On Monday, March 27, Andrew will perform a lecture/recital on his dissertation project, “Piatti and the Body: An Integrative Approach to Learning and Performing the 12 Caprices, Op. 25.”

Morphy Hall, 6:30 PM. Free.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

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Two More Opera Awards; Jazz Program Highlighted; Student Spotlight; Opportunities for Community Members

Happy New Year from the Mead Witter School of Music! And welcome to the first issue of A Tempo! for 2017

Two More Awards for UW-Madison University Opera

University Opera scores again with national recognition

Awards for two shows in 2015-2016

UW-Madison’s University Opera is on a roll. Both shows from last year, Transformations and Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro, have won awards in the National Opera Association’s (NOA) Opera Production Competition for 2015-2016. It is the second year in a row that UW-Madison has garnered an award from NOA, and the first time that each production was separately recognized. University Opera produces only two operas each year.

William Ottow and Rebecca Buechel in Transformations. Image by Michael R. Anderson.
William Ottow and Rebecca Buechel in Transformations. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

October 2015’s Le nozze di Figaro, with orchestra conducted by James Smith, placed second in Division IV, and March 2016’s Transformations, conducted by graduate assistant conductor Kyle Knox, garnered a first place award in Division III.

Both productions were directed by David Ronis, inaugural Karen K. Bishop Director of Opera, who is now a six-time winner of the competition. His previous awards occurred while he worked at Queens College in New York.

Read the full news release.

UW-Madison Jazz Program highlighted- twice!

In December, Madison’s weekly newspaper Isthmus devoted a cover story to our burgeoning jazz program and its director, Johannes Wallmann

“By bringing more jazz to the university and beyond, Wallmann hopes to promote the notion that jazz isn’t just about the past, with its storied history and legendary names. It’s now also about highly trained musicians pushing the boundaries of the genre,” wrote author Jane Burns in her story, “Making a Scene.”

“ ‘Look up any end-of-the-year Top 10 list on NPR, Downbeat or The New York Times, and listen to what this generation of 20- and 30-somethings are up to, it’ll blow your mind,’ ” Wallmann says. “ ‘We want to prepare our students to be part of that.’ ”

…meanwhile, Wisconsin Public TV spotlights the jazz program as part of its “Young Performers” Initiative

For over a year, a dedicated crew from WPT – including alumna Megan Aley, who served as a producer – filmed Wallmann and his staff as they shepherded high school students through auditions for the UW High School Honors Jazz Band. The videos are intended to help aspiring musicians prepare for professional careers and college auditions.

New videos from Making Jazz web series will be released each Monday through Feb. 6. Learn more about the Young Performers Initiative and sign up for weekly releases of the jazz videos.

Meet our students: Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo, bassoonist

Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo came from the country of Colombia to study bassoon performance with Marc Vallon, professor of bassoon.  We asked her how she became involved in music, with the bassoon, and why she chose Wisconsin.

Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo
Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo

“I did my undergrad in music performance in the University El Bosque in Bogotá. I studied with Leonardo Guevara, the principal bassoonist of the National Symphony Orchestra. I learned very much while at school and I was able to play with many chamber ensembles when I was still in school. My first job as a bassoonist was in the Symphonic Band of Cundinamarca, and I worked there for a year during my last year of school. It was challenging, but I learned very much from this experience.

“In 2010, I received a master’s in bassoon performance with Saxton Rose at the University of North Carolina-School of the Arts. As I started to look into going back to school, I talked him, and he recommended that I applied to study with Marc Vallon at UW-Madison. I think it is one of the best decisions I have made in my life!”

Read Juliana’s story here, and click the arrow to learn about more of our students.

Two Community Opportunities – Deadlines Included

Sing with Choral Union this spring! Drop-in auditions will be held on January 18 for community members interested in singing a rare work: Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d. A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois.  The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington.  The work is in memory of “those we loved.”  Two concerts, April 29 & 30. Learn more here. 

Inviting high school pianists to take part in Pathways to Artistry: From the Practice Room to the Stage. A free, day-long event featuring workshops, masterclasses and performances hosted by UW-Madison’s keyboard faculty. High school pianists are encouraged to participate in the master classes and an honors recital.  More information and registration is at the link below. The deadline to register is January 31.

http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/pathways-to-artistry-uw-madison-keyboard-day/

pathways-to-artistry-graphic

Two Concerts – Seats Available

Sunday, January 22, 4 PM, Mills Hall

Sonatas for Violin and Piano

Violinist Soh-Hyun Altino and pianist Christopher Taylor, both faculty artists, perform the Sonata for Violin and Piano by John Corigliano (1963) and the Sonata in A Major by Gabriel Fauré (1875-76). Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for non-UW music students.  Learn more here.

Sunday, January 29, 3 PM, Mills Hall

Our Annual Schubertiade: “Circle of Friends”

This year’s Schubertiade with pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes will feature acclaimed alumna soprano Emily Birsan.  The concert will be followed by a reception (included in the ticket cost) at the University Club. Tickets are $15 per adult and $5 for non-UW music students. The concert is sponsored by Madison resident Ann Boyer, an admirer of Franz Schubert’s music and the musical talents of Fischer and Lutes. Learn more here.

Emily Birsan
Emily Birsan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alumni News

We want to hear from you- please click the link to read about our graduates and send your news!

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

New website; new festival series; farewell to Howard Karp

For the UW-Madison School of Music, it has been a summer filled with considerable anticipation but also one profound loss.

First: We’ve spent months working on a brand-new website. It offers a modern design and many new pages (and it still evolving!). It retains the same URL but offers a completely different look:

http://www.music.wisc.edu/

NewWebsite SS

We invite you to explore and yes, feel free to send comments. We may not be able to accommodate all ideas, but we’ll try!

The new site is “responsive,” which means it is viewable on a smartphone. It contains dozens of brand-new photographs taken by Mike Anderson, father of Eric Anderson, a SOM alumnus and band teacher at Verona High School. We thank him for all his efforts.

We’ve also established a SoundCloud audio page, perfect for the dozens of audio files being routinely collected by our engineer Lance Ketterer.

Second:  For the time being and for a variety of reasons, we have opted to continue publishing the newsletter in this format. However, we’ve updated and renamed it to better distinguish ourselves from a bevy of other publications called “Fanfare.” To join the mailing list, please send an email to join-musicdigest@lists.wisc.edu

Third: And, in addition to a basketful of faculty concerts, student ensembles and solo guests, we’ve planned a series of multi-day festivals that we know will appeal to a very broad spectrum of the community. We hope to attract young and old, performers and non-performers. The festivals will include concerts, master classes, and colloquia. Click links below to learn more.

Celebrate Brass! Featuring Oystein Baadsvik, Norwegian tuba soloist; the Western Michigan and Wisconsin Brass Quintets; SOM alumna hornist Jessica Valeri, now with the San Francisco Symphony; and composer/blogger Anthony Plog.  October 9-13, 2014

MMSD-UW-School of Music Jazz Fest Featuring Ingrid Jensen, trumpeter.   December 4-6, 2014

“Seventy Degrees Below Zero”: the Music of British Composer Cecilia McDowall (in residence) Featuring tenor soloist & UW professorJames Doing with the UW Chamber Orchestra and a multimedia show on polar exploration by UW-Madison scientist Michael DuVernois.  Feb. 19-23, 2015

Honoring George Crumb at 85  Featuring violinist Miranda Cuckson and Due East of Chicago. March 22-23, 2015

Rediscovering Rameau  A yearlong examination of the works and accomplishments of French baroque composerJean-Phillippe Rameau on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of his death. First concert: Marc Vallon, professor of bassoon, performs works of Rameau on Nov. 14. Many events yet to be scheduled; we’ll keep you updated.

Meanwhile, in June, we were saddened by the death of Howard Karp, professor of piano at UW-Madison from 1972 to 2000.  Prof. Karp was the father of Parry Karp, cellist in the Pro Arte quartet. His loss is felt nationwide.

For decades, the Karp family has been famous for its annual September concerts that often featured multiple members of the family, including Prof. Karp’s second son, Christopher; wife Frances; daughter-in-law Katrin Talbot; and granddaughters Isabel, Natasha and Ariana.

Left to right: Christopher Karp; Katrin Talbot; Howard Karp; Parry Karp; Frances Karp.
Left to right: Christopher Karp; Katrin Talbot; Howard Karp; Parry Karp; Frances Karp. 2009 photo.

This year’s concert, originally scheduled for September 1, has been replaced by a tribute event on August 31, in Mills Hall starting at 3 PM. The public is welcome; a reception will follow.

Click here for much more information about this event and Prof. Karp’s life and work.

Note: On Sunday, August 17,  Anthony Tommasini of the New York Times published a retrospective article about the careers of Howard Karp and Leonard Shure, another virtuoso pianist who chose to remain in academia instead of seeking the limelight as a concertizing pianist. Read it here.

Listen to selected Howard Karp works on SoundCloud.

We hope you will join us for this important commemoration, and as always, we hope to see you in the concert halls for many other events this season.First up: Flutist Stephanie Jutt, with pianists Elena Abend and Christopher Taylor on piano. The program will include works of Astor Piazzolla, Carlos Guastavino, Johannes Brahms, and Angel  Lasala. Morphy Hall, September 6, 8 pm.

Thank you for your support of the UW-Madison School of Music!

 

 

 

 

Student profile: Sergio Acosta, flutist-turned-bassoonist

Sergio Acosta
Sergio Acosta and his favorite instrument

It’s the time of year to consider all the fine progress of our students at the UW-Madison School of Music. We have a few stories to share. Our first begins today, with the interesting career journey of Sergio Acosta, who just received his masters degree in bassoon after earning his undergrad on flute. His story came to us from UW-Professor of Bassoon, Marc Vallon.

Marc writes:

Sergio joined the School of Music as an undergraduate in 2006 as a flute player and made himself immediately noticed by extraordinary musical talent and his friendly personality. The course of his studies took an unexpected turn when he fell in love with the bassoon during a woodwind fundamentals course. His uncommon natural ability on the instrument allowed him such lightning-fast progress that he enrolled as a master’s candidate in 2010, only two years after playing his first notes on a bassoon. Sergio’s degree has been partially funded thanks to the Advanced Opportunity Fellowship program that supports access to higher education for minority students.

We asked Sergio a few questions.

What caused you to change instruments? 

I started on violin in 6th grade and in 7th grade began to learn oboe, flute and clarinet. (My middle school teacher would not let me try the bassoon.) Throughout high school I dabbled with different instruments, including baritone sax, and participated in Wisconsin School Music Association solo/ensemble competitions on flute, sax, and clarinet. I became most proficient on flute, so I decided to have flute be my undergrad focus.

But, after taking the bassoon fundamentals class in spring 2008 and playing it for a couple months I completely fell in love with it; it came naturally to me. I felt happy and I was able to communicate musically, after some practicing, on bassoon what I couldn’t on flute.

In a seating audition at UW-Madison, Mr. (James) Smith, our orchestra conductor, who had already heard me on flute for three years, said, “I think you found your instrument. You have a really great voice for it.” This meant a lot and really made me work hard. I then auditioned with Marc Vallon and he accepted me into his studio.

How was it different for you?

The weirdest thing about changing focus in instruments was the change in practice habits, repertoire and mindset. On flute, I focused on practicing sound and tone, whereas with bassoon I focused on technique and facility. I also had to get used to playing different styles of music and having a different role. The flute typically has very high melodic lines, whereas the bassoon has lower solo, but many times supporting roles for other instruments. Plus,I needed to get into the habit of making reeds! There are no reeds on flute.

I realized I would have to work harder than I was used to. Flute was second nature to me, so I was mostly just fine-tuning, while on bassoon I really needed to establish basics.  Eventually, my technical ability caught up to my musicality but sometimes I still need to think a little more about my bassoon playing than on the flute. It’ll take some time before bassoon is as “second nature” as flute is.

It has been an exciting journey that I knew I would not want to give up on. It just had to be. It helped to have a wonderful supportive teacher and mentor like Prof. Marc Vallon who was patient, supportive and kept inspiring me.

Where will you go now?

Throughout 2013-2014, I will be in Madison working. I plan on taking auditions for orchestral jobs around the country and perhaps eventually in other countries, such as Germany. I do plan on teaching more students and teaching as much as possible. I will be playing gigs as often as I can.