Category Archives: Classical

Watch our concerto winners on video; “Delta Blues” online this summer; “Just Bach” concerts in Madison; Vinyl records stage a comeback

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
www.music.wisc.edu/


Watch our concerto winners talk about the works they’ll play this Sunday at our annual Symphony Showcase

Musically, UW-Madison’s annual concerto competition ranges far and wide. This year, winners included a vocalist (Cayla Rosché, soprano, singing Strauss’s Vier Letzte Lieder, TrV 296); a violinist (Richard Silvers, performing Dvorak’s Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 53); a piano duo (Adalia Hernandez Abrego and Jiawen Zhang, playing Poulenc’s Concerto for Two Pianos in D minor); a composer (Anne McAninch, with the UW-Symphony Orchestra performing her new work, Fanfare for Orchestra); and a bassoonist (Chia-Yu Hsu, who will play Bitsch’s Concertino for Bassoon and Orchestra).

Watch here and join the fun, Sunday, March 10, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Tickets: $12 adults, children and students free, available at the Memorial Union, online and at the door. Learn more here.


New summer offering: “Delta Blues,” with Professor Charles Dill. Now offered online!

Registration begins April 1; check back soon for precise course number.
See course guide here.

This class, first offered by Professor Dill in spring 2017, will now be available online as a four-week summer course. In the class, Dill traces the history of the blues within America’s racial history, beginning with the living conditions that produced the blues in rural Mississippi, and detailing the emergence of blues in the early recording industry (Paramount, OKeh), including the earliest examples (W.C. Handy, Mamie Smith), as well as the singers emerging in the 1920s (Blind Lemon Jefferson, Charley Patton, Robert Johnson). The class then follows migrations northward to Memphis (jug bands) and Chicago (electric blues), traces the emerging importance of radio and live performance (King Biscuit Time, WDIA, the Chittlin’ Circuit) as well as living conditions in Chicago (Maxwell Street). It will track early marketing of blues to white audiences (Josh White, Lead Belly) and end with the reemergence of the blues as ’60s folk music. The course is supplemented with extensive musical selections and documentary footage of interviews and performances.

Mississippi Fred McDowell, 1960. Courtesy WikiCommons.

Musicians travel to Cuban sister city, Camaguey

A group of Madison musicians, including UW-Madison bass instructor Nick Moran, jazz studies director Johannes Wallmann and cellist Meredith Nesbitt traveled to Cuba in January. The American musicians played four concerts with Cuban musicians in addition to workshops and other opportunities.

Read story on Channel 3000.

“Just Bach” in Madison

Sarah Brailey

Doctoral voice candidate Sarah Brailey returned to Wisconsin last fall after ten years in New York City. “One of my favorite parts of my musical life in New York City was how much Bach I had the chance to sing. I regularly sang with the two big liturgical Bach series: Bach Vespers at Holy Trinity Lutheran and Bach at One at Trinity Wall Street. Last spring, just after I had decided I would return to Madison for my doctorate (I got my master’s  here in ’07) I ran into Madison violist, Marika Fischer Hoyt, who was in NYC and was attending a Bach at One concert in which I was soloing. We chatted after the concert about how I was coming back to Madison and wouldn’t it be great if there were a similar free, afternoon Bach series that regularly featured Bach’s wonderful and vast cantata repertoire. She got Paul Rowe and Cheryl Bensman-Rowe on board and the rest is history!”
Other Just Bach artistic staff include Cheryl Bensman-Rowe and Paul Rowe, founders of the Madison Early Music Festival; violist Marika Fischer Hoyt; organist Mark Brampton Smith; violinist and SOM alumna Kangwon Lee Kim; cellist and viola da gamba player James Waldo, a doctoral student at UW-Madison; UW-Madison doctoral tenor Wesley Dunnagan; cellist Anton TenWolde; and violinist Nathan Giglierano, a UW-Madison SOM alumnus.

Next “Just Bach” concert: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 1 PM
On the program:
BWV 4: Christ lag in Todesbanden
JM Bach: Herr, ich warte auf dein Heil
Luther Memorial Church, 1021 University Avenue, Madison

https://justbach.org/


Vinyl Grows in Popularity

From On Wisconsin magazine

“Staff members at Mills Music Library have noticed students’ growing interest in vinyl in recent years. Tom Caw, the music public services librarian, says staff and librarians across the country have reported an increase in people requesting, listening to, or checking out long-playing vinyl.

“ ‘I think part of the allure for the vinyl listening experience is that it’s a physical interaction with a device, and I think people are used to having access online to streaming media,’ ” Caw says. “ ’The interactive physical experience is something you can’t replicate online.’ ”

In case you had not heard, “Record Store Day” is April 13.


Upcoming events-Click links for details

Student-run opera: “The Old Maid and the Thief
Two performances – Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 9, 6:30 PM, Music Hall. Free.

Faculty Recital: Jessica Johnson, solo piano – Works of Female Composers
Friday, March 8 @ 8:00 pm PM, Mills Hall. Free.

Wind Fest with Milwaukee Symphony Guests
Saturday, March 9, Humanities.  Free event. Beginning at 1:30 PM, the afternoon will include master classes in flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon with MSO guests, followed by instrumental choir readings and chamber music master classes with members of the Wingra Wind Quintet, UW’s faculty quintet.
Final concert:
8:00 PM, Mills Hall. David Gillingham’s rarely performed Concerto for Wind Quintet and Wind Ensemble.
Guests:
Heather Zinninger Yarmel, assistant principal flute, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Katherine Young Steele, principal oboe, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
William Helmers, clarinet, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Catherine Chen, principal bassoon, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

The Journey of African-American Song with John Wesley Wright
Saturday, March 9 @ 8:00 PM, Morphy Hall. Free.
For this special event, John Wesley Wright will present a recital of a variety of African-American music including examples of calls and chants, children’s game songs, spirituals and ring shouts, hymns and gospels, civil rights era songs, and contemporary songs. During his three-day residency, he will also present a master class and workshop.

UW Jazz Orchestra
Monday, March 11, 7:30 PM, Memorial Union Play Circle. Free.

Faculty Recital: Julia Rottmayer, soprano and Martha Fischer, piano
March 12 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
Soprano Julia Rottmayer and pianist Martha Fischer present a concert featuring art songs from a mother and child’s perspective.

Wisconsin Brass Quintet
Thursday, March 14 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
Featuring student trumpeter Brighin Kane-Grade performing Simple (Leonard Bernstein and Aaron Copland, arranged by Daniel Schlosberg.
Other works include music of Bernstein, Isaac Albenez, and David Sampson.

Le Domaine Musical with Marc Vallon and friends
Friday, March 15 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
A concert of rarely performed music, including a deeply moving piece by Luciano Berio, O King, written in 1968 after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr.


Our Full Concert Calendar includes recitals, students ensembles, and more

calendar


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Coming up soon: Harbison Viola Sonata; Music of Frigyes Hidas; Percussion Concert with Film, Flowerpots and Drums

February 12, 2019

A very busy two weeks for the Mead Witter School of Music!

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
https://www.music.wisc.edu/

This weekend: World Premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata with Sally Chisholm and pianist Timothy Lovelace

Sunday, February 17, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. $25. Buy tickets here.

Learn about the event here.

The concert includes solo performances by Chisholm and Lovelace and the full Pro Arte Quartet.

Read a recent Isthmus review of the Pro Arte Quartet.

On Sunday, Feb. 10, the Wisconsin State Journal published a story about the upcoming John Harbison events in Madison. Read the story here.


UW Wind Ensemble with soloist Midori Samson

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2:00 PM, Mills Hall.

With Scott Teeple, conductor and Cole Hairston and Ross Wolf, graduate conductors. This concert will be livestreamed. Check this page for updates: https://www.music.wisc.edu/video/

Midori Samson

Presenting doctoral bassoonist Midori Samson, winner of the inaugural Wind Ensemble Concerto Competition. Midori, student of Professor Marc Vallon and recipient of a Collins Fellowship at the school of music, has a secondary focus in social work. She holds roles as second bassoon in the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and principal bassoon in the Beloit-Janesville Symphony. She previously was a fellow in the Civic Orchestra of Chicago and has performed in several Chicago Symphony Orchestra family concerts, as well as with the Austin, Charleston, and New World Symphonies, the National Orchestral Institute, and the Pacific Music Festival. Midori holds degrees from The Juilliard School and the University of Texas at Austin.  Midori will perform the Concerto for Bassoon (1999) of Frigyes Hidas . Click to see full program.


UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, featuring works of composer Augusta Read Thomas

Thursday, February 14, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall – Free

Augusta Read Thomas

With Chad Hutchinson, conductor, and graduate conductors Michael Dolan and Ji Hyun Yim. Click to see full program.

Augusta Read Thomas will be in residence at UW-Madison for this concert. Join us for a master class with Ms. Thomas, Feb. 14, 2:00 to 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall.

Among her many accomplishments, Ms. Thomas founded the University of Chicago’s Center for Contemporary Composition: “a dynamic, collaborative, and interdisciplinary environment for the creation, performance and study of new music and for the advancement of the careers of emerging and established composers, performers, and scholars.” An influential teacher at Eastman, Northwestern, Tanglewood, and Aspen Music Festival, she is only the 16th person to be designated University Professor at the University of Chicago.  From 1997 through 2006, Thomas was Mead Composer-in-Residence with the Chicago Symphony, working with conductors Daniel Barenboim and Pierre Boulez.


UW-Western Percussion Ensemble with guest composer Elliot Cole and percussionist Peter Ferry

Wednesday, February 20, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

Ticketed – Children $7 – Adults $17. Buy tickets here; also sold at door.

Presenting a three-day residency by composer Elliot Cole and percussionist Peter Ferry, who will perform with the UW-Western Percussion Ensemble. Works on the program will include “The Future is Bright” for soloist, film, and percussion ensemble and “Hanuman’s Leap” for percussion group, digital playback, and voice. Learn more here.

Elliot Cole is a composer and “charismatic contemporary bard” (NY Times).  He has performed his music with Grammy winners Roomful of Teeth, Grammy nominees A Far Cry and Metropolis Ensemble, as well as the Chicago Composers Orchestra, New Vintage Baroque, the Lucerne Festival Academy, and as a member of the book-club-band Oracle Hysterical.  His percussion music has been performed by over 250 percussion ensembles all over the world.  In 2017 he was invited by Talks at Google to share his unique approach to music through computer programming.  He is on faculty at New York’s The New School and Juilliard’s Evening Division, and is program director of Musicambia at Sing Sing prison, where he works with a music school for incarcerated men.


University Opera and University Theatre: Sondheim’s Into the Woods

From February 21 through 24, University Theatre and University Opera, in partnership with the Wisconsin Union Theater, will co-present Into the Woods at Shannon Hall in the Memorial Union, marking the first time in twelve years that the Mead Witter School of Music and the Department of Theatre and Drama have collaborated on a production.  David Ronis, Karen K. Bishop director of opera, will direct, and Chad Hutchinson, orchestra director, will conduct.

Five performances are planned: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings at 7:30 PM, and Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.
Read about the show.
Buy tickets here.


Guest Artist: Rhea Olivaccé, soprano, with Martha Fischer, piano

The Black Voice – A Collection of African American Art Songs and Spirituals

Recital: Saturday, February 23, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall
Master class: February 22, 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall
Free and open to the public.
Read more. 


In New York: Laura Schwendinger’s Artemisia

March 5–9, 2019
Trinity Church Wall Street
St. Paul’s Chapel, Broadway and Fulton Street, New York City

The Time’s Arrow Festival continues its commitment to amplifying the voices of female artists across multiple mediums. The festival includes the fully staged world premiere of the new opera Artemisia by UW-Madison faculty composer Laura Schwendinger. Artemisia tells the story of the Baroque artist who portrayed herself as Susanna in her famous painting Susanna and the Elders.

Schwendinger’s “High Wire Act” praised in Boston

From the Boston Classical Review: “If one needed to be reminded that a program of contemporary music can be engaging – even riveting – on its own terms, Collage New Music’s concert’s Sunday night at Pickman Hall was the place to be. CNM music director David Hoose led a reading of High Wire Act that brimmed with personality. Sarah Brady’s realization of Schwendinger’s brilliant flute writing was particularly compelling: precise, nimble, and fiery.” Read the review here.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

UW alumni help launch strings education in Door County; pro arte in mills hall tomorrow; Christopher Taylor next weekend

February 1, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music


University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/


UW-Madison alumni form 3/4 of new strings education quartet in Door County

Executive director also an alumna

The first time UW-Madison’s Hunt Quartet played in Door County for Midsummer’s Music, a Door County summer chamber music festival, it was in response to an emergency.

The renowned Pro Arte Quartet had long been booked to play, but the quartet had to cancel. Midsummer’s artistic director James Berkenstock scrambled to fill the void.

The Griffon String Quartet. L-R: Roy Meyer, Ryan Louie, “Vini” Sant’Ana, and Blakeley Menghini. Photograph by Ben Menghini.

David Perry, violinist with the Pro Arte, had a solution: Hire the Hunt, the graduate string quartet at UW-Madison. “David said that this particular configuration of the Hunt Quartet was superb,” says Berkenstock. “He said they already had a program and would do a great job.”

Read the full story here.


Classical pianist Christopher Taylor continues his Liszt/Beethoven cycle

Franz Liszt was a superstar pianist. He was a virtuoso who invented the orchestral tone poem, taught 400 students for free, conducted and composed. Musicologist Alan Walker wrote three volumes about Liszt, shedding light on all of Liszt’s work but especially his genius for transcription. Writes Anthony Tommasini of the New York Times, “The best of these works are much more than virtuosic stunts. Liszt’s piano transcriptions of the nine Beethoven symphonies are works of genius. Vladimir Horowitz, in a 1988 interview, told me that he deeply regretted never having played Liszt’s arrangements of the Beethoven symphonies in public.”

Few pianists have tackled all nine Beethoven transcriptions. Christopher Taylor is one. On Saturday, February 9, at 8:00 PM in Mills Hall, Taylor will perform his sixth transcription – Beethoven’s 8th Symphony. Saturday’s concert will also include six preludes by Nikolai Kapustin, a whose works span both classical and jazz, and the Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (“Der Wanderer”) of Franz Schubert.

Christopher Taylor. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

In 2020, Christopher Taylor will celebrate Beethoven’s 250th anniversary with performances of the Franz Liszt transcriptions of Beethoven’s symphonies, in Madison and beyond. In Boston, Taylor will perform the entire set in five concerts at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Tickets for Taylor’s Feb. 9 concert ($17 adults, $7 children) may be purchased online or in person.

Purchase options here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

Or, purchase online directly at this link.


Pro Arte Quartet this Saturday

February 2 @ 8:00 pm, Mills Concert Hall, 455 N. Park St.

Program: String Quartet D Major, Op. 50 No. 6 “The Frog”(1796) – Franz Joseph Haydn String Quartet No. 9 in Eb Major, Op. 117 (1964) – Dmitri Shostakovich String Quartet in A Major, Op. 41 No. 3 (1842) – Robert Schumann


“Schubertiade” charms audience once again

Isthmus’s John Barker wrote, “A carefully prepared program and a multi-page handout with the full German song texts, with English translations, allowed the audience to become fully immersed in the music.

“And what absolutely wonderful music!”

Check our Facebook page for images from the January 27 concert.

The Perlman Trio following their performance of Schubert’s Piano Trio No. 2, second movement: Mercedes Cullen, Kanwoo Jin, and Micah Cheng. With Bill Lutes at piano. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Upcoming Concerts

Jazz Composers Group and Afro-Cuban Jazz Ensemble  February 1 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Tandem Press, 1743 Commercial Avenue 
Wingra Wind Quintet in Richland Center February 3 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 26625 Crestview Dr Richland Center, WI  Members of the Wingra Wind Quintet in concert, presented by the Richland Concert Association at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Richland Center.
UW Jazz Orchestra & the Billy Childs Quartet February 9 @ 8:00 pm Memorial Union-Shannon Hall, 800 Langdon Street WI  Jazz pianist Billy Childs, the 2018 Grammy Award winner for Best Jazz Instrumental Album, will join the UW Jazz Orchestra on stage for an exciting opening act prior to his appearance with the Billy Childs Quartet.
UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, with composer Augusta Read Thomas February 14 @ 7:30 pm Mills Concert Hall. With Chad Hutchinson, conductor, and graduate conductors Michael Dolan and Ji Hyun Yim.  Program: Jean Sibelius- Valse Triste; Augusta Read Thomas- Of Paradise and Light; Augusta Read Thomas- Prayer and Celebration; Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart- Symphony No. 39 in Eb. Major, K. 543. Augusta Read Thomas will be in residence at UW-Madison for this concert. Join us for a master class with Ms. Thomas, Feb. 14, 2:00 to 5:00 PM, Music Hall. 

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Famed scholar to illumine Schubert history; New strings scholarship created; Medical Orchestra offers musical balm

January 15, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706

http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Welcome to a New Year!

We hope that everyone enjoyed a safe and pleasant holiday season!

Send your news

Note to Alumni: The Hamel Music Center will open this fall, and we’d like to round up as many alumni stories as possible to include in various formats. Stories may include current occupations, research projects, performances and family information! Please send your updates to this email address.


Medical Orchestra soothes performers as much as patrons

On December 3, the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health presented an inaugural concert of the Medical Orchestra of Wisconsin, performing works by Dvorak, Sibelius, and Schubert.  The orchestra is composed of the school’s medical students, graduate students, faculty, and staff, and was conducted by School of Music graduate conducting assistants Jenny Yim and Michael Dolan (pictured, at the podium). The orchestra’s next concert is planned for April 14 in Mills Hall.


Renowned Schubert scholar Susan Youens to present at annual Schubertiade

Susan Youens, recently retired from the University of Notre Dame, has one of the most impressive musicology resumes in the world, and she’ll visit on January 27 to tell us a story or two about Franz Schubert. Youens has won four fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. She’s written eight books, hundreds of articles, essays and chapters, and lectured all over the world.

“Dr. Youens will explore the rich relationship of Schubert’s music to the poems he chose to set and the emergence of new directions in Schubert’s style,” says co-organizer William Lutes.  “The influence of Beethoven had loomed large throughout Schubert’s music, and in the year following Beethoven’s death, the 31-year-old composer wrote works of homage to this great master, as he saw his own music becoming more widely recognized, published and performed.”

Highlights of our Schubertiade  will be a complete performance of Schubert’s 14 final songs, published after his death as Schwanengesang, or “Swan Songs” – among the composer’s richest and most forward looking works; the humorous and risqué Refrain-Lieder, the slow movement of the great Piano Trio in E-flat major, the enchanting Rondo in A major for piano four-hands; and the beautiful song Auf den Strom for voice, horn and piano, composed for a concert commemorating the first anniversary of Beethoven’s death, and filled with subtly haunting references to Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony.

Our Mills Hall living room, Schubertiade 2014. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

In addition to pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes, our guests will include voice faculty members Mimmi Fulmer, Julia Rottmayer and Paul Rowe, voice students Sarah Brailey, Wesley Dunnagan, and Benjamin Hopkins, graduate hornist Joanna Schultz, and guest singer Cheryl Bensman-Rowe. We are also pleased to present the Perlman Trio (Mercedes Cullen, violin; Micah Cheng, cello; Kangwoo Jin, piano).

We thank our generous donors Ann Boyer and Kato Perlman for their longtime support of our Schubertiades, the Perlman Trio, and other musicians and events.

2019 SCHUBERTIADE SCHEDULE:

Master class with Susan Youens. Thursday, January 24, 4:30 PM, Morphy Hall. (Free)
Pre-concert lecture: 2:00 PM, Sunday, January 27, Morphy Hall. (Free.)
Concert: 3:00 PM, Sunday, January 27, Mills Hall. (Buy tickets here.)
Post-concert reception, included with ticket purchase: Sunday, January 27, University Club, 5:30 PM.

TICKETS: $17 adults, $7 all age students/children. Free to music majors, faculty and staff. To avoid long lines, we suggest arriving 30 minutes early or buying tickets ahead of time, either in person or online. Please see link below.

Purchase options (online, by telephone and in person) here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

To buy tickets directly online, click here.


Announcing The Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship Fund

This new scholarship was created with a generous gift from Dr. Stanley and Mrs. Shirley Inhorn. The fund supports graduate and undergraduate students who study string performance at the Mead Witter School of Music at UW-Madison. Susan C. Cook, director of the School of Music, expressed her thanks to the Inhorns. “Stan and Shirley Inhorn have been great and generous friends to the Madison music community. Their ongoing support of the Mead Witter School of Music will ensure that our wonderful students can realize their musical dreams.”

To make an online gift to the Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship Fund, visit supportuw.org/giveto/StringsScholarship (or click the image above).

To make a gift by mail, please make your check payable to the University of Wisconsin Foundation and note the fund name in the memo line. Send your check to University of Wisconsin Foundation, US Bank Lockbox, Box 78808, Milwaukee, WI 53278-0807.

The Inhorns will be formally recognized at a concert on February 17, featuring the world premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata, performed by the Pro Arte Quartet’s Sally Chisholm and Minneapolis pianist Timothy Lovelace. The full Pro Arte Quartet will also perform.

Sally Chisholm

Read about the Inhorns and this concert.

TICKETS:  Buy tickets ($25) to the world premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata, with Pro Arte violist Sally Chisholm and Minneapolis pianist Timothy Lovelace. The full Pro Arte Quartet will also perform.


Christopher Taylor to perform Liszt, Schubert and Kapustin on February 9

Christopher Taylor. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

Faculty pianist Christopher Taylor, a 1993 bronze medal winner in the Van Cliburn competition, will perform Franz Liszt’s transcription of Beethoven’s Symphony no. 8 in F Major, op. 93. This will be the sixth Lizst transcription of Beethoven’s symphonies that Taylor has performed. Also on the program: Six of Nikolai Kapustin’s 24 Preludes and the Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (“Der Wanderer”) of Franz Schubert.

Following Taylor’s 2017 performance of Liszt’s arrangement of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony plus two other works, musicologist Mark DeVoto wrote this in the Boston Musical Intelligencer: “No other piano recital I’ve heard in the past three years has equaled this one for it combination of excitement, interest, and emotion. I hope Taylor will return early and often with whatever conventional or unconventional repertoire he wishes.”

DeVoto’s wish has come true: Later this year, Taylor will perform the entire Liszt-Beethoven cycle at the Isabella Gardiner Museum in Boston.

Taylor also recently performed in Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Remembering Lenny” program of mid-November.

TICKETS:  $17 adults, $7 all age students/children. Free to music majors, faculty and staff. To avoid long lines, we suggest arriving 30 minutes early or buying tickets ahead of time, either in person or online. Please see link below.

Purchase options (online, by telephone and in person) here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

To buy tickets directly online, click here.


Award Announcements: Jazz Studies Professor Johannes Wallmann and graduate pianist Anna Siampani

UW-Madison’s Division of the Arts provides annual awards for arts achievements and future endeavors. This year, the School of Music is represented twice. Johannes Wallmann, director of jazz studies & associate professor of music, received the Emily Mead Baldwin Award in the Creative Arts. Anna Siampani, graduate pianist studying with Professor Jessica Johnson, received the David and Edith Sinaiko Frank Graduate Fellowship for a Woman in the Arts.

Pianist Anna Siampani

Siampani, a native of Veria, Greece, will use the project award to finance her dissertation research. That project includes first-ever primary source research into the solo piano works of Manolis Kalomiris, a composer born in Smyrna, Greece in 1883, who died in 1962. Kalomiris is seen as the father of modern Greek music. This April, Anna will present two events, a lecture and a recital delving into these works, “demonstrating the characteristic Greek idiom with the complexity and inflection of the folk rhythms, the varying touches of articulation and the flowing pacing of the performance practices. She’ll follow up with a CD recording and accompanying booklet containing analysis of the works.

Over the holiday break, Anna returned to Greece to dig into the libraries at the Manolis Kalomiris Society, The National Conservatory, National Library of Greece, and the Lilian Voudouri Music Library of Greece.


Upcoming concert highlights at the School of Music

Double Reed Fest
Saturday, January 19, beginning 1:30 PM in Mills Hall. Hosted by UW-Madison faculty Andreas Oeste, oboe and Marc Vallon, bassoon, the Double Reed Fest brings together oboists and bassoonists of all ages and abilities in a festive celebration of their instruments.

The Panama Papers: Tom Curry, tuba; Mark Hetzler, trombone; and Anthony DiSanza, percussion
Saturday, January 26, 8:00 PM, Mills Hall. Free.

Schubertiade with Martha Fischer, Bill Lutes and Schubert scholar Susan Youens (See above.)
Sunday, January 27, 2:00 PM (lecture), 3:00 PM (concert). $7 – $17.

Spring 2019 Carillon Concerts with Lyle Anderson. Observatory Drive.
All concerts are Sundays at 3:00 PM.
January 13 & 27; February 10 & 24; March 10 & 24; April 14 & 28; May 12 & 26.

Decoda Interactive Performance Residency
Final concert: Thursday, January 31, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.
Decoda is a collective of versatile artists dedicated to creating dynamic performances and creative programs designed for social impact. Decoda’s pursuits place equal emphasis on artistry and engagement to create meaningful musical experiences around the globe through concerts in major international venues and neighborhood projects with vibrant community partners.

7th Wisconsin Summit for Band Conductors
Friday, February 1 @ 7:00 AM – 12:00 PM.
A workshop featuring internationally renowned clinicians focused on self-improvement for the middle and high school band directors. Hosted by Scott Teeple, professor, conductor of Wind Ensemble.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Announcing the World Premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata

December 17, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

ANNOUNCING A WORLD PREMIERE:
Composer John Harbison pens new composition for Pro Arte Quartet violist Sally Chisholm

New strings scholarship also created

Composer and music educator John Harbison, winner of both a MacArthur Fellowship “genius” grant and a Pulitzer Prize in composition, has created a new work for Sally Chisholm, violist with the University of Wisconsin’s Pro Arte Quartet.

Sally Chisholm

John Harbison

The composition, tentatively entitled “Sonata for Viola and Piano,” will receive its world premiere with Chisholm and Minnesota pianist Timothy Lovelace at a special concert on the UW-Madison campus February 17, 2019, 7:30 PM, as part of a yearlong celebration of the composer’s 80th birthday. Across the world in 2018 and 2019, the celebration includes two other world premieres, over a dozen new recordings, a first book and many performances.

In tandem with the concert, the Mead Witter School of Music announces the Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship, initiated with a $10,000 gift from the Inhorns, to be augmented with ticket proceeds from the concert. The scholarship will be awarded in the fall of 2019, and is available to both graduate and undergraduate strings students.

“As the cost of higher education increases dramatically, we recognize that the availability of more scholarships will greatly enhance the ability of the Mead Witter School of Music to attract both in-state and out-of-state strings students,” said Stanley Inhorn.

Susan C. Cook, director of the School of Music, expressed her thanks to the Inhorns. “Stan and Shirley Inhorn have been great and generous friends to the Madison music community. Their ongoing support of the Mead Witter School of Music will ensure that our wonderful students can realize their musical dreams.”

Harbison has known Chisholm for many years. “I have been aware of Sally’s extraordinary playing for quite some time,” says Harbison, whose actual 80th birthday is December 20, 2018. “She performed my composition called ‘The Nine Rasas,’ about an ancient Indian theory of states of being that were both interesting and refined. Sally was quite remarkable.”

The first half of the School of Music concert will feature the Pro Arte Quartet (with Chisholm, violinists David Perry and Suzanne Beia, and cellist Parry Karp) performing Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 76, No. 4, known as “Sunrise,” and Harbison’s “Four Encores for Stan,” an homage for string quartet and narration to Polish composer Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, former director of the Minnesota Orchestra.

The program’s second half will include solo performances by Lovelace, followed by Chisholm, who will play selections from Harbison’s “The Violist’s Notebook,” dedicated to fellow violists Kim Kashkashian, Marcus Thompson and James Dunham. Harbison’s new composition, written specifically for Chisholm, will close the program.

Harbison will be present for the premiere.

The performance will take place at 7:30 PM in Mills Concert Hall in the George L. Mosse Humanities Building, 455 N. Park St., on the UW-Madison campus. Tickets are priced at $25 and are available online.

Harbison currently teaches musical composition and arrangement in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s jazz division. He has composed for the Metropolitan Opera, Chicago Symphony, Boston Symphony, New York Philharmonic, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, as well as scores of other large and small ensembles. His catalog includes three operas, six symphonies, twelve concerti, a ballet, five string quartets, numerous song cycles and chamber works, and a large body of sacred music that includes cantatas, motets, and the orchestral-choral works Four Psalms, Requiem and Abraham. His music is widely recorded on leading labels.

He also is a part-time Madison resident who, with his wife Rose Mary Harbison, each summer over Labor Day weekend hosts the weeklong Token Creek Music Festival, which features classical chamber pieces and jazz.

In 2014, Harbison was one of five composers commissioned by the Pro Arte Quartet to compose a piece commemorating the quartet’s 100th anniversary. His String Quartet No. 5 joined compositions by William Bolcom, Walter Mays, Paul Schoenfield and Benoit Mernier, both in performance and on a Pro Arte Quartet Albany Records recording.

Besides serving as violist for the Pro Arte Quartet, Chisholm was a founder of the Thouvenel String Quartet and the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota. She was a finalist at the Naumburg Chamber Music Competition and first prize winner in the Weiner International Chamber Music Competition.

Timothy Lovelace chairs the collaborative piano program at the University of Minnesota and performs all over the world. He and Chisholm have previously premiered works by Andrew Imbrie for the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota, and have performed frequently with many of this Society’s guest artists such as Nobuko Imai, Pete Wiley, and Robert Mann. “His musicianship gives freedom, imagination, and a purity that is beloved. When I see Tim’s name in concert programs at the Kennedy Center and throughout New York City, I think, ‘They are so lucky!’ “ says Chisholm.

Chisholm believes the new sonata will become an “instant classic.”
“After glimpsing just the first two movements, I recognize how wonderfully he writes for viola,” says Chisholm. “The opening measures are the heart of the viola sound, with brilliant expression and interplay with the pianist.”

The new composition departs from the standard sonata structure of three to four movements to include five and perhaps six shorter movements in its initial draft, Chishom says. The same style follows in many of Harbison’s other compositions, although not necessarily that of his prior viola sonata.

“Compared to Mr. Harbison’s Solo Sonata for Viola, written in 1961, the new Sonata for Viola and Piano is centered in the heart of the viola sonority and soulfulness,” Chisholm explains. “The composer comes through so clearly in both, but the geography in the first few movements of his latest work is more compact. We have not yet seen all movements, and are expecting surprises.”

Harbison is still putting the finishing touches on Chisholm’s sonata which he sees as more of collaborative piece and less of a virtuosic work, if only due to the nature of the instrument and its performers.
“Violists form a close community with a special temperament, which influences what I write for viola,” Harbison says. “Violists understand what they play, and that they share the musical texture with other performers.

“I am hoping for a certain type of musical character,” he adds. “Schuman wrote music for cello and violas called ‘fantasy pieces’ that have more informal characters,” he adds. “I believe my approach is more like that.”

In 2016, Chisholm was appointed to a Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation professorship which she named to honor Germain Prévost, violist with the Pro Arte Quartet from its inception in 1912 through 1947. The appointment included $75,000 in research support from WARF over five years. That, plus an unspecified amount from an anonymous admirer of John Harbison, will fund the commission and additional expenses.

Provisions of the commission required that the work be premiered during the composer’s 80th birth anniversary year and that those performances include premieres on either coast. According to Chisholm, former Juilliard String Quartet violist Samuel Rhodes and pianist Robert McDonald will perform the work’s New York premiere March 19 at The Juilliard School. Subsequent performances will include those by Kronos Quartet violist Hank Dutt in San Francisco, Rice University violist James Dunham at the Aspen Music Festival in Aspen, Colorado, as well as violists Richard O’Neill, Marcus Thompson, and Kim Kashkashian.
The anonymous benefactor also has requested premiere performances in London and Berlin, both of which have yet to be arranged.

Says Chisholm: “We are all so grateful to the WARF Professorship that enabled this commission to be seriously pursued. Funding enables the premiere to be performed at UW-Madison, for the consortium to be formed with world famous violists, the underwriting of our guest pianist Timothy Lovelace, the composer John Harbison in attendance, and a great new work to be added to the viola repertoire.”

Other Harbison-related events scheduled in February include a Madison Symphony Orchestra performance of his work “The Most Often Used Chords” ; a UW-Madison Memorial Library exhibit on his music; and a performance of the Grammy Award-nominated Imani Winds Wind Quintet in Shannon Hall at the Wisconsin Union Theatre. Other area ensemble tributes and musical activities are still in the planning stages.

Tickets ($25.00) may be purchased from Campus Arts Ticketing. All seats are general admission.
• Telephone: 608-265-2787
• In person: Memorial Union Box Office, 800 Langdon Street.
• Online: https://artsticketing.wisc.edu

About the Inhorns:
Stanley and Shirley came to Madison in 1953 – Shirley from Iowa to attend graduate school in biochemistry, and Stan from Columbia Medical School to become an intern at the Wisconsin General Hospital. Shirley is a pianist, and she also played the marimba in the University of Iowa band. Stan is a violinist who played in a string quartet in college and also started one in medical school. Stan courted Shirley by taking her to the Pro Arte Quartet concerts on campus, and soon they married and settled down to raise a family of three children. After he completed his training, Stan stayed on at the UW School of Medicine. One day, a neighbor, who happened to be the orchestra conductor at West High School, mentioned that he was going to audition for the Madison Symphony Orchestra. Stan joined him and subsequently played in the orchestra for several years until his academic responsibilities became too demanding. Their three children all took piano lessons, and in elementary school, each chose to play a string instrument – a violin, a cello, and a viola. Thus, the Inhorn String Quartet was created. Soon the children all joined the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras, in which both Shirley and Stan became life trustees. They also became board members of the Madison Symphony Orchestra and the MSOL for which they received the first John DeMain Award. They have also been supporters of the Pro Arte Quartet and other programs at the Mead Witter School of Music. More recently Stan has been a board member of the Oakwood Chamber Players. The Inhorns appreciate the vibrant music scene in Madison and are pleased to be able to contribute their time and resources to these organizations.

 

 

Concerto Winners on stage March 18; Meet Satoko Hayami from “Sound Out Loud”; Jazz Orchestra 50th anniversary podcast

March 2, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/


“Symphony Showcase” Coming Soon!

Sunday,  March 18, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

We’ve announced this before, but here’s a reminder: Our annual concerto winners solo recital (a/k/a Symphony Showcase”) takes place at 7:30 PM on March 18 in Mills Hall.

Our 2018 winners are Kaleigh Acord, violin (Beethoven, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, first movement); Aaron Gochberg, percussion (Keiko Abe, Prism Rhapsody); Eleni Katz, bassoon (Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in B flat major); Eric Tran, piano (Bach, Concerto No. 4 in A Major); and Mengmeng Wang, composer (premiere: “Blooming”).

Tickets are only $10 for adults, free to students, and there’s a free reception after the show in Mills Hall. Buy tickets here or at the door.


Meet Satoko Hayami, graduate pianist

Satoko, a doctoral student in Professor Martha Fischer‘s studio,  is a member of Sound Out Loud, a recent winner of The American Prize.  Here’s an excerpt from our recent Q&A with Satoko:
“The idea of starting a contemporary chamber music ensemble came to me in searching for ways to better connect with more diverse audiences. I felt that the diverse musical language in contemporary repertoire might have as much or even more potential to be relevant to the different kinds of audiences including young people and non-classical music fans than older repertoire, if presented in appropriate ways. I wanted to team up with people who are open to different, sometimes unconventional ways to present music, and was lucky to find people who share the similar interests, openness and enthusiasm right away.”

Read more here.

Satoko Hayami


James Latimer wins award

Emeritus Professor of Percussion James Latimer won a Lifetime Achievement Award at annual Wisconsin Days of Percussion event, January 27, 2018 in Milwaukee. While at UW-Madison, Latimer spearheaded a Duke Ellington Festival, started the Madison Marimba Quartet, initiated the first of 300 Young Audience Concerts held in public schools from 1969 to 1984, and hosted the Wisconsin Percussive Arts Society “Days of Percussion.”


Shain Woodwind/Piano Duo winners concert

3:30 pm, Sunday, March 4,  Morphy Hall

A competition and recital sponsored by former UW-Madison Chancellor Irving Shain
Winners were announced on Tuesday, February 27. They include: Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo, bassoon and Satoko Hayami, piano;
Anna Fisher-Roberts, flute and Eric Tran, piano.

Read more here.

Local arts reviewers loved “La Boheme”

University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Foreground, left to right: Claire Powling (Musetta), Michael Kelley (Waiter), Jake Elfner (Alcindoro) Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

“University Opera’s “La Bohème” proves a complete success on all counts – from the staging and the costumes to the singing and the orchestra”
Larry Wells, The Well-Tempered Ear, Feb. 27.

“Ronis’ able hand was evident in the players’ acting. The cast was consistently believable, and consequently I was drawn into their world and suffered along with their despair over love’s inconsistencies and death’s sting. Using my acid test for a performance’s success, I never glanced at my watch either night. I was fully engaged.

“The orchestra was a marvel. Conductor Chad Hutchinson let it soar when it was appropriate, but the orchestra never overshadowed the singers. In fact, the key term that kept occurring to me both evenings was balance. The acting, the back-and-forth between the singers, and the interplay between the orchestra and the singers were consistently evenhanded.

“As for the singers, the primary roles were double cast. Friday’s Mimi was Shaddai Solidum whose first aria “Mi chiamano Mimi” was a lesson in the mastery of legato. Saturday’s Mimi was Yanzelmalee Rivera who possesses a bell-like voice of remarkable agility.”

Read the entire review here.

Yanzelmalee Rivera as Mimi in University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

University Opera Offers a Gem in a Bejewelled Setting
Greg Hettsmanberger, What Greg Says, 2.27.18

“Again we have been given much to look forward to; certainly it is unrealistic to see University Opera in Shannon Hall every season, but we can hope that it becomes a semi-regular occurrence. The greater lesson from Sunday’s performance however is this: wherever Ronis and his “kids” show up, the audience is in store for some memorable opera. The national awards and recognition that the program are consistently earning are richly deserved, and our town is clearly the richer for what these folks are giving us.”

Read the full review here.

Johannes Wallmann and Jazz at UW-Madison

“Bucky’s Jazz Savior,”  Madison Magazine, February 2018

“It was that combination of vision, leadership and expertise as a pianist and composer that quickly pushed him to the top of UW–Madison’s list of candidates for director of jazz studies. During [Director of Jazz Studies Johannes] Wallmann’s first year of teaching here, in 2012-2013, he sought out and performed with many local jazz musicians as a means of building relationships and moving the music program forward.

“In less than five years, Wallmann took the Jazz Studies undergraduate program from zero enrollees to 17. It’s an important part of the efforts to revitalize Madison’s jazz community.”

Read the story here.

Announcement: The UW Jazz Orchestra is turning 50! April’s annual Jazz Fest will celebrate this anniversary with three concerts featuring guest trumpeter Marquis Hill, winner of the 2014 Thelonious Monk Competition. Learn about the history of the Jazz Orchestra with our new six-episode podcasts with Les Thimmig, longtime composer and saxophonist. Listen to Episode 1 on our SoundCloud channel.


The American Prize first-place vocal winner coming to Madison on March 19 & 20

Vocalist Kristina Bachrach, recent winner of The American Prize in Vocal Performance and the Friedrich and Virginia Schorr Memorial Award, will perform a concert on March 20 at 7:00 PM in Music Hall. Accompanied by faculty pianist Daniel Fung, she’ll sing selections from “The Recovered Voices Initiative,” started by James Conlon and Los Angeles Opera, which focuses on musical works and musicians that were either suppressed or killed by the Nazi regime in World War II.

Kristina Bachrach

Read about Kristina, the Initiative, and The American Prize at this link.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Hamel Music Center gets attention; Student News; “La Bohème” Feb 23-25; Flute & Keyboard Days

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

“What are those crazy round windows in the Hamel Music Center? It’s a question Gary Brown has gotten a lot lately.”

To answer it, UW-Madison’s Käri Knutson wrote a story for Inside UW, the weekly e-newsletter of UW-Madison.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“…They’re not windows, explains [Brown], the director of campus planning and landscape architecture. They’re sound chambers. And it’s just one of the features that will help the Hamel Music Center hit all the right notes. ‘It’s going to be amazing,’ Brown says. ‘The architecture and design is something we haven’t seen on this campus. It will really create a major gateway feature to campus.’ “

Read the full story here
View our ongoing construction photograph blog

Three-day “La Bohème” run at the Union’s Shannon Hall only three weeks away

The first University Opera production staged at the Union in 15 years, “La Bohème” features 56 cast members and a set designed by Madison’s dean of theater design, Joseph Varga.
In the Union’s “Green Room” blog, read Director David Ronis‘s description of his role as director: “What really interests me [in La Bohème] is seeing how the characters are changed from the beginning of the piece to the end,” Ronis writes. “They are forced to grow up; they become less self-involved; they learn about the fragility of life. Their sense of time changes – they won’t live forever – they learn the hard way how precious life and love are. For me, that’s the fundamental story we’re telling.”

The opera will be staged Friday, February 23, 7:30 PM start time; Saturday, February 24, 7:30 PM start time; and Sunday, February 24, 3:00 PM start time.

Buy tickets here

Fellowship string quartet and pianist heads to Florida

Once a year, a quartet or quintet comprised of graduate fellowship recipients travels to Florida to perform a private concert for  longtime School of Music donor Paul Collins. This year, they will perform works of Haydn, Beethoven, Manos Hadjidakis, Debussy, Liszt, Dvorak, and a passacaglia by Handel-Halvorsen.  Collins not only supports ten graduate students at the school, but also contributed $5 million toward the new Hamel Music Center. The new recital hall will be named for him.

Fellowship quartet
The 2017-2018 Fellowship String Quartet, L-R:
Ariel Garcia, viola; Kaleigh Acord, violin; James Waldo, cello; Richard Silvers, violin.

Pianist Anna Siampani


Harmony in performance: Violin Prof. Soh-Hyun Altino and cellist husband Leonardo Altino interviewed by the Wisconsin State Journal

“The Altinos, married in 2002, were born on opposite sides of the world. They had successful, growing, separate careers when they met and discovered two common languages between them: English and music.

Leo and Soh-Hyun Altino

“The couple came to Madison in 2015 when Soh-Hyun Park Altino was hired as assistant professor of violin at UW-Madison. Leo Altino now commutes from their West Side Madison home to Wheaton College Conservatory of Music, near Chicago, to teach three days a week.”

The Altinos were profiled by reporter Gayle Worland prior to their joint concert debut on January 26 with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra.

Read the full story

Synching science and music

Luke Valmadrid. Photograph by Sarah Morton.

Double degrees are hard, but a triple degree?  “Luke Valmadrid has forged a rigorous path pursuing degrees in chemistry, biochemistry and violin performance — and the dedicated senior wouldn’t have it any other way.”  Luke studies music with Prof. Altino, above. Written by UW-Madison’s Katie Vaughn.

Read the full story

Polish your playing skills at our annual Flute or Keyboard Days

Flute Day,  Sunday, February 11, includes performances by guest artist, flutist George Pope, as well as by UW-Madison flute faculty Timothy Hagen and the UW-Madison Flute Ensemble. In addition, participants will be offered a brief seminar on making practicing more effective and enjoyable. Most importantly, there are opportunities for younger participants to perform in master classes and mock auditions in preparation for WSMA Solo and Ensemble Festivals and other solo performances.

Keyboard Day, Saturday, February 17, will include workshops by UW-Madison piano faculty, including Artistic Pedaling Techniques for the Developing Pianist and Poems at the Piano: How Songs and Poetry Help Us Understand  a Composer’s Mind, Heart and Fingers. Guest pianist Marina Lomazov (Friday, Februrary 16 concert in Mills Hall) will offer a master class.


Music TA wins campuswide teaching award

We congratulate choral conducting graduate student Chris Boveroux, one of only 15 UW-Madison teaching assistants (out of 2,000 total) to win a Graduate School CampusWide Teaching Award. Not only has Chris TA’d in music, but also in mathematics, political science, and integrated liberal studies.

Chris Boveroux


Hire a (Student) Musician!

Not sure where to look for that wedding string quartet, an Easter trumpeter, a church pianist, or maybe you need an arts intern? Post your request on our Hire a Musician blog, about two to four months prior to your event. Recent listings include a request for a quartet for a 50th anniversary party, summer internships available at Bravo! Vail music festival, and a jazz vocalist.


Selected Upcoming Events

  • Guest artists: Anna Hersey, soprano & Alan Johnson, piano. February 11, 1:30 pm, Morphy Hall.
  • Guest artist: Blaise Magniere, violin. February 11, 7:30 pm, Morphy Hall.
  • Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, contemporary classical works. February 15, 8:00 pm, Mills Hall.
  • Master class with Alban Gerhardt, cello. February 16, 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm, Morphy Hall.
  • Guest artist: Marina Lomazov, piano. February 16, 8:00 pm, Mills Hall. Part of UW-Madison Keyboard Day.
    View full calendar for more events.
  • Graduate composer Nathan Froebe, composer winner of the 2016-2017 concerto competition, offers two performances in the next month. February 19: Lecture recital on Pierre Jalbert’s “The Invention of the Saxophone,’ based on the poem of the same name by Billy Collins. Nathan Froebe, narrator; Patrick Specht, alto saxophone; and Kyle Johnson, piano. March 3: “Addiction’s Actuality,” for trombone, piano, and pre-recorded sounds. “Addiction’s Actuality” explores the topic of alcohol and drug addictions, from a person’s descent into addiction, through recovery, and life after. Disclaimer: This piece contains mature themes and content. Nathan Froebe, composer/electronics; Thomas Macaluso, trombone; and Vincent Fuh, piano.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

And the concerto winners are: A bassoonist, a pianist, a violinist, a percussionist, and a composer

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

January 3, 2018

Winners to perform solo on Sunday, March 18, 7:30 PM

They isolated themselves in practice rooms for months, and their efforts paid off.

Chad Hutchinson rehearses the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

The School of Music is pleased to announce the winners of the 2017-2018 concerto competition:

Bassoonist Eleni Katz will play Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191 with the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Chad Hutchinson. Eleni, a student of Professor Marc Vallon, graduates this spring with a bachelor’s of music degree in bassoon performance. Eleni’s win marks the first time in 20 years that a bassoonist has won the concerto competition.

She will join three other soloists on stage: Kaleigh Acord, violin, a doctoral student of Professor Soh-Hyun Altino; Aaron Gochberg, percussion, an undergraduate student of Professor Anthony Di Sanza; and Eric Tran, piano, a doctoral student of Professor Christopher Taylor.

In addition, the winner of the composition competition, doctoral student Mengmeng Wang, will have her work, “Blooming,” premiered by the symphony. Mengmeng studies with Professors Laura Schwendinger (composition) and Daniel Grabois (electronic music) of the School of Music and Professor Joseph Koykkar (composition) of the Dance Department.

The program will open with Leonard Bernstein’s Overture to Candide. “A dashing overture in … a shapely sonata form with points of canonic imitation and a sparkling Rossini crescendo to close.” —  John Henken.

The School of Music’s annual “Symphony Showcase” concert is a perennial crowd-pleaser that combines the joy of youthful accomplishment with the beauty of live music. The community is invited to attend and remain afterwards for a free reception in the lobby of Mills Hall. We will see you on March 18!

$10 adults, free to all students and children.

Ticket information here.


Kaleigh Acord, violin

Beethoven, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, Op. 61, movement 1

Kaleigh Acord. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Violinist Kaleigh Acord hails from Fairfax Station, Virginia and is now pursuing a doctorate of musical arts at University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Mead Witter School of Music. There, she is a student of Soh-Hyun Park Altino and a recipient of the Paul Collins Fellowship. She holds a graduate performance diploma from the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, as well as a master’s of music and an undergraduate diploma from the Longy School of Music of Bard College in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her previous teachers include Violaine Melancon and Laura Bossert. At Longy, Kaleigh served three years as Ms. Bossert’s teaching assistant, and received both the Margaret Rohde Award for Excellence in Solfege and Theoretical Studies, and the Roman Totenberg Award for Highest Academic and Artistic Achievement. An avid chamber musician, Kaleigh has spent her summers at music festivals including Bowdoin International Music Festival, Kent/Blossom Music, the Garth Newel Chamber Music Fellowship Program, Lyricafest, and the Charles Castleman’s Quartet Program. She made her solo radio debut on WQXR’s McGraw Hill Financial Young Artist Showcase in March 2014.

Aaron Gochberg, percussion

Keiko Abe, Prism Rhapsody

Percussionist Aaron Gochberg, an Oregon, Wisconsin native, is completing his fourth year of undergraduate study under Professor Anthony Di Sanza, a program which has presented him with opportunities to perform in Carnegie Hall, the Overture Center, and the Wisconsin Union Theater’s Shannon Hall, as well as to tour Beijing and Shenyang, China. In 2016, Aaron was a Performance Fellow at the nief-norf Summer Festival, where he performed, premiered, and recorded numerous works by both new and established composers. He has collaborated with artists and ensembles such as Sō Percussion, Clocks in Motion, Sound out Loud, Juan de Marcos Gonzalez, Acoplados Latin Jazz Project, the Wisconsin Collegiate All Star Percussion Ensemble, and he continues to seek shared experiences with performers from around the world.

Aaron Gochberg

Aaron has enjoyed an eclectic range of musical experiences, giving him a distinct perspective on percussive artistry. He is a collaborator at heart, and is deeply invested in working directly with living composers. His interest in Afro-Cuban music has granted him multiple opportunities to travel to Cuba, where he has been fortunate to study with some of the most influential musicians on the island, including Mario “Aspirina” Jagerui, Alejandro Carvajal Guerra, Marino Angarica, Luis Cancino Morales, Dolores Perez, and Maximino Duquesne. In 2017, the University recognized Aaron’s study of Afro-Cuban Batá drumming traditions by awarding him a Hilldale Undergraduate Research Fellowship. Recently, he joined the Wisconsin Union Theater as the World Music Coordinator on the Performing Arts Committee.

Growing up in Oregon, Aaron was very fortunate to participate in a musical community, granting him many formative experiences. He would like to thank Lynn Callendar, a member of the School of Music Board of Visitors, for her gracious support over the past four years. He would also like to sincerely thank his many private and collegiate music teachers, who have included Dr. Anthony Di Sanza, Dr. Todd Hammes, Tom Ross, Donald Skoog, and David Skogen.

Eleni Katz, bassoon

Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191

Iowa City native Eleni Katz will graduate this spring with a bachelor’s of music in bassoon performance, where she studies with Professor Marc Vallon. While in high school, Eleni studied with University of Iowa Professor Benjamin Coelho, who sparked a new level of passion for the instrument. Her experience at the Interlochen Bassoon Institute was the pivotal moment when she decided to pursue a career in music.

Eleni Katz

Eleni has always loved the art of performance and is particularly excited to play W.A. Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B Flat K.191, because this is the first time in 20 years that a bassoonist has won the university’s concerto competition. This bassoon concerto is arguably the most important concerto in the bassoon’s repertoire, highlighting the instrument’s range, articulation, and refinement.

Eleni was a runner-up in the Marquette Symphony Orchestra Young Artist Concerto Competition and was a winner of the Irving Shain Piano-Woodwind Competition and the University of Iowa Double Reed Day Concerto Competition.

Under Professor Marc Vallon’s tutelage, Eleni has had six solo recitals participated in both the IMANI Winds and Madeline Island Chamber Music Festivals, and the Brevard Music Center and Chautauqua Institution Summer Music Festivals.

She plans to attend graduate school in bassoon performance next year. Her future goal is to gain experience in performance by playing in a symphony orchestra and chamber music groups. Her long-term goal is to teach bassoon at the university level and to lead a vibrant bassoon studio of her own.

Eleni would like to thank her friends and family, bassoon studio, and professors, who have inspired and supported her throughout her musical journey. Lastly, Eleni would like to thank Professor Vallon for every lesson and for always helping her find new ways to improve her performance of this concerto. Tonight’s performance is the “cherry on the cake” of an incredible, transformative four years of study at UW-Madison.

Eric Tran, piano

Bach, Concerto No. 4 in A Major, BWV 1055

Pianist-composer Eric Tran, originally from Piedmont, California, is pursuing a doctorate of musical arts in piano at UW-Madison with Christopher Taylor. He is known for his friendly stage manner, thoughtful programming, and bold risk-taking. He has appeared in music festivals such as PianoTexas, Aspen, Art of the Piano, as well as festivals in Europe. His principal studies were with pianists Sharon Mann, Thomas Schultz, and composer Jaroslaw Kapuscinski.

Eric Tran

Eric is a graduate of Stanford University and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. During his studies, he was the winner of the concerto competitions of both institutions, and he was awarded the prestigious Robert M. Golden Medal for outstanding contributions to the arts. As a composer, he won the Pacific Musical Society Composition Prize, and his sets of children’s music have been programmed for over six years on the syllabus of the US Open Music Competition. His music has been performed by the St. Lawrence String Quartet, the Friction Quartet, his generous friends, and his charming piano students.

​Eric also comprises one half of the notorious “Happy Dog” piano duo, with his piano partner, Nathan Cheung. They won both first prize and the Abild American Music Award at the 2017 Ellis Duo-Piano Competition, hosted by the National Federation of Music Clubs. For over a decade, they have performed four-hands originals, transcriptions, and classics alike with a focus on bringing humor and joy to the classical music world.

Mengmeng Wang, composer

“Blooming”

Mengmeng Wang

Mengmeng Wang, a native of China, is a doctoral student studying composition with Professor Laura Schwendinger and electro-acoustic music with Professors Daniel Grabois (School of Music) and Joseph Koykkar (Dance Department). She received her master’s degree in music in composition from Shanghai Conservatory of Music, studying with Professor Liang Zhao. She also studied composition with Professors Guang Zhao and Heng-lu Yao.

Her works have been performed in the Beijing Modern Music Festival, in a recital by German violist Christiane Edinger and also by the Shanghai Opera Symphony Orchestra. Her film music was awarded the Honor Award of 1st eARTS Digital Audio China Competition in Shanghai, 2010; one of her art songs was awarded a golden prize at the 4th Chinese National Music Exhibition and Performance in Beijing in 2014; and she won the composition competition of Xinghai Conservatory of Music for one of her chamber music works. She was also named a “top-notch talent” of Chinese popular music by the China Association of Popular Music.

Program Note – “Blooming”
Blooming was inspired by flowers selected by Professor Schwendinger. “Blooming” is the language of flowers; I feel that they are trying to say something to me. I used different types of musical language to describe them. There are also important themes presented in bright metallic timbres and textures which express the flowers’ quiet glory as they bloom, and then a peaceful fading away.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Meet New Faculty: Alicia Lee, clarinet

Clarinetist Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet, came here this fall from New York City, where she performed regularly with many ensembles, including the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Knights, Alarm Will Sound, NOVUS, and ACME, and participated in music festivals all over the world. She co-founded Decoda, a chamber music collective affiliated with Carnegie Hall, and is also a member of NOW Ensemble, a contemporary music group comprised of composers and performers. For seven years, Alicia was associate principal of the Santa Barbara Symphony and also played bass clarinet with the Bergen Philharmonic in Norway in 2013-14. Her degrees are in French language and literature (Columbia University) She studied at The Juilliard School and earned additional degrees from the University of Southern California and The Colburn School as a student of Yehuda Gilad.

At the Mead Witter School of Music, she is now a member of the Wingra Wind Quintet.

Read Prof. Lee’s full biography here.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.

Alicia Lee. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.


In New York City you’ve had a very active performing career. Are you still shuttling back and forth between NYC and Madison? Did you ever foresee yourself entering academia?

Yes, I am still shuttling back and forth between NYC and Madison – this Thanksgiving, I was thankful for nonstop United flights between Madison and Newark. I am lucky to still have performing opportunities on the East Coast, but the main reason I am going back so often is because my husband is still living in New York! I was not necessarily focused on finding a college teaching job, but it was always among the mix of my interests. I grew up in Michigan with my parents teaching in the music department at Michigan State University, so there is definitely a level of familiarity with this environment that I am very much enjoying.

You hold a bachelor’s degree in French language and literature. What connections have you made between French language/lit and music?

My initial reason behind choosing French language/literature as a focus of study was because I knew that I was headed towards a career in music. I wanted to spend my time at university studying something that I always found beautiful and fascinating but perhaps not the most practical! I discovered that the process of learning a language is similar to my experience of learning music. In order to feel really comfortable expressing myself, I have to feel so comfortable in the language that it becomes second nature. There are so many subtleties within language and the more you catch onto them, the more you see them in every language, including music. Unfortunately, my French never became quite as fluent to me as music, but I guess that’s why I became a musician.

What is your most memorable musical or professional experience? Your most embarrassing?

One of my most memorable musical experiences is hearing a classic, live recording of Schubert’s Shepherd on the Rock, sung by Benita Valente. There is a moment where her voice almost, almost breaks, but doesn’t. To me it’s one of the most sublime musical moments that has taught me so much about how I want to be able to play the clarinet. My most embarrassing musical experience was when I was in high school at a summer music festival. I showed up to an orchestra rehearsal – one of my very first orchestral experiences ever – without my music, which I had left on my bed in my dorm room after dutifully practicing my part. Everyone around me was urging me to just run back and get it, but I was so nervous and worried that I just faked my way through Prokofiev’s Love of Three Oranges Suite. Somehow the intense anxiety and adrenaline of the moment got me through. I’ve never played that piece since and if you asked me to hum a tune from it, it would be impossible.

Above: Alicia Lee joins the Decoda Ensemble for a performance of Thomas Adès “Catch.” With Lee are Anna Elashvili, violin; Claire Bryant, cello; and Michael Mizrahi, piano.

Are there any New York City projects that you could bring to Madison audiences?

Six years ago, I along with some close musical friends founded a chamber collective called Decoda. Our mission from the start was to bring meaningful musical experiences to all audiences. As a freelancer (in my former life), it can be difficult to feel real ownership over the work that we find ourselves doing, and Decoda became a very important part of my life since we built it from the ground up. I would love to bring colleagues from Decoda to Madison and also to UW-Madison, because I think we have a unique process and way of presenting our music.

About  UW-Madison’s Wingra Wind Quintet:

The Wingra Quintet is an opportunity for me to collaborate closely with my colleagues in the wind department. We look forward to expanding our performing season and programming many exciting works. One piece in particular that I am looking forward to is “Ten Pieces for Wind Quintet” by Gyorgy Ligeti. While it is considered a staple of the quintet repertoire, it is quite a time commitment, which often prevent it from being programmed. I am lucky to be in a situation where we have the time and space to put together such a masterwork from the repertoire, as well as have colleagues equally excited to work on this beast!

To contact Prof. Lee for information or a sample lesson, email her at anlee7@wisc.edu.

See Prof. Lee with the full Wingra Quintet, this Sunday at the Chazen Museum, noon. Click here for program.

 

Take your pick: School of Music overflowing all April with beautiful noise

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wednesday, April 5, 2017

For this issue, we’ve prepared a special e-blast of selected final concerts at the School of Music. Many more, including student recitals and small ensemble concerts, can be found on our events calendar.

We hope you will make time to attend at least one!  (Click links to read musician biographies and learn about concert programs.)

The Perlman Trio holds its annual recital

Saturday, April 8, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The trio, comprised of Chan Mi Jean, piano; Adam Dorn, violin; and Micah Cheng, cello, is sponsored by longtime donor Kato Perlman. The ensemble is chosen carefully to blend personalities and styles, and each spring concert is a treat for audiences. This year’s trio will present works of Haydn, Dvorak, and Brahms. There will be a reception after the concert.

The 2016-2017 Perlman Trio: Micah Cheng, viola; Chan Mi Jean, piano; and Adam Dorn, violin. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.


32nd Annual Beethoven Piano Competition winners recital

2017 Beethoven Competition winners Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
This long-running event is sponsored by former UW-Madison chancellor Irving Shain. The 2017 winners are Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. The program will include Beethoven’s Sonata in C Major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”) (Kangwoo Jin); the Sonata in E Major, Op. 109 (Leah Kang); and the Sonata in A Major, Op. 101 (Alberto Peña-Cortes).


UW Symphony Orchestra Farewell Concert with Conductor James Smith

James Smith rehearses the UW Symphony for its final concert with him as conductor. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Professor James Smith, conductor of the UW Symphony and University Opera, came to UW-Madison in 1984 to conduct the Wind and Symphonic Ensembles and assumed orchestral conducting duties following the departure of David Becker. He has also served as longtime conductor of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra and will retire from that post as well.
Smith was a professional clarinetist prior to becoming a conductor.


The Hunt Quartet presents a spring concert

The Hunt Quartet, 2016-2017. L-R: Kyle Price, cello.; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; Chang-En Lu, violin. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Tuesday, April 11, 8:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The Hunt Quartet is the graduate string quartet at the School of Music, co-sponsored by Kato Perlman and the Madison Symphony Orchestra. The Quartet is an integral part of the Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Up Close and Musical” program, visiting area schools to teach students about fundamentals of music and the string quartet. This year’s members are Kyle Price, cello; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; and Chang-En Lu, violin.


Stephanie Jutt: Final Faculty Recital

Stephanie Jutt. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Thursday, April 13, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Flutist Stephanie Jutt bids farewell after 27 years
While at UW-Madison, Professor Stephanie Jutt founded Bach Dancing & Dynamite, a summer chamber music festival; UW-Madison’s Arts Venture Challenge; and shepherded many flutists through undergraduate and graduate work. She plans to continue as principal flutist with the Madison Symphony Orchestra and as artistic director of Bach Dancing & Dynamite.


Emery Stephens: African-American Songs and Spirituals

(Rescheduled from March 13)
Wednesday, April 12, 6:30 PM, Music Hall.  Free event.
Emery Stephens, baritone, is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals. Students will perform in a recital with Stephens and collaborative pianist professor Martha Fischer in a concert.


Pro Arte Quartet with guest artist Jazimina Macneil, mezzo-soprano

Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

The Pro Arte’s  final concert of the academic year will feature a rising star singer and a world premiere by composer John Harbison.

String Quartet in E Major, Op. 54 No. 3 (1788)
Joseph Haydn

The Cross of Snow for Contralto and String Quartet (2016)
John Harbison
World Premiere of Version for Voice and String Quartet

String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 16 (1874)
Antonín Dvořák


Annual Varsity Band Concerts with Mike Leckrone

Mike Leckrone at the Cotton Bowl, January 2017. Photograph by Gary Smith.

April 20, 21 and 22, Kohl Center, 601 Dayton Street. All shows 7 PM. $23. Buy tickets.
Help us welcome Mike Leckrone back from his recent surgery! Learn more here.


UW Wind Ensemble

Scott Teeple, conductor.
Wednesday, April 26, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.   Free event.

Scott Teeple. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

The Wind Ensemble offers a Wisconsin premiere of a work by Japanese composer Jun Nagao, and the Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble by Igor Stravinsky with Christopher Taylor on piano.

Guest bassist Linda Oh performs with Jazz Orchestra and UW High School Honors Jazz Band

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Music Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.
Additional events Tuesday -Thursday in Morphy Hall; click here for more information.
Johannes Wallmann, director

Our annual spring Jazz Fest features talented high school jazz musicians, who rehearse with the UW Jazz Orchestra and a guest. This year, our guest is bassist Linda Oh from New York City, who is featured on the cover of April’s Jazz Times magazine. Oh has played with many top musicians; she’ll appear with Pat Metheny at Ravinia on June 14. The week’s events include two free concerts and a ticketed concert on Friday night.

 


UW Concert Choir with cellist Matt Haimovitz

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Presenting “Après moi, le deluge” by composer Luna Pearl Woolf
and “for Paris,” a world premiere for solo viola and choir by UW-Madison composer Laura Schwendinger.

With the Concert Choir and Sally Chisholm, violist of the Pro Arte Quartet.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

“Ferociously talented” (New York Times) cellist Matt Haimovitz, known for his renditions of the Bach Cello Suites as well as Radiohead, will return to Madison on April 28 to perform a work that he premiered here 11 years ago with the UW Concert Choir, one of UW-Madison’s most advanced choirs.

Read full news release here.

Watch: Matt Haimovitz & Christopher O’Riley: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert, 2015


UW Choral Union & UW Symphony Orchestra

Saturday, April 29 (8 PM) and Sunday, April 30 (7:30 PM), Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$8 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

Presenting Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d (text by Walt Whitman).

A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois. The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington. The work is in memory of “those we loved.”

Below: The New York Philharmonic performed this work in 1946.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.