Category Archives: Concerts Off-Campus

Our faculty and students perform all over, not just in the School of Music!

Music Lessons after 55; Remembering Irv Shain; Perlman Concert April 14; Student Creates & Conducts

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music


University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Reminder: The UW Wind Ensemble concert this Saturday, April 7, will be streamed live. The start time is 7:30 PM. Click here for the link.
A panoramic view of the Hamel Music Center under construction, March 2018
The Hamel Music Center, March 18, 2018. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

 

 

 

 

 

Music Lessons after 55!

Retired physician Tim Shaw has a new hobby: taking violin lessons from UW-Madison doctoral student Paula Su. “I’m lucky to have found Paula as a violin teacher,” he says. “She inspires me.” Shaw, who’s currently practicing the well-known tune, “Danny Boy,” says he discovered the Community Music Lessons program via an online search.

Tim Shaw and Paula Su. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Paula writes: “I was born in Taiwan, and I completed most of my education in Taiwan. After my master’s degree in violin performance and chamber music at University of Michigan, I played in Civic Orchestra of Chicago and also taught in the String Preparatory Academy in University of Michigan. Knowing that I enjoy teaching and also have some experience, Professor David Perry recommended that I join the CML program. The students in this program are very diverse. Some of them are undergraduate college students, some are PhD students, some are Epic employees, Tim is a retired doctor.”

“It is really fun to interact with different ages of people from different backgrounds. I draw much inspiration from my students and can also view myself through the teaching process.”

The Community Music Lessons program was founded in 1968 to help college students acquire experience teaching applied music lessons for children and adults. Lessons are provided by undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the School of Music who are overseen by individual faculty members, an experienced graduate coordinator, and a staff supervisor. Lessons are taught on campus, in the Mosse Humanities Building.

The program plans an informal recital on Sunday, April 29 in Morphy Hall from 3:00 to 5:00 PM.

Farewell and thank you to Irving Shain

Chancellor Irving Shain with the UW Symphony Orchestra, undated photograph.

Last month, we bade farewell to former Chancellor Irving Shain, who passed away on March 6 at the age of 92. Chancellor Shain was a champion of the piano, founding both the Shain Piano/Woodwind Duo Competition (recent concert on March 4) and the Beethoven Piano Competition, now in its 33rd year with a winners’ recital concert scheduled for April 15 at 3:30 PM in Morphy Hall. His contributions to the School of Music were significant. We have missed his presence at these concerts and we remember him with fondness.

Read more about Chancellor Shain at this link

Annual Perlman Trio concert April 14

With Kangwoo Jin, piano; Luke Valmadrid, violin and viola; Micah Cheng, violoncello; Suzanne Beia, violin; and Chang En Lu, violin.

Saturday, April 14, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall.

The Perlman Piano Trio is comprised of students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is generously supported by Kato Perlman who loves the magnificent piano chamber music repertoire. Members of the group are chosen on the basis of their outstanding work in the chamber music program at the University.

The program will include Haydn’s Piano Trio in C Major, Hob. XV:27; Schumann’s Piano Trio no.1 Op. 63; and Brahms’s Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25.

Student recitals in abundance

Morphy and Mills Hall and other venues (many off-campus) are now packed with student recitals.  Upcoming performers include pianist Eric Tran, a recent winner of our concerto competition; Zachary Pulse, an oboist incorporating electro-acoustic methods into his music; and singer Talia Engstrom, performing music by Grieg, Mozart, Rossini, and others. See events calendar here.

Student at the podium

Flutist Anna Fisher-Roberts was inspired to create her own orchestra, and will present her first concert on Sunday, April 15 at 3:30 PM in Mills Hall. The program consists of one work: Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring.

Anna Fisher-Roberts (left, with flute) and members of the Milwaukee High School of the Arts in an outreach concert, Spring 2017. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

“This project has been an exciting and enlightening journey,” writes Anna. “I came to music school intending to become a conductor, but since there are no undergraduate conducting programs, it’s difficult to get podium experience. I decided to put this project together mainly to get some time in front of an ensemble, but also for the opportunity to conduct Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring, one of my favorite pieces in the orchestral repertoire. This 13-piece orchestra is entirely Mead Witter students, and is run solely by me and the members of the ensemble.

“I have been soaking up as much conducting as I possibly can; I’ve been taking a conducting class since the beginning of the school year and took over conducting the flute ensemble in January. It’s very different being on the podium than sitting within the orchestra! I am looking at the music in a very different way than I do as a flutist, thinking about how to communicate gesturally and soundlessly to convey musical ideas. Throughout this process, I have had the privilege to work with conductors at the university: Scott Teeple, Chad Hutchinson, and Beverly Taylor. All have generously set aside time to help me to learn the score, and Dr. Hutchinson and Professor Teeple have even reviewed my video footage of my rehearsals and helped me to improve my rehearsal strategies and baton technique. I have also requested and welcomed suggestions from the musicians about how I can be more helpful to them as a conductor, and they always have excellent advice. As I continue in my career, I want to stay in touch with the musicians in my ensembles, to make the music as evocative as it can be.

“I plan to continue my conducting ventures this summer, starting with the Vienna Summer Music Festival Conducting Institute. This is a three-week program where I will work with conductors in front of a live orchestra, as well as take classes and have private lessons. In August, I will attend the Lyceum Music Festival in Utah as a conducting student of Kayson Brown, a conductor with whom I’ve worked in festivals before and who I greatly respect. For next year at UW-Madison, I would also like to create and conduct another student ensemble. I hope that this will be a continuing tradition, as it’s a wonderful opportunity for students interested in conducting to learn and receive feedback.”


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

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Concerto Winners on stage March 18; Meet Satoko Hayami from “Sound Out Loud”; Jazz Orchestra 50th anniversary podcast

March 2, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/


“Symphony Showcase” Coming Soon!

Sunday,  March 18, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

We’ve announced this before, but here’s a reminder: Our annual concerto winners solo recital (a/k/a Symphony Showcase”) takes place at 7:30 PM on March 18 in Mills Hall.

Our 2018 winners are Kaleigh Acord, violin (Beethoven, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, first movement); Aaron Gochberg, percussion (Keiko Abe, Prism Rhapsody); Eleni Katz, bassoon (Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in B flat major); Eric Tran, piano (Bach, Concerto No. 4 in A Major); and Mengmeng Wang, composer (premiere: “Blooming”).

Tickets are only $10 for adults, free to students, and there’s a free reception after the show in Mills Hall. Buy tickets here or at the door.


Meet Satoko Hayami, graduate pianist

Satoko, a doctoral student in Professor Martha Fischer‘s studio,  is a member of Sound Out Loud, a recent winner of The American Prize.  Here’s an excerpt from our recent Q&A with Satoko:
“The idea of starting a contemporary chamber music ensemble came to me in searching for ways to better connect with more diverse audiences. I felt that the diverse musical language in contemporary repertoire might have as much or even more potential to be relevant to the different kinds of audiences including young people and non-classical music fans than older repertoire, if presented in appropriate ways. I wanted to team up with people who are open to different, sometimes unconventional ways to present music, and was lucky to find people who share the similar interests, openness and enthusiasm right away.”

Read more here.
Satoko Hayami


James Latimer wins award

Emeritus Professor of Percussion James Latimer won a Lifetime Achievement Award at annual Wisconsin Days of Percussion event, January 27, 2018 in Milwaukee. While at UW-Madison, Latimer spearheaded a Duke Ellington Festival, started the Madison Marimba Quartet, initiated the first of 300 Young Audience Concerts held in public schools from 1969 to 1984, and hosted the Wisconsin Percussive Arts Society “Days of Percussion.”


Shain Woodwind/Piano Duo winners concert

3:30 pm, Sunday, March 4,  Morphy Hall

A competition and recital sponsored by former UW-Madison Chancellor Irving Shain
Winners were announced on Tuesday, February 27. They include: Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo, bassoon and Satoko Hayami, piano;
Anna Fisher-Roberts, flute and Eric Tran, piano.

Read more here.

Local arts reviewers loved “La Boheme”

University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Foreground, left to right: Claire Powling (Musetta), Michael Kelley (Waiter), Jake Elfner (Alcindoro) Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
“University Opera’s “La Bohème” proves a complete success on all counts – from the staging and the costumes to the singing and the orchestra”
Larry Wells, The Well-Tempered Ear, Feb. 27.

“Ronis’ able hand was evident in the players’ acting. The cast was consistently believable, and consequently I was drawn into their world and suffered along with their despair over love’s inconsistencies and death’s sting. Using my acid test for a performance’s success, I never glanced at my watch either night. I was fully engaged.

“The orchestra was a marvel. Conductor Chad Hutchinson let it soar when it was appropriate, but the orchestra never overshadowed the singers. In fact, the key term that kept occurring to me both evenings was balance. The acting, the back-and-forth between the singers, and the interplay between the orchestra and the singers were consistently evenhanded.

“As for the singers, the primary roles were double cast. Friday’s Mimi was Shaddai Solidum whose first aria “Mi chiamano Mimi” was a lesson in the mastery of legato. Saturday’s Mimi was Yanzelmalee Rivera who possesses a bell-like voice of remarkable agility.”

Read the entire review here.
Yanzelmalee Rivera as Mimi in University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
University Opera Offers a Gem in a Bejewelled Setting
Greg Hettsmanberger, What Greg Says, 2.27.18

“Again we have been given much to look forward to; certainly it is unrealistic to see University Opera in Shannon Hall every season, but we can hope that it becomes a semi-regular occurrence. The greater lesson from Sunday’s performance however is this: wherever Ronis and his “kids” show up, the audience is in store for some memorable opera. The national awards and recognition that the program are consistently earning are richly deserved, and our town is clearly the richer for what these folks are giving us.”

Read the full review here.

Johannes Wallmann and Jazz at UW-Madison

“Bucky’s Jazz Savior,”  Madison Magazine, February 2018

“It was that combination of vision, leadership and expertise as a pianist and composer that quickly pushed him to the top of UW–Madison’s list of candidates for director of jazz studies. During [Director of Jazz Studies Johannes] Wallmann’s first year of teaching here, in 2012-2013, he sought out and performed with many local jazz musicians as a means of building relationships and moving the music program forward.

“In less than five years, Wallmann took the Jazz Studies undergraduate program from zero enrollees to 17. It’s an important part of the efforts to revitalize Madison’s jazz community.”

Read the story here.

Announcement: The UW Jazz Orchestra is turning 50! April’s annual Jazz Fest will celebrate this anniversary with three concerts featuring guest trumpeter Marquis Hill, winner of the 2014 Thelonious Monk Competition. Learn about the history of the Jazz Orchestra with our new six-episode podcasts with Les Thimmig, longtime composer and saxophonist. Listen to Episode 1 on our SoundCloud channel.


The American Prize first-place vocal winner coming to Madison on March 19 & 20

Vocalist Kristina Bachrach, recent winner of The American Prize in Vocal Performance and the Friedrich and Virginia Schorr Memorial Award, will perform a concert on March 20 at 7:00 PM in Music Hall. Accompanied by faculty pianist Daniel Fung, she’ll sing selections from “The Recovered Voices Initiative,” started by James Conlon and Los Angeles Opera, which focuses on musical works and musicians that were either suppressed or killed by the Nazi regime in World War II.

Kristina Bachrach
Read about Kristina, the Initiative, and The American Prize at this link.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Meet New Faculty: Alex Noppe, trumpet

New trumpet adjunct professor Alex Noppe came to UW-Madison this fall to teach both classical and jazz trumpet. While he hails from Green Bay, his career has taken him all over the world, as a member of the Mirari Brass Quintet, which he co-founded, of the Louis Romanos Quartet, which plays new Orleans-style jazz, and as a performer and soloist in orchestras and as a clinician at brass conferences. He’s also a composer and arranger. In Madison, Alex is a member of the Wisconsin Brass Quintet, which recently returned from a Big Ten performance tour, and will next perform in Rhinelander (February 22); and in Madison (February 24).  Click here to read Alex’s full biography.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.

Alex Noppe. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

What approaches do you take when teaching jazz trumpet vs classical trumpet?

I don’t really treat different styles of music all that differently.  In my opinion, the “umbrella” under which all study is organized is trumpet fundamentals—all of the skills, concepts, and techniques that go into becoming an excellent player on your instrument.  Underneath that are various bins of styles & repertoire that get studied individually—baroque, jazz, orchestral, mariachi, etc.  But the techniques for learning each individual style don’t really differ that much.  I suppose jazz players tend to do a lot more ear-development exercises, but that’s something that everyone else should be doing as well.

You’ve had a diverse array of performance opportunities, which include orchestras, chamber groups, and jazz ensembles. Do you have a preference for any one type of performance setting or musical style? 

Not particularly.  I’m at my happiest when I’m involved in a variety of different performing activities, so I enjoy the challenge of rapidly switching back and forth between genres and groups.  Having said that, the majority of my playing these days is in small chamber groups.

The Mirari Brass Quintet. L-R: Stephanie Frye (tuba); Sarah Paradis (trombone); Matthew Vangjel (trumpet); Jessie Thoman (horn); Alex Noppe (trumpet).

Tell us about the Mirari Brass Quintet (pictured above).

Originally, it was a group of graduate students at Indiana that formed the group, but over the years we changed a few members (adding Stephanie Frye, UW-Madison MM 2010 & DMA 2013).  We’ve always had a bit of an interesting model in that we live in four different states scattered across the country, which definitely presents some challenges for rehearsing and performing.

Mirari is in its ninth season together and we spend most of our time doing concert tours, educational residencies, and new music commissioning.  We play a fairly eclectic mix of music that we’ve affectionately dubbed “stylistic whiplash”–everything from Renaissance to jazz to contemporary classical to Latin to musical theater, and on and on.  At this point we’ve performed in about 30 states and did our first international concert tour this past summer in China.  We have one album out from a few years ago and another one being released in just over a month on Summit Records.

What works have you arranged for Mirari?

I do the bulk of the in-house composing and arranging for the group, and at this point I’ve probably contributed about 20 pieces to our book. I’ve done a few jazz arrangements from composers like Charles Mingus, Thad Jones, Chick Corea, and Pat Metheny, some original compositions, a piece for quintet and vocals, one for quintet with piano, and one for quintet and wind ensemble.

Above: The Mirari Brass Quintet performing “Spires,” a commissioned work from Rome Prize winner and Guggenheim Fellow Eric Nathan. “Spires” may be heard on Mirari’s 2012 CD, also called “Spires.”

What is your most memorable musical experience? What is your most embarrassing musical experience?

Tough question—not sure if I have only one answer for this!  Some of the more memorable performances include performing in Thailand and China with my chamber groups, a jazz festival in Maui that included a home-stay with not one but two infinity pools, and getting to work with an amazing array of great musicians including Leonard Slatkin, Wycliffe Gordon, John Clayton, Randy Brecker, and many others.  Oh yeah, and sharing a duet on an album with “Yes” lead singer Jon Anderson.

As for embarrassing experiences—probably too many to count, but they definitely include dressing up as pop star Michael Jackson for an orchestra concert, passing out while playing a high note during my freshman year of college, and recording a marching band version of “Spider-Pig” (yes, from the Simpsons movie!).

Your bio lists that you were a “cellophonist” in a concerto for cellphones and orchestra. What was that?

Definitely one of the more entertaining gigs.  My mentor in grad school, David Baker, was commissioned to write a concerto for cell phones and orchestra—especially amusing since he could barely use his own.  My role included juggling 3-4 different phones at the front of the stage and triggering off various ringtones, accompanied by the orchestra and several hundred phones from the audience.  The music director of the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra coined the term ‘cellophonist’, and I’ve found it hilarious ever since.

Contact Alex for a visit and/or a sample lesson: noppe@wisc.edu

Meet New Faculty: Matt Endres, Jazz Drums & Jazz History

In September, we welcomed Matt Endres as a new adjunct professor teaching jazz drums and jazz history. Matt is from Sauk City,  and received his bachelor’s of music degree at UW-Stevens Point, his master’s degree in jazz studies from the University of Illinois, and his doctoral degree in jazz studies and ethnomusicology at the University of Illinois. He’s been a bandleader, a sideman, and played drums with the Downbeat award-winning group “Old Style Sextet.” He’s heard on multiple albums and has worked with many well-known musicians, including trumpeter Doc Severinson. Read Matt’s full bio here.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.


What is one topic in jazz history that you find most important to share with your students? 

I don’t focus solely on major artists who would be considered “hallmarks” in my courses. I find it more relevant to emphasize what was happening socially, racially, economically, and politically in the US from the 19th century to present day. These are the things that shaped what we know today as the purely American music of jazz. After all, these topics act as the main artery that powered the evolution of this music. Note: Next spring, Matt will teach the class “Jazz Innovators: Armstrong, Ellington and Beyond,” Tuesdays & Thursdays from 1 to 2:15 PM. Learn more in the Course Guide.

What types of opportunities would you like our students to have?

Playing gigs is definitely the best arena for personal development as a musician. We live in a city that is very rich in the musical sense. There are many opportunities to play in Madison and I stress the importance of getting out, being heard, and creating with as many musicians as possible.

What was it like working with Doc Severinsen?

Doc is one of the most professional people I’ve ever worked with. Any horn player that complains about their chops after a gig, I have no sympathy for. Doc is 90 years old and has more stamina than anyone. He still performs with true effortless mastery. A true sweetheart and a giant influence.

Click here to read a story in the Sauk Prairie Eagle about Matt’s appointment to the School of Music.

What’s the most rewarding thing about teaching the students here at UW?

These kids work and have a real passion for music. I’ve noticed substantial maturity in their playing in a very short period of time. They have a hunger for progress and the standards put onto them by faculty elevate their musicality immensely. I’m very honored to be working with world class educators here within the Mead Witter School of Music.  Within the jazz department specifically, Johannes Wallmann has a very clear vision on what this young department will be, and what he has created thus far is extraordinary. The opportunities he provides for the students is very inspirational. I’m very honored to have the privilege to work along side him and he has exposed me to many different academic arenas.

Share one memorable and one embarrassing musical experience. 

My most memorable experience also acts as my most embarrassing one. In October of 2014, in Macau, China, I dropped a stick in the middle of one of my solos in the finals of a music competition. I made it out alive and was able to develop it into a formative arrangement. That remains to be one of my most creative experiences I’ve had playing to this day.

What are some of the highlights from your career thus far?

I’ve had the pleasure of playing with many world class musicians/composers and created a lot of fantastic music.  I’m fortunate to have success internationally on music charts with a handful of these records. Still, the most memorable and rewarding aspect of recording has been noticing the personal progress in my own playing after cutting a record.

Where can we hear you in Madison?

I’ll play Thursday, December 7, with the Tony Barba Quartet at Madison’s (119 King St.) from 8-11 PM; Sunday, December 17 for Madison Jazz Jam at The Rigby (119 E. Main Street) from 4-7 PM; and Friday, December 29, at North Street Cabaret with the Tony Barba Quartet, 8 PM.


Want to meet Matt and /or request a sample lesson? Reach him at mcendres@wisc.edu.

Welcome back, everyone!

Welcome to the 2017-2018 academic year at the Mead Witter School of Music!

We hope you had an enjoyable, relaxing and productive summer.  We’re ready to begin the fall semester with plenty of news and events.

New faculty

Introducing Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet; Alex Noppe, adjunct professor of trumpet; Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz drums & jazz history; Timothy Hagen, adjunct professor of flute; David Scholl, instructor of double bass; and Chad Hutchinson, adjunct professor of instrumental conducting, director of orchestras and conductor of University Opera.  Read their biographies here.

New digital music studio

This fall, the Mead Witter School of Music will add a new studio to Humanities: the Electro-Acoustic Research Space (EARS). Located in a former classroom, EARS will be stuffed with the latest electronic music equipment, and will be available to faculty, students, and collaborators within the School of Music and in other departments. Read the announcement here.

Grand opening: Friday, September 15, 7:30 PM, Room 2401 (street level), Mosse Humanities Building, 455 North Park Street.

Prof. Dan Grabois in the new EARS studio, being interviewed by a writer from the local weekly, Isthmus.

Ten Years of the Perlman Piano Trio!

Last spring marked the tenth year of the Perlman Piano Trio, a student ensemble founded and supported by Kato Perlman. Learn more about the history of the trio with this special slideshow.

https://spark.adobe.com/page-embed.jsTen Years of the Perlman Piano Trio

New book about the Pro Arte Quartet

Local historian emeritus and classical music reviewer John W. Barker has penned an authoritative biography of the Pro Arte Quartet, with a comprehensive look at the members and the music.  Titled “The Pro Arte Quartet: A Century of Musical Adventure on Two Continents,” it is the first full biography of the quartet, which is comprised of members David Perry, Suzanne Beia, Sally Chisholm, and Parry Karp. The 353-paged book, published by Boydell & Brewer, Limited, will be available for purchase on November 15th. The book was commissioned in 2011 by the School of Music. Learn more here.

Music Education program scores high in online magazine

College Magazine, an online publication founded as a print magazine in 2007 by a student at the University of Maryland, placed UW-Madison above such luminaries as Johns Hopkins and Berklee.

The Madison approach to music ed emphasizes community outreach, research, and social justice, says Associate Professor Teryl Dobbs, chair of the music education program. “We recently created an entire revision of the entire undergraduate music ed degree and teacher licensure program… for 21st century students and the diverse students that our own students will teach,”  Dobbs said.  The story was sponsored by the National Association of Music Merchants.  Read the story here.

Over the past several years, Prof. Dobbs has traveled the world presenting her research into the Holocaust and music education as part of the “Performing the Jewish Archive” project. In Vienna last spring, she joined with former visiting professor Elizabeth Hagedorn to present ideas on curriculum revisions to develop deeper understandings of music outside the usual university canon.

On Sept. 17, hear Prof. Dobbs along with Prof. Rachel Brenner of the Center for Jewish Studies and Jessica Kasinski, recent DMA graduate, in a “University of the Air” program with Emily Auerbach and Norman Gilliland. “Why Teach the Holocaust?” will air from 4 to 5 PM on the Ideas Network of Wisconsin Public radio. It will be archived at https://www.wpr.org/programs/university-air

This September, Prof. Dobbs will travel to South Africa for more presentations and eventsRead about “Performing the Jewish Archive” here.

New classes offered this fall

The School of Music will offer two new classes this fall. Please contact the instructor (click the name below) to learn if you may register or possibly audit. Non-majors are welcome.

Music 497 – Jazz History

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 AM- 12:15 PM, room 2411 Humanities. With Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz history & drums
This course focuses on cultural influences on the western development of jazz. By exploring historical and ethnographic works by scholars in ethnomusicology, history, anthropology, and communication, this course examines cultural aspects that influenced traditional and contemporary genres of jazz. Along with learning about the music that has influenced today’s popular genres through interactive participation and conversation, you’ll also develop tools to create case & field studies to study music through culture, and vice versa. Limit: 30 students.

Music 268, Lab 3 – Drumming the World Ensemble

Wednesdays, 1:20 to 3:15 PM, room 1321 Humanities.  Open to all  students; required for music education majors.

With Todd Hammes, percussion instructor. Drumming the World Ensemble is a structured drum circle wherein the music will be created by the class based on the study and application of drumming traditions from around the world. Instruments provided and will include Djembe, Conga, Dumbek, Darabuka, Bells, Rattles, and found objects. Limit: 15 students.

Upcoming concerts – September only

For future listings, please click here for our concert calendar. Our semesters are very full!

Concerts are free admission unless otherwise indicated.

Canceled: Annual Labor Day Karp Family concert

Faculty Recital: Mimmi Fulmer, voice, with guest pianist Craig Randal Johnson. September 10 @ 1:30 pm. Music celebrating Finland’s 100th anniversary of independence.

Faculty Recital: Paul Rowe, voice; Martha Fischer, piano. September 15 @ 8:00 pm.  A program of German art songs, in partnership with the German Department.

Faculty Recital: Jeanette Thompson, soprano, with guests Thomas Kasdorf, piano; and Paul Rowe, baritone. September 22 @ 7:00 pm. Lieder and spirituals.

Faculty Recital: Christopher Taylor, piano. September 23 @ 8:00 pm. $5 – $15. SOM students and faculty free admission.

Christopher Taylor performing in Mills Hall, Feb. 2015. Photo by Michael R. Anderson.

Pro Arte Quartet – September 24 @ 7:30 pm.  David Perry and Suzanne Beia, violin; Sally Chisholm, viola; and Parry Karp, cello.
An all-Mozart program with guest cellist Jean-Michel Fonteneau
and guest clarinetist Alicia Lee.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a 24-page newsletter/calendar that is printed and mailed every August. To receive a copy, click here to send us your postal address in an email.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Final Concerts: UW Choral Union, UW Symphony, Jazz; Jewish Archive; and more!

April 18, 2016
Greetings from the School of Music!  We’re overflowing with concerts the next two weeks; here are just a few highlights. Click here to see the entire calendar.
Choral Union presents Joseph Haydn’s “The Creation”

Beverly Taylor, conductor

Mills Hall, Sunday, April 24, 3:30 PM

Poster design by Tonka Raycheva

Haydn’s “The Creation,” written between 1797 and 1798, is considered one of the great masterworks of western music and civilization.  It has beautiful and exciting choral writing, demanding, intricate and soaring solos, and some of the most inventive orchestral writing of its time, both in the opening depiction of Chaos—the pre-creation state, and in the pictorial writing about animals, water, and light, all at their beginning stages.  Part I depicts the stages of creation, Part II a celebration of that creation, and Part III the new love between Adam and Eve.

“The Creation” debuted in London and was sung in English.  Our production uses the Robert Shaw version of the English text, which clears up some of the original strange grammar which resulted from the Haydn’s libretto going through a German translation and back to English. The libretto mixes Biblical language with new language for the soloists.

Our soloists include alumna Jamie-Rose Guarrine, as angels Gabriel and Eve; Voice Professor James Doing as angel Uriel; alumnus  Benjamin Schultz as angel Raphael; and current student Benjamin Li as Adam.

Tickets: $15 general public, $8 students. Buy online here or in person at the Memorial Union Box Office or at the door.

UW Symphony Orchestra with Guest Conductor Andreas Stoehr

Mills Hall, Friday, April 22, 8:00 PM- Free concert

Andreas Stoehr rehearses the UW Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Hannah Olson.
Andreas Stoehr rehearses the UW Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Hannah Olson.

Vienna native Andreas Stoehr will lead the university orchestra in performances of Overture to Der Freischütz (Carl Maria von Weber), Wesendonck Lieder (Richard Wagner), and Symphony No. 6 (Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky). With soprano Elizabeth Hagedorn.

“At first glance our program appears to be a nice bouquet of romantic pieces, but as I believe that music and philosophy share the same spiritual source, one can see that each composer tries to answer the main question: ‘Where is the exit from the burden of life?’ ” says Prof. Stoehr.

“Carl Maria von Weber’s answer: ‘There is God, there is hope, therefore good wins over evil.’ Wagner leads us to ‘unbewusst, höchste Lust’ (unaware, sublime desire; the last lines of Tristan and Isolde ) expressing his belief in uncontrollable, germinating power of love. The poetry by Mathilde Wesendonck, Wagner’s muse, reflects their profound, but impossible relationship and inspired him to Tristan and Isolde as his unique philosophy of escaping the world through an idealized love. Tchaikovsky’s ‘Pathétique’ Symphony No. 6  does not try at all to answer the question. We sense in his music his personal struggle between good and evil, right and wrong, light and darkness. Like the most famous literary works of his time by Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky, Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece comes to us as a drama, but without words. When life is over – it’s over.”

Hear Andreas Stoehr on Wisconsin Public Radio’s “The Midday” with Norman Gilliland, noon on Wednesday, April 20.

Jazz Week with LA saxophonist Bob Sheppard

Nine area high schools to participate in final concert

April 26, 28, 29 – Various times and locations

The Jazz Studies program, led by Professor Johannes Wallmann, will present a weeklong residency with LA-based Bob Sheppard, worldwide multi-woodwind performer, recording artist, and jazz musician.

Bob Sheppard. Photograph by Suzuki K.
Bob Sheppard. Photograph by Suzuki K.

The three-day event includes master classes and two concerts. It will feature the UW Jazz Ensembles, the UW Jazz Orchestra, the UW High School Honors Jazz Band, and the Johannes Wallmann Quartet.  The 2016 Honors Jazz Band, directed by UW Director of Jazz Studies Johannes Wallmann and co-conductor Eric Siereveld, is a twenty-member big band that includes top jazz students from Edgewood, James Madison Memorial, Madison East, Madison West, Middleton, New Glarus, Portage, Sun Prairie, and Waunakee High Schools.

Events:
Free Master Class/Concert Tue, April 26, 8 PM, Morphy Hall (with the Composers Septet & Contemporary Jazz Ensemble)
Concert Thur, April 28, 8 PM, Morphy Hall (with the Johannes Wallmann Quartet) Ticketed $15 single
Concert Fri, April 29, 8 PM, Music Hall (with the UW Jazz Orchestra & High School Honors Jazz Band) Ticketed $15 single

$25 both Thursday and Friday shows. Students of all ages free!

Buy tickets to Thursday’s show.

Buy tickets to Friday’s show.

Buy tickets to both shows.


 

U.S. Air Force “Freedom Winds” percussion/wind quintet to perform April 21 – Free concert

Music Hall, Thursday, April 21, 7:30 PM

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The School of Music is honored to present the Freedom Winds, a visiting ensemble from the United States Air Force Band of Mid-America. Composed of six virtuoso Airman Musicians, the group adds percussion to the traditional woodwind quintet instrumentation to enhance standard literature and increase their musical capabilities. Repertoire includes jazz and ragtime classics along with popular themes from Broadway’s hit shows to Hollywood’s greatest films.  Please join us for what promises to be a fun and memorable concert!

“Out of the Shadows” Rediscovering Jewish Music, Literature and Theater

May 1-5, 2016, Madison, various locations and times

“Piecing together lost generations of creativity”: that’s how the Wisconsin State Journal’s Gayle Worland phrased it in her news story last summer. Generations of Jewish creativity lost due to the Holocaust and the diaspora, now placed front and center in a worldwide effort to discover those that were lost, reclaim those that are forgotten, and perform those that have been neglected.

From May 1 through May 5, that creativity will be on display in Madison as part of “Out of the Shadows,” coordinated by music education professor Teryl Dobbs and faculty at the University of Leeds, England. Over five days, events ranging from cabaret to ethnomusicology discussions to chamber music to theater will be presented at various locations in Madison. Ticket prices range from $5 to $10.00. Buy tickets here.

PJA-2016-flyer

The three-year “Performing the Jewish Archive” project involves a large number of partners, exploring archives, delivering community and educational projects, holding at least two international conferences and a series of symposia at the British National Library, as well as mounting five international performance festivals––in the United States (Madison, WI), the Czech Republic, South Africa, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

Download the full schedule here (PDF)

Or check our online link: http://www.music.wisc.edu/performing-the-jewish-archive-may-2016-events/


Faculty News: Parry Karp

Student News: Claire Powling, Grace Subat



PHOTO GALLERY     A Day in the Life of a Music School: A master class with composer and cellist Paul Desenne, April 11, 2016. Images by Michael R. Anderson.


 

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Perlman Trio holds annual concert; Recital showcases teaching talent and their youthful students

News and Events from the UW-Madison School of Music – March 30, 2016

Happy Spring from the School of Music! In this newsletter:

–The Perlman Trio’s annual performance
–UW Masters Singers add State Capitol concert
–Three student recitals illustrate breadth of school; many more scheduled this month
–Community Music Lessons Spring Recital showcases youthful students and their college teachers
–Fresco Opera’s Clara features alumni
–Pro Arte, Wingra Wind Quintet, UW Symphony, and UW Varsity Band in concert
–University Opera’s Transformations earns critical praise

For a complete listing of events, please click to see our April calendar.

Perlman Piano trio to perform April 9
The Perlman Piano Trio. L-R: Adam Dorn, violin; SeungWha Baek, piano; Micah Cheng, cello.
The Perlman Piano Trio. L-R: Adam Dorn, violin; SeungWha Baek, piano; Micah Cheng, cello.

The Perlman Piano Trio, a student ensemble funded by donor Kato Perlman, holds its only concert of the academic year on Saturday, April 9, 3:30 PM, in Morphy Hall. The trio consists of Adam Dorn, violin; SeungWha Baek, piano; Micah Cheng, cello. On the program is the Mozart Piano Trio in E major, K. 542; the Schumann Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op.44; and the Brahms Piano Trio in C minor, Op. 101. For the quintet, the trio will be joined by Keisuke Yamamoto on the violin and Luke Carmichael Valmadrid on the viola.

“It’s my first piano trio,” says violinist Adam Dorn, a Minneapolis native. “It’s very high caliber playing, very different from anything I’ve ever done. And being given a scholarship to do something that you love is amazing.” The trio is  coached by Martha Fischer, professor of collaborative piano, and Parry Karp, cellist of the Pro Arte Quartet.
A reception will follow the concert. To learn more about the backgrounds of our musicians, download this PDF of the program.
Perlman Piano Trio program

Catch Masters Singers at the State Capitol!

rotunda

This just in from graduate student and co-conductor Christopher Boveroux: The UW Masters Singers will entertain passersby in the State Capitol rotunda, Friday, April 8, 4:30 PM.  They’ll sing all a cappella in preparation for their spring concert on May 2.  

Recitals offer a peek into the world of our college musicians

April is jammed with college recitals of all sorts, many not even held in our halls. We encourage the community to hear our young musicians as they hone their skills for future careers in performance and education! A few examples:
–A graduate brass trio with Matt Onstad, trumpeter (also a member of the Wisconsin Brass Quintet); Melvin Cortez Jackson, a hornist, and Brett Keating, on the euphonium. They’ll play music of Poulenc, Beethoven, Hovhaness, and David Sampson’s “Duncan Trio.” Wednesday, April 6, 6:30 PM in Morphy Hall.
–Third year undergrad pianist Emili Earhart, a student of Christopher Taylor’s, will perform the Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano, by John Cage. Sunday, April 10, 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall.
–Soprano Yanzelmalee Rivera, a graduate student of Elizabeth Hagedorn’s who hails from Puerto Rico, will sing works of Robert Schumann, Joseph Marx and Debussy, accompanied by graduate collaborative piano student ChanMi Jean. ChanMi Jean studies with Prof. Martha Fischer. Saturday, April 16, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall.
Many more recitals may be found on our calendar: http://www.music.wisc.edu/events/2016-04/

April recital also showcases youth in the school’s Community Music Lessons program

From Samantha Sinai, Community Music Lessons Coordinator
The UW-Madison School of Music is pleased to announce an upcoming recital on Sunday, April 17th from 11:00-12:30 p.m. in Morphy Hall. This is not your typical School of Music recital, as our students will not be the ones performing. Instead, they are excited for students of their own to perform.

A youthful student takes lessons with a School of Music student. (File photo)
A youthful student takes lessons with a School of Music student. (File photo)

The recital will feature students on a variety of instruments. For example, Ian, a 12-year-old guitar student of Erik Gibelyou, will perform a piece by Leo Brouwer. Bobby, a 10-year-old violin student of Isidora Miranda, will also perform. In the future, we hope to offer a recital at the end of each semester to allow students a chance to share with the community how they have grown musically throughout the semester. We hope you’ll join us in celebrating the joy of music and the progress these students have made this semester.  And please join us for a reception after the performances!

The Community Music Lessons program (CML) at UW-Madison provides music lessons on most instruments, from piano to trombone. This spring, CML enrolled 98 students, twice as many as last spring, and employed 33 School of Music students as the instructors. CML is very excited to have so many students this year; we look forward to attracting even more in the fall.

Pro Arte Quartet, Wingra Wind Quintet, the UW Varsity Band and UW Symphony also on tap this month

The Wingra Wind Quintet offers an all-French program, Sunday, April 3 at 7:00 PM in Morphy Hall.

The Pro Arte Quartet performs music of Respighi and Korngold: Sunday, April 10, 4:00 PM, Mills Hall.

April 14, 15 and 16: Our own Varsity Band, conducted by Michael Leckrone, plays in the Kohl Center. Buy tickets here.

The UW Symphony Orchestra will play the Overture to Der Freischütz (Carl Maria von Weber); Wesendonck Lieder (Richard Wagner); and Symphony No. 6 (Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky) with guest conductor Andreas Stohr. Friday, April 22, 8:00 PM, Mills Hall.

Clara, Fresco Opera’s spring show, features singers from the School of Music

Alumna Christina Kay (MM 2014) is only one of several graduates to perform in this weekend’s Fresco Opera show, Clara (April 1-3, Overture Center). Others include Melanie Cain (MM 2003, DMA 2005), artistic director and founder of Fresco Opera Theatre, owner of Maven Vocal Arts, and vice president of the Wisconsin chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing; Chelsie Propst (MM, voice 2012, DMA minor in voice 2013); and Meghan Hilker, a current master’s voice student.

Fresco_Clara

The production features the music of Clara and Robert Schumann and Brahms, and centers around their alleged love triangle. Writes Christina: “For those of you unfamiliar with Fresco, they do ‘opera’ in a unique way, often incorporating dialogue and mashing together music from various operas and composers. This is the first time they’ll be using non-operatic songs to create their own story, and it should be really beautiful. A great intro to the genre of “art song,” for those unfamiliar.”

“Transformations” earns praise from area reviewers

For those who had not heard, last month’s opera, Transformations, was well-received by Madison’s critical community. “[David] Ronis’s direction (he also serves as visiting director of the opera program) is richly inventive, with snippets of choreography throughout, including a conga line and a parody of the Supremes. The staging is delightful, using the full height of the set to frame and reframe action,” Isthmus’s Jay Rath writes. “This entire production would easily compare well to any professional opera company.”   Read story here: http://isthmus.com/arts/stage/university-opera-transformations/


Alumni News: Eli Kalman releases new CD
Faculty News: Violist Sally Chisholm named Germain Prévost Professor of Music

New on SoundCloud: “Luminosity,” by Anthony DiLorenzo, as performed by the Festival Brass Choir at last fall’s Brass Fest II. Stay tuned for news of a third Brass Festival in late September!

Next issue: News about our upcoming Jazz Festival, Choral Union, “Performing the Jewish Archive,” and a guest concert with the U.S. Air Force’s “Freedom Winds” woodwind/percussion quintet