Category Archives: Ethnomusicology

School of Music pioneers new course on Japanese music

November 21, 2017

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Scroll down to see a partial list of additional second-semester courses (including String Literature, West African Dance & Music, and Electro-Acoustic Ensemble) offered at the School of Music. 

An Exploration of Japanese Music, from Traditional to Avante-Garde

Having taught one year already at the School of Music, musicology instructor Matthew Richardson (Ph. D, Northwestern University, 2016) isn’t brand new here. But we’d like to introduce you to him nonetheless, especially as he’s developed an innovative class in Japanese music history musicology that is now open to enrollment.

“Music in Japan”   (Music 660-402, Music Cultures of the World: Asia) will offer students an overview of the stylistic and historical depth of music in Japan, including traditional genres like classical court culture, kabuki, and geisha performance, as well as modern J-pop, film music, and anime music. A major theme will be to position Japanese music culture within global trends from China, Korea, the US, and beyond.  The class will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:55 to 10:45 in Room 2441, Humanities. For music majors, the class will fulfill a world music requirement. For non-majors, the class will fulfill a distribution requirement.

We asked Matt to tell us the story behind his interest in Japanese music.

I got into Japanese music in a sort of round-about way. I had studied Japanese as a hobby during a gap year before graduate school. After I started grad school, I was writing a paper on some German synthpop* and came across a Japanese group called Perfume. They put together a lot of retro synthpop sounds with the really pop-y choreography that’s popular in Japan, and once I started trying to figure out what to make of them it snowballed into a dissertation on Japanese pop. One thing that drew me to the subject was that a lot of groups like Perfume work on many levels at once. On the surface level, they’re just really fun synthpop, but when you dig deeper there are references to obscure synthpop from the ‘70s, and sometimes even when they’re performing on a TV commercial or something, they sort of poke fun at advertising while they’re advertising something. It manages to be really simple but really complex at the same time.

“Japanese pop music has a lot of influence from European and American pop music, but at the same time some music styles mean something different in Japan than they do in Europe and the US. In other words, what Japanese hear in Japanese music is different from what Americans often hear in Japanese music. And when Japanese fans listen to American music, it often means something different to them, too. One good example might be punk rock. In the US, that sort of sound is associated with rebellion and counterculture. But in Japan, a lot of artists use it as simply an energetic, youthful style without intending any of the political and meanings it has in the US.

“Since I wrote the original description I’ve added a unit on Japanese artists who tour in the US, and American artists who tour in Japan, talking about why they do or do not catch on. One of the issues we’ll look at is how a lot of the Japanese singers who do sound more ‘American’ (like Thelma Aoyama and Utada Hikaru) flop in the US because they sound too ‘normal,’  but really eccentric pop groups (like Kyary Pamyu Pamyu or Babymetal) often go viral in the US and then only later catch on in Japan.

“There actually aren’t any musicologists that specialize in anime, that I know of. That part of the class will be reading a lot of general things on anime in Japan, and then spitballing some of my ideas about how those ideas apply to how music works in anime. One of the takeaways will be that anime is all about creating these big, sweeping fantasy worlds, and each series or studio usually grabs onto one kind of music that somehow fits with the fantasy, whether it’s jazz or synthesizer music.”

*”Synthpop”???

“Sorry, sometimes I forget how much jargon is floating around in my head! Synthpop is a term for pop music that’s mostly played with keyboards and synthesizers, especially when there’s a little bit of a disco-ish beat (like A-ha or Devo back in the 70s/80s).”


Learn more about “Music in Japan” and other music courses available this spring by checking the “Public Search” option at this website.

A smattering of other courses offered next spring include the following. (Please note: check with the instructor as not all classes are open to general students and auditors):

  • MUSIC 416: Survey of Music in the Twentieth Century with Professor Susan C. Cook
  • MUSIC 542: Choral Literature and Performance Practices of Today with Associate Director of Choral Conducting Bruce Gladstone
  • MUSIC 546: String Literature with Artist-in-Residence and Pro Arte Quartet Violinist Suzanne Beia
  • MUSIC 319: Topics in Music and Ethnicity in the United States (Delta Blues) with Professor Charles Dill
  • MUSIC 318: Cultural Cross Currents: West African Dance/Music in the Americas with Associate Professor of Dance Christopher Walker

and a variety of Special Topics courses (all MUSIC 497):

  • Opera Production with Assistant Professor David Ronis
  • Electro-Acoustic Ensemble with Associate Professor Daniel Grabois
  • Advanced Aural Skills: From the Conservatoire with Professor Marc Vallon
  • Marching Band Techniques with Assistant Director of Bands  Darin Olson
  • Acting for Singers with Assistant Professor David Ronis
  • Jazz Innovators: Armstrong, Ellington and Beyond with Adjunct Professor Matthew Endres
  • Music, Critical Pedagogy = Social Change with Associate Professor Teryl Dobbs

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

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Welcome back, everyone!

Welcome to the 2017-2018 academic year at the Mead Witter School of Music!

We hope you had an enjoyable, relaxing and productive summer.  We’re ready to begin the fall semester with plenty of news and events.

New faculty

Introducing Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet; Alex Noppe, adjunct professor of trumpet; Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz drums & jazz history; Timothy Hagen, adjunct professor of flute; David Scholl, instructor of double bass; and Chad Hutchinson, adjunct professor of instrumental conducting, director of orchestras and conductor of University Opera.  Read their biographies here.

New digital music studio

This fall, the Mead Witter School of Music will add a new studio to Humanities: the Electro-Acoustic Research Space (EARS). Located in a former classroom, EARS will be stuffed with the latest electronic music equipment, and will be available to faculty, students, and collaborators within the School of Music and in other departments. Read the announcement here.

Grand opening: Friday, September 15, 7:30 PM, Room 2401 (street level), Mosse Humanities Building, 455 North Park Street.

Prof. Dan Grabois in the new EARS studio, being interviewed by a writer from the local weekly, Isthmus.

Ten Years of the Perlman Piano Trio!

Last spring marked the tenth year of the Perlman Piano Trio, a student ensemble founded and supported by Kato Perlman. Learn more about the history of the trio with this special slideshow.

https://spark.adobe.com/page-embed.jsTen Years of the Perlman Piano Trio

New book about the Pro Arte Quartet

Local historian emeritus and classical music reviewer John W. Barker has penned an authoritative biography of the Pro Arte Quartet, with a comprehensive look at the members and the music.  Titled “The Pro Arte Quartet: A Century of Musical Adventure on Two Continents,” it is the first full biography of the quartet, which is comprised of members David Perry, Suzanne Beia, Sally Chisholm, and Parry Karp. The 353-paged book, published by Boydell & Brewer, Limited, will be available for purchase on November 15th. The book was commissioned in 2011 by the School of Music. Learn more here.

Music Education program scores high in online magazine

College Magazine, an online publication founded as a print magazine in 2007 by a student at the University of Maryland, placed UW-Madison above such luminaries as Johns Hopkins and Berklee.

The Madison approach to music ed emphasizes community outreach, research, and social justice, says Associate Professor Teryl Dobbs, chair of the music education program. “We recently created an entire revision of the entire undergraduate music ed degree and teacher licensure program… for 21st century students and the diverse students that our own students will teach,”  Dobbs said.  The story was sponsored by the National Association of Music Merchants.  Read the story here.

Over the past several years, Prof. Dobbs has traveled the world presenting her research into the Holocaust and music education as part of the “Performing the Jewish Archive” project. In Vienna last spring, she joined with former visiting professor Elizabeth Hagedorn to present ideas on curriculum revisions to develop deeper understandings of music outside the usual university canon.

On Sept. 17, hear Prof. Dobbs along with Prof. Rachel Brenner of the Center for Jewish Studies and Jessica Kasinski, recent DMA graduate, in a “University of the Air” program with Emily Auerbach and Norman Gilliland. “Why Teach the Holocaust?” will air from 4 to 5 PM on the Ideas Network of Wisconsin Public radio. It will be archived at https://www.wpr.org/programs/university-air

This September, Prof. Dobbs will travel to South Africa for more presentations and eventsRead about “Performing the Jewish Archive” here.

New classes offered this fall

The School of Music will offer two new classes this fall. Please contact the instructor (click the name below) to learn if you may register or possibly audit. Non-majors are welcome.

Music 497 – Jazz History

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 AM- 12:15 PM, room 2411 Humanities. With Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz history & drums
This course focuses on cultural influences on the western development of jazz. By exploring historical and ethnographic works by scholars in ethnomusicology, history, anthropology, and communication, this course examines cultural aspects that influenced traditional and contemporary genres of jazz. Along with learning about the music that has influenced today’s popular genres through interactive participation and conversation, you’ll also develop tools to create case & field studies to study music through culture, and vice versa. Limit: 30 students.

Music 268, Lab 3 – Drumming the World Ensemble

Wednesdays, 1:20 to 3:15 PM, room 1321 Humanities.  Open to all  students; required for music education majors.

With Todd Hammes, percussion instructor. Drumming the World Ensemble is a structured drum circle wherein the music will be created by the class based on the study and application of drumming traditions from around the world. Instruments provided and will include Djembe, Conga, Dumbek, Darabuka, Bells, Rattles, and found objects. Limit: 15 students.

Upcoming concerts – September only

For future listings, please click here for our concert calendar. Our semesters are very full!

Concerts are free admission unless otherwise indicated.

Canceled: Annual Labor Day Karp Family concert

Faculty Recital: Mimmi Fulmer, voice, with guest pianist Craig Randal Johnson. September 10 @ 1:30 pm. Music celebrating Finland’s 100th anniversary of independence.

Faculty Recital: Paul Rowe, voice; Martha Fischer, piano. September 15 @ 8:00 pm.  A program of German art songs, in partnership with the German Department.

Faculty Recital: Jeanette Thompson, soprano, with guests Thomas Kasdorf, piano; and Paul Rowe, baritone. September 22 @ 7:00 pm. Lieder and spirituals.

Faculty Recital: Christopher Taylor, piano. September 23 @ 8:00 pm. $5 – $15. SOM students and faculty free admission.

Christopher Taylor performing in Mills Hall, Feb. 2015. Photo by Michael R. Anderson.

Pro Arte Quartet – September 24 @ 7:30 pm.  David Perry and Suzanne Beia, violin; Sally Chisholm, viola; and Parry Karp, cello.
An all-Mozart program with guest cellist Jean-Michel Fonteneau
and guest clarinetist Alicia Lee.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a 24-page newsletter/calendar that is printed and mailed every August. To receive a copy, click here to send us your postal address in an email.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Final Concerts: UW Choral Union, UW Symphony, Jazz; Jewish Archive; and more!

April 18, 2016
Greetings from the School of Music!  We’re overflowing with concerts the next two weeks; here are just a few highlights. Click here to see the entire calendar.
Choral Union presents Joseph Haydn’s “The Creation”

Beverly Taylor, conductor

Mills Hall, Sunday, April 24, 3:30 PM

Poster design by Tonka Raycheva

Haydn’s “The Creation,” written between 1797 and 1798, is considered one of the great masterworks of western music and civilization.  It has beautiful and exciting choral writing, demanding, intricate and soaring solos, and some of the most inventive orchestral writing of its time, both in the opening depiction of Chaos—the pre-creation state, and in the pictorial writing about animals, water, and light, all at their beginning stages.  Part I depicts the stages of creation, Part II a celebration of that creation, and Part III the new love between Adam and Eve.

“The Creation” debuted in London and was sung in English.  Our production uses the Robert Shaw version of the English text, which clears up some of the original strange grammar which resulted from the Haydn’s libretto going through a German translation and back to English. The libretto mixes Biblical language with new language for the soloists.

Our soloists include alumna Jamie-Rose Guarrine, as angels Gabriel and Eve; Voice Professor James Doing as angel Uriel; alumnus  Benjamin Schultz as angel Raphael; and current student Benjamin Li as Adam.

Tickets: $15 general public, $8 students. Buy online here or in person at the Memorial Union Box Office or at the door.

UW Symphony Orchestra with Guest Conductor Andreas Stoehr

Mills Hall, Friday, April 22, 8:00 PM- Free concert

Andreas Stoehr rehearses the UW Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Hannah Olson.
Andreas Stoehr rehearses the UW Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Hannah Olson.

Vienna native Andreas Stoehr will lead the university orchestra in performances of Overture to Der Freischütz (Carl Maria von Weber), Wesendonck Lieder (Richard Wagner), and Symphony No. 6 (Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky). With soprano Elizabeth Hagedorn.

“At first glance our program appears to be a nice bouquet of romantic pieces, but as I believe that music and philosophy share the same spiritual source, one can see that each composer tries to answer the main question: ‘Where is the exit from the burden of life?’ ” says Prof. Stoehr.

“Carl Maria von Weber’s answer: ‘There is God, there is hope, therefore good wins over evil.’ Wagner leads us to ‘unbewusst, höchste Lust’ (unaware, sublime desire; the last lines of Tristan and Isolde ) expressing his belief in uncontrollable, germinating power of love. The poetry by Mathilde Wesendonck, Wagner’s muse, reflects their profound, but impossible relationship and inspired him to Tristan and Isolde as his unique philosophy of escaping the world through an idealized love. Tchaikovsky’s ‘Pathétique’ Symphony No. 6  does not try at all to answer the question. We sense in his music his personal struggle between good and evil, right and wrong, light and darkness. Like the most famous literary works of his time by Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky, Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece comes to us as a drama, but without words. When life is over – it’s over.”

Hear Andreas Stoehr on Wisconsin Public Radio’s “The Midday” with Norman Gilliland, noon on Wednesday, April 20.

Jazz Week with LA saxophonist Bob Sheppard

Nine area high schools to participate in final concert

April 26, 28, 29 – Various times and locations

The Jazz Studies program, led by Professor Johannes Wallmann, will present a weeklong residency with LA-based Bob Sheppard, worldwide multi-woodwind performer, recording artist, and jazz musician.

Bob Sheppard. Photograph by Suzuki K.
Bob Sheppard. Photograph by Suzuki K.

The three-day event includes master classes and two concerts. It will feature the UW Jazz Ensembles, the UW Jazz Orchestra, the UW High School Honors Jazz Band, and the Johannes Wallmann Quartet.  The 2016 Honors Jazz Band, directed by UW Director of Jazz Studies Johannes Wallmann and co-conductor Eric Siereveld, is a twenty-member big band that includes top jazz students from Edgewood, James Madison Memorial, Madison East, Madison West, Middleton, New Glarus, Portage, Sun Prairie, and Waunakee High Schools.

Events:
Free Master Class/Concert Tue, April 26, 8 PM, Morphy Hall (with the Composers Septet & Contemporary Jazz Ensemble)
Concert Thur, April 28, 8 PM, Morphy Hall (with the Johannes Wallmann Quartet) Ticketed $15 single
Concert Fri, April 29, 8 PM, Music Hall (with the UW Jazz Orchestra & High School Honors Jazz Band) Ticketed $15 single

$25 both Thursday and Friday shows. Students of all ages free!

Buy tickets to Thursday’s show.

Buy tickets to Friday’s show.

Buy tickets to both shows.


 

U.S. Air Force “Freedom Winds” percussion/wind quintet to perform April 21 – Free concert

Music Hall, Thursday, April 21, 7:30 PM

FWindslogo

The School of Music is honored to present the Freedom Winds, a visiting ensemble from the United States Air Force Band of Mid-America. Composed of six virtuoso Airman Musicians, the group adds percussion to the traditional woodwind quintet instrumentation to enhance standard literature and increase their musical capabilities. Repertoire includes jazz and ragtime classics along with popular themes from Broadway’s hit shows to Hollywood’s greatest films.  Please join us for what promises to be a fun and memorable concert!

“Out of the Shadows” Rediscovering Jewish Music, Literature and Theater

May 1-5, 2016, Madison, various locations and times

“Piecing together lost generations of creativity”: that’s how the Wisconsin State Journal’s Gayle Worland phrased it in her news story last summer. Generations of Jewish creativity lost due to the Holocaust and the diaspora, now placed front and center in a worldwide effort to discover those that were lost, reclaim those that are forgotten, and perform those that have been neglected.

From May 1 through May 5, that creativity will be on display in Madison as part of “Out of the Shadows,” coordinated by music education professor Teryl Dobbs and faculty at the University of Leeds, England. Over five days, events ranging from cabaret to ethnomusicology discussions to chamber music to theater will be presented at various locations in Madison. Ticket prices range from $5 to $10.00. Buy tickets here.

PJA-2016-flyer

The three-year “Performing the Jewish Archive” project involves a large number of partners, exploring archives, delivering community and educational projects, holding at least two international conferences and a series of symposia at the British National Library, as well as mounting five international performance festivals––in the United States (Madison, WI), the Czech Republic, South Africa, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

Download the full schedule here (PDF)

Or check our online link: http://www.music.wisc.edu/performing-the-jewish-archive-may-2016-events/


Faculty News: Parry Karp

Student News: Claire Powling, Grace Subat



PHOTO GALLERY     A Day in the Life of a Music School: A master class with composer and cellist Paul Desenne, April 11, 2016. Images by Michael R. Anderson.


 

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

A Taste of the Middle East Coming to Morphy Hall

Special Concert Announcement from the UW-Madison School of Music – March 3, 2016
duoJalal – A fusion of cultures and styles, with Yousif Sheronick, percussion, and Kathryn Lockwood, viola

In Concert: Monday, March 14, 7:30 PM, Morphy Hall

$15 public, available at the Memorial Union Box Office and at the door. Free to students. Note: Seating is limited. We recommend patrons buy ahead of time or arrive early.

duoJalal_Anja HitzenberSMALL
Kathryn Lockwood and Yousif Sheronick. Photograph by Anja Hitzenber.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yousif Sheronick, a native of Iowa,  discovered the music of Arabian countries when his Lebanon-born mother sang tunes over the drone of the family vacuum cleaner. As a youth, he gravitated toward American rock and was a member of the local drum corps. His natural percussion skills landed him a full scholarship to the University of Iowa, but it wasn’t until he enrolled as a master’s student at Yale University that he really dug into the music of Eastern countries. He traveled to Brazil and studied music of India, Africa and the Middle East.

Kathryn Lockwood, a native of Australia, studied classical viola at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music and came to the US in 1991, where she received a master’s degree at the University of Southern California. She then won several awards in succession: the Naumburg Chamber Music Award, Grand Prize at the Coleman Chamber Music Competition, Concert Artists Guild Management Award, and awards at solo competitions such as the Primrose Competition, Washington International Competition, and the Pasadena Instrumental Competition.  She was an original member of the Pacifica Quartet and co-formed the Lark Quartet in 1985. Along the way she met Sheronick.

The two met, married and formed a new ensemble, duoJalal, that spanned cultures, genres and styles.  “duoJalal started organically when a friend and composer offered to write us a piece,” says Sheronick. “We had so much fun we decided to keep going and commissioned more pieces which showcases our unique voice as an ensemble of melody & rhythm.”

Hear duoJalal on SoundCloud:

“duoJalal” was named to honor the cross-cultural poetry of the 13th-century Turkish poet, Jalal al-Din Rumi, whose work Sheronick discovered when he arrived in New York City.

Today, duoJalal performs music ranging from classical to Klezmer, jazz to Middle Eastern. Wrote Toronto Star reviewer John Terauds: “Sheronick applies impeccable technique to a wide range of percussion tools, from the bodhran in the opening piece to a goat-hoof shaker in Glass’s ‘Duo for Solo Viola and Percussion.’ Lockwood is all slow, sensuous allure with her bowing arm one moment, a tempest of notes the next. If this is what world music’s future holds, bring on the party.”

At the School of Music, duoJalal’s concert was suggested by percussion professor Anthony di Sanza and viola professor Sally Chisholm, the long-standing violist with the . “They sit halfway between the Western classical world and global music, and that’s a world I find interesting,” says Di Sanza. “Yousif plays a lot of Middle Eastern percussion music, and we have a good number of students who have been playing Middle Eastern instruments and studying this regularly. And I also like the idea of collaboration with the string area, and with Sally Chisholm.”

“I am certain she will give wonderful feedback to our violists on standard viola repertoire as well as offer her unique perspective on paths musicians can create for themselves,” says Chisholm.

Additional Events:
String Master Class: Mon March 14, 12:05 PM, Room 2521- Free
Percussion Master Class: Mon March 14, 12:05 PM, Room 1629 -Free
Presentation/Discussion about Composing Global Chamber Music: Tuesday, March 15, 12PM, Room 2521 – Free

We hope you will join us for one or more events!
Here is the March 14 concert program:

  • David Krakauer (b. 1956): Klezmer a la Bechet (in the SoundCloud link above)
  • Evan Ziporyn (b.1959): Honey from Alast
  • Yousif Sheronick (b.1967): Jubb Jannin
  • Enzo Rao (b.1957): A Different World
  • Kenji Bunch (b.1973): Lost & Found (2010)
    I. Lost in Time (Dumbek)
    II. Found Objects (Djembe)
  • Somei Satoh (b.1947): Birds in warped time II (1983)
  • Giovanni Sollima (b.1962): Lamentatio

For more information, please contact the concert manager at 608. 263.5615.

We thank the University of Wisconsin Anonymous Fund for its support of this residency.

 

 

 

“Sensual” soprano returns for Opera Benefit; “Buena Vista Social Club” legend on campus to teach and perform

Coloratura soprano Brenda Rae returns to alma mater to raise funds for University Opera

Gazing at herself in a bewitched mirror, she is obsessed with her radiant beauty; she caresses her own face and simpers at an imagined lover. That would be Brenda Rae in Seattle Opera’s February production of Handel’s “Semele,” where she was described by Opera News as “sensual,” “dazzling,” and “moving.”

Above: Brenda sings “Myself I shall adore” in Seattle Opera’s Semele.

Discover the dazzle for yourself on September 27, when Appleton native and School of Music/Juilliard alumna Brenda Rae – who has spent most of the last decade performing in Frankfurt, Berlin and other major European opera halls  – visits Mills Hall at 7:30 PM to sing a benefit concert for University Opera. She’ll be paired with the UW Symphony Orchestra as she sings Gliere’s Concerto for Coloratura Soprano, having just finished a run in Milwaukee Symphony’s Cosi fan Tutti.  She’ll then fly to Paris’s  du Théâtre des Champs-Elysées to sing Zerbinetta in Richard Strauss’s Ariadne auf Naxos. 

Brenda’s return is part of a larger three-day fund drive to place University Opera – which has existed at UW-Madison for 57 years, but relies mostly on ticket sales and donations to finance productions  – on secure financial footing. On Friday, there will be a free master class in Music Hall from 5-7 PM. On Saturday, two special donor events are planned: the first, a VIP dress rehearsal followed by a private University Club reception for event sponsors. The weekend’s events comprise a fund drive that honors opera alumna Karen K. Bishop, who passed away in January. Her husband, Charlie Bishop, donated $500,000 to the opera program in her name, now matched by a $1 million gift from the Morgridge Fund and local supporters. Read a story in the Wisconsin State Journal about the larger effort.

Brenda Rae. Photo credit: Kristin Hoebermann.

You are invited to join the many others in Madison who love opera and who have supported University Opera for all or part of its history. Please consider becoming a sponsor:

The Impresario
$250–$499
Includes admission for you and one guest to the private University Club reception with Brenda Rae on Saturday and two tickets to the Sunday concert in a prime seating area.

The Prima Donna
$500–$999
Includes the benefits of the Impresario level, plus your name(s) will appear in the concert program as a master class sponsor.

The Bishop Circle
$1,000 or more
Includes the benefits of the Prima Donna level, plus your name(s) will appear in the concert program as a concert sponsor. You and one guest will also receive admission to the VIP dress rehearsal on Saturday.

Table Sponsorship
Give a gift of $2,500 or more, and you will receive a reserved table in your name for a maximum of eight people at the private University Club reception on Saturday. This includes all the benefits of the Bishop Circle level for the named sponsor, so your name will appear in the concert program at the Bishop Circle level.

– See more at: http://www.uwalumni.com/event/brendarae/#sthash.gcqNtse2.dpuf

Tickets for the Sunday evening concert are $25 for adults, and are available online now; they will also be sold at the door, day of show. Students are free. We invite you to pack Mills Hall and see her now… before she hits the stratosphere!


Legendary “Buena Vista Social Club” musician Juan de Marcos here to teach, perform and inspire

UW-Madison will host legendary Cuban musician, Juan de Marcos González, a driving force behind the Buena Vista Social Club, as the Fall 2015 Arts Institute’s Interdisciplinary Artist in Residence.

Juan de Marcos Gonzalez. Photo credit Tom Ehrlich.
Juan de Marcos Gonzalez. Photo credit Tom Ehrlich.

During his residency, notable Cuban artists and groups including Afro-Cuban All Stars, Telmary Diaz, Pellejo Seco, and musical members of his family (who also are part of Afro-Cuban All Stars) will perform in Madison. He will present numerous lectures on the history of Cuban music and teach a lecture course called “Afro-Cuban Music: Roots, Jazz, Hip Hop” and a production course “Music Production: Afro-Cuban and Hip Hop Music.” A complete schedule of classes and performances is listed at this website: http://artsinstitute.wisc.edu/iarp/juandemarcos/

Juan de Marcos González was born in Havana, Cuba and grew up surrounded by music. As a musician, composer, and producer, it is his mission to showcase the wealth, diversity, and vitality of Afro-Cuban music to the world. Through his work with the Afro-Cuban All Stars, the Buena Vista Social Club, Rubén González, Ibrahim Ferrer, Sierra Maestra, and others, he has made an extraordinary contribution to raising the profile of Cuban music throughout the world. He has been nominated for a Latin Billboard Award and multiple times for Grammy Awards. During his career, Juan de Marcos has arranged, conducted, produced/co-produced, and/or performed on more than twenty-five albums.

Juan de Marcos González’s residency is presented by the UW-Madison Arts Institute and is hosted by the School of Music and the Office of Multicultural Arts Initiatives (OMAI). Additional co-sponsors and supporters are listed here.


The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.

Personalize your calendar view! Click on the “view as” link on the right of our calendar page.

Untitled


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

 

New professor Jerome Camal augments growing “global music studies” program

Interviewed by Nicole Tuma, MM 2014 flute & voice

With the appointment of Professor Jerome Camal, a faculty appointment in the Department of Anthropology, this semester marked a new beginning for ethnomusicology at UW-Madison’s School of Music.  The new initiative, a “global music studies” program, examines music’s constitution as a cultural force woven into the social and political fabric. The program was the brainchild of professor Ronald Radano, Professor of Musicology and Ethnomusicology and Senior Fellow at the Institute for Research in the Humanities, and former UW ethnomusicologist R. Anderson Sutton, now Dean of the School of Pacific and Asian Studies and Assistant Vice Chancellor for International and Exchange Programs at the University of Hawaii-Mānoa.

Jerome Camal.
Jerome Camal.
Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

The university will offer courses and certificates at both the undergraduate and graduate levels with the expectation of initiating formal degrees in the future. It is made possible through support from the Mellon Foundation.

Camal came to Madison from the University of California at Los Angeles, where he was part of the Mellon Postdoctoral Program in the Humanities, Cultures in Transnational Perspective. Prior to that, he studied at Webster University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in jazz studies; then earned a master’s in jazz performance from the University of New Orleans; and followed up with a Ph.D in musicology with an emphasis in ethnomusicology and a certificate in American Culture Studies from Washington University in St. Louis.

Up to 2011, he performed regularly on saxophone,  clarinet and flute as a freelancer in New Orleans and Saint Louis as well as in Guadeloupe and subsequently in France. Now, Camal’s research focuses on music and politics in the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe where he has been studying gwoka, a drum and dance tradition peculiar to that island.

This semester, Professor Camal is offering a graduate-level seminar on the subject of “Caribbean Music: Mobile Sounds, Creole Identities.” Next fall, he teach Anthro 104, Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. In the spring, he’ll teach two music- related seminars in the spring, one of them on the anthropology of dance. His summer plans include writing a book and getting married!

I spoke to him about the intellectual journey that brought him from his home in Nancy, France to the United States, first to pursue a career as a jazz saxophonist, and then to undertake formal academic studies.

When did you decide that you wanted to go into musicology and ethnomusicology? Had it been coming for a while, or was there a moment when you started getting really interested in it?
Well, I realized after a while that the musician’s life and lifestyle was just not for me. I’ve always enjoyed intellectual pursuit, and that was missing from my life. I really enjoyed the artistic stuff, and that was great, but the reality is, when you’re trying to make a living as a musician, a lot of times you end up doing the kind of music that you don’t care about, and you can’t do the music you really care about because you wouldn’t get paid for it. Artistically it wasn’t totally fulfilling, intellectually it was a complete vacuum, and financially it was disastrous, so I decided to apply for a graduate program, and honestly at the time I had no idea what I wanted to do. I initially wanted to do this thing on jazz scenes, but it didn’t sound like a terribly exciting topic. Then I got really interested in the Civil Rights Movement, and I started to do a little bit of research on the SNCC Freedom Singers. SNCC (the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) had these vocal groups that raised money. And I wrote a paper about them, and I began to contact some of them, I was gung-ho, I was going to do some interviews…and then Ingrid Monson came out with a book about jazz in the Civil Rights Movement, right then.  “Well, there goes that idea,” I thought.  And then eventually I found all of this stuff going on in the Caribbean, and because I am bilingual I was in a really good position to do this work.

So you found your way to the study of Caribbean music through jazz?
Well yes, sort of. When I went down to Guadeloupe to do my field work the first time, my idea was to work on the musicians who mixed the local traditions with jazz, and then when I got down there I interviewed a lot of musicians, but they were saying, “Stop with your jazz crap already, why don’t you just focus on our music?” And I discovered that there were some really interesting things going on politically, and that music played a big part in the political questions that were being debated in Guadeloupe. Now I’ve gone 360 degrees because I’m actually working on a big paper on jazz and gwo ka, which is the traditional music. What I’m looking at is the power relationships that are taking place when you have American musicians who go down to Guadeloupe and work with local musicians there, and then they put out a CD. What happens? Who gets to control what the music sounds like, whose name is actually out there?

You’ve also taught some classes on popular music.
That’s the reality of a teaching position, right? I taught at UCLA for a few years, which is a program that’s really into popular music, so one of the courses that I had proposed was on Caribbean popular music, and especially on a side-by-side study of hip hop, Jamaican dance hall and reggaeton. So they thought that I was a popular music person, and so they asked me to teach the history of rock ‘n roll, so I became a rock ‘n roll guy. I did that twice, and I really, really enjoyed it. This year, I’m on the committee for the International Association for the Study of Popular Music conference, and it feels like a good fit. The questions that people who study popular music are asking are the questions that I am interested in learning about.

Jazz, the Caribbean, rock ‘n roll…how did your appointment as an anthropology professor come about?
I was the first hire in Ron Radano’s plan to put together the Global Music Studies Initiative, and they had a really well-defined job announcement. They were looking for someone who did African Diaspora, either the Caribbean or Latin America. It just fit very well with what I do. I’m really happy; I love the anthropology department. It’s cool, because I get to learn something new. It’s also very liberating to teach courses that have nothing to do with music. When I was at UCLA the very first class that I taught was a graduate seminar on music and nationalism, and now, this coming semester I’m going to do a seminar just on ethnicity and nationalism where I may talk about music at some point, but it’s an anthropology course, so I can really deal with some of the theories and read more stuff, read it differently, and not necessarily worry about applying them to music. I’m also affiliated with the School of Music; half of my teaching has to be cross-listed with the School of Music so that I can continue to contribute to the ethnomusicology curriculum. I’m also affiliated with LACIS (Latin American Cultural and Iberian Studies).

Beyond music and anthropology, what are you interested in bringing to the classroom?
I received a Madison Institute for Learning Excellence Fellowship to help me develop hybrid pedagogical tools for bringing technology into the classroom, especially in large, lecture-based courses, and using social media tools in the classroom, figuring out how to use these technologies to actually increase student engagement in lectures that can be totally boring and impersonal.

What sort of tools do you think have the most potential in that respect?
I’ve experimented with Twitter. I created an account for a class, and students would tweet questions, or I would ask them something and I’d ask them to tweet answers back. And I would periodically check the feed and answer questions orally during the class. And then after class we would keep the conversations going. We’d sometimes exchange videos, or articles that we found – you know web pages, anything. That was pretty successful, so I’m probably going to continue working with that. There are also instant polling websites…it’s basically the idea of a clicker, but much more sophisticated because you can ask students to type full sentences. My attitude is, “If you’re going to be on your computer, I’m going to disrupt your Facebooking by asking you to do things online that actually have something to do with what we’re talking about.” Not only do we have professors who are not good at thinking or knowing about some of the things that can be done with these tools, but we have a lot of students that aren’t good at them either. It’s important to think about how to use social media beyond “Here’s a picture of my friends and me at the bar last night,” and to teach students to use online tools like Wikipedia in a way that makes sense.

In terms of your own teaching, what courses are you planning on offering in the future?
I’m not entirely sure. I may end up teaching the “Musics of the World” class. Also, no one is teaching a seminar in ethnomusicological methods right now, so that’s something I’m probably going to do in the future. And I may start to think in terms of undergraduate courses on global popular music. I think that would be fun, and it’s also something that no one is offering right now, so it might be a good idea in terms of relevant courses that could attract a large undergraduate population to the School of Music. I taught a seminar last semester that was an introduction to the anthropology of the Caribbean which I’m going to be revamping to become a more lecture-based 200- or 300-level course for undergrads, an introduction to the Caribbean as a region. I cannot just offer courses on the Caribbean because there’s not enough interest, so I’m thinking about offering things on popular music, topics in anthropology, theoretical topics in anthropology…I’m really invested in post-colonial studies, so I’ll maybe develop a course along those lines. It sort of depends on what the different departments need and where they’re hoping to go. I hope we can find a happy medium.

Reach Professor Camal on campus:

Office: 5313 Sewell Social Science Bldg.
Email address: camal@wisc.edu

Visit his personal website: http://tanbouolwen.com/

Read more about his research in these books of essays:

American Creoles

Sun, Sea and Sound: Music and Tourism in the Circum-Caribbean

 

 

 

 

“Share the Wonderful” begins second annual fund drive

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As some of you may know, UW-Madison this week began its second “Share the Wonderful”  fundraising campaign, designed to raise money to support students and faculty.
At the School of Music, gifts to the School in particular and Letters and Science more generally have provided countless opportunities to our most talented and ambitious students, to help them grow personally, academically and succeed in their fields. We welcome your contributions.
Over the next two months, we’ll periodically update this blog with stories of how donations have had an impact. Take note: you’ll be hearing from these School of Music students in future years, we have no doubt, as they advance through their lives and careers.
First up is Jacob Wolbert, a senior majoring in percussion, who was a guest blogger while working as a Summer Music Clinic counselor this past June. Jacob then traveled to Brazil to study and will return again in January. Here is his story:
“I received two fellowships over the 2012-13 academic year. The first one was a FLAS (Foreign Language & Area Studies) fellowship that went towards an intensive Portuguese program in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, last summer. With the help of FLAS, I was able to study Brazilian Portuguese and culture in a fascinating environment and meet people from around the rest of the United States and the world.
“The other fellowship, the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hilldale Fellowship, will be used to fund my fieldwork (again, in Rio de Janeiro) for my senior honors thesis in ethnomusicology. Given that my work relies so much on the personal experience of and my own interactions with Brazilian samba musicians, this fellowship has essentially made my ethnographic work possible and provided me with the opportunity to broaden my research and strengthen my thesis.
“After graduation, I plan to take a few years off from school to work in music, education, and languages. Thanks to these scholarships, I have been able to further my love of Brazilian music, develop a better understanding of the Portuguese language, and connect with people across the university and country that I wouldn’t have otherwise been able to connect with. From the summer trip, I will never forget my evenings running down a seaside boulevard in Copacabana with mountains in front of and behind me, the ocean to my left, and the teeming Rio metropolis to my right, the view from each side fitting in with the other three. The best single experience was attending a concert at one of the most famous samba schools, Salgueiro, and singing along with a song I learned as a UW-Madison freshman.”

Jacob Wolbert
Jacob Wolbert at an overlook in Brazil