Category Archives: Faculty News

Watch our concerto winners on video; “Delta Blues” online this summer; “Just Bach” concerts in Madison; Vinyl records stage a comeback

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
www.music.wisc.edu/


Watch our concerto winners talk about the works they’ll play this Sunday at our annual Symphony Showcase

Musically, UW-Madison’s annual concerto competition ranges far and wide. This year, winners included a vocalist (Cayla Rosché, soprano, singing Strauss’s Vier Letzte Lieder, TrV 296); a violinist (Richard Silvers, performing Dvorak’s Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 53); a piano duo (Adalia Hernandez Abrego and Jiawen Zhang, playing Poulenc’s Concerto for Two Pianos in D minor); a composer (Anne McAninch, with the UW-Symphony Orchestra performing her new work, Fanfare for Orchestra); and a bassoonist (Chia-Yu Hsu, who will play Bitsch’s Concertino for Bassoon and Orchestra).

Watch here and join the fun, Sunday, March 10, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Tickets: $12 adults, children and students free, available at the Memorial Union, online and at the door. Learn more here.


New summer offering: “Delta Blues,” with Professor Charles Dill. Now offered online!

Registration begins April 1; check back soon for precise course number.
See course guide here.

This class, first offered by Professor Dill in spring 2017, will now be available online as a four-week summer course. In the class, Dill traces the history of the blues within America’s racial history, beginning with the living conditions that produced the blues in rural Mississippi, and detailing the emergence of blues in the early recording industry (Paramount, OKeh), including the earliest examples (W.C. Handy, Mamie Smith), as well as the singers emerging in the 1920s (Blind Lemon Jefferson, Charley Patton, Robert Johnson). The class then follows migrations northward to Memphis (jug bands) and Chicago (electric blues), traces the emerging importance of radio and live performance (King Biscuit Time, WDIA, the Chittlin’ Circuit) as well as living conditions in Chicago (Maxwell Street). It will track early marketing of blues to white audiences (Josh White, Lead Belly) and end with the reemergence of the blues as ’60s folk music. The course is supplemented with extensive musical selections and documentary footage of interviews and performances.

Mississippi Fred McDowell, 1960. Courtesy WikiCommons.

Musicians travel to Cuban sister city, Camaguey

A group of Madison musicians, including UW-Madison bass instructor Nick Moran, jazz studies director Johannes Wallmann and cellist Meredith Nesbitt traveled to Cuba in January. The American musicians played four concerts with Cuban musicians in addition to workshops and other opportunities.

Read story on Channel 3000.

“Just Bach” in Madison

Sarah Brailey

Doctoral voice candidate Sarah Brailey returned to Wisconsin last fall after ten years in New York City. “One of my favorite parts of my musical life in New York City was how much Bach I had the chance to sing. I regularly sang with the two big liturgical Bach series: Bach Vespers at Holy Trinity Lutheran and Bach at One at Trinity Wall Street. Last spring, just after I had decided I would return to Madison for my doctorate (I got my master’s  here in ’07) I ran into Madison violist, Marika Fischer Hoyt, who was in NYC and was attending a Bach at One concert in which I was soloing. We chatted after the concert about how I was coming back to Madison and wouldn’t it be great if there were a similar free, afternoon Bach series that regularly featured Bach’s wonderful and vast cantata repertoire. She got Paul Rowe and Cheryl Bensman-Rowe on board and the rest is history!”
Other Just Bach artistic staff include Cheryl Bensman-Rowe and Paul Rowe, founders of the Madison Early Music Festival; violist Marika Fischer Hoyt; organist Mark Brampton Smith; violinist and SOM alumna Kangwon Lee Kim; cellist and viola da gamba player James Waldo, a doctoral student at UW-Madison; UW-Madison doctoral tenor Wesley Dunnagan; cellist Anton TenWolde; and violinist Nathan Giglierano, a UW-Madison SOM alumnus.

Next “Just Bach” concert: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 1 PM
On the program:
BWV 4: Christ lag in Todesbanden
JM Bach: Herr, ich warte auf dein Heil
Luther Memorial Church, 1021 University Avenue, Madison

https://justbach.org/


Vinyl Grows in Popularity

From On Wisconsin magazine

“Staff members at Mills Music Library have noticed students’ growing interest in vinyl in recent years. Tom Caw, the music public services librarian, says staff and librarians across the country have reported an increase in people requesting, listening to, or checking out long-playing vinyl.

“ ‘I think part of the allure for the vinyl listening experience is that it’s a physical interaction with a device, and I think people are used to having access online to streaming media,’ ” Caw says. “ ’The interactive physical experience is something you can’t replicate online.’ ”

In case you had not heard, “Record Store Day” is April 13.


Upcoming events-Click links for details

Student-run opera: “The Old Maid and the Thief
Two performances – Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 9, 6:30 PM, Music Hall. Free.

Faculty Recital: Jessica Johnson, solo piano – Works of Female Composers
Friday, March 8 @ 8:00 pm PM, Mills Hall. Free.

Wind Fest with Milwaukee Symphony Guests
Saturday, March 9, Humanities.  Free event. Beginning at 1:30 PM, the afternoon will include master classes in flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon with MSO guests, followed by instrumental choir readings and chamber music master classes with members of the Wingra Wind Quintet, UW’s faculty quintet.
Final concert:
8:00 PM, Mills Hall. David Gillingham’s rarely performed Concerto for Wind Quintet and Wind Ensemble.
Guests:
Heather Zinninger Yarmel, assistant principal flute, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Katherine Young Steele, principal oboe, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
William Helmers, clarinet, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Catherine Chen, principal bassoon, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

The Journey of African-American Song with John Wesley Wright
Saturday, March 9 @ 8:00 PM, Morphy Hall. Free.
For this special event, John Wesley Wright will present a recital of a variety of African-American music including examples of calls and chants, children’s game songs, spirituals and ring shouts, hymns and gospels, civil rights era songs, and contemporary songs. During his three-day residency, he will also present a master class and workshop.

UW Jazz Orchestra
Monday, March 11, 7:30 PM, Memorial Union Play Circle. Free.

Faculty Recital: Julia Rottmayer, soprano and Martha Fischer, piano
March 12 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
Soprano Julia Rottmayer and pianist Martha Fischer present a concert featuring art songs from a mother and child’s perspective.

Wisconsin Brass Quintet
Thursday, March 14 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
Featuring student trumpeter Brighin Kane-Grade performing Simple (Leonard Bernstein and Aaron Copland, arranged by Daniel Schlosberg.
Other works include music of Bernstein, Isaac Albenez, and David Sampson.

Le Domaine Musical with Marc Vallon and friends
Friday, March 15 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
A concert of rarely performed music, including a deeply moving piece by Luciano Berio, O King, written in 1968 after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr.


Our Full Concert Calendar includes recitals, students ensembles, and more

calendar


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Coming up soon: Harbison Viola Sonata; Music of Frigyes Hidas; Percussion Concert with Film, Flowerpots and Drums

February 12, 2019

A very busy two weeks for the Mead Witter School of Music!

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
https://www.music.wisc.edu/

This weekend: World Premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata with Sally Chisholm and pianist Timothy Lovelace

Sunday, February 17, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. $25. Buy tickets here.

Learn about the event here.

The concert includes solo performances by Chisholm and Lovelace and the full Pro Arte Quartet.

Read a recent Isthmus review of the Pro Arte Quartet.

On Sunday, Feb. 10, the Wisconsin State Journal published a story about the upcoming John Harbison events in Madison. Read the story here.


UW Wind Ensemble with soloist Midori Samson

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2:00 PM, Mills Hall.

With Scott Teeple, conductor and Cole Hairston and Ross Wolf, graduate conductors. This concert will be livestreamed. Check this page for updates: https://www.music.wisc.edu/video/

Midori Samson

Presenting doctoral bassoonist Midori Samson, winner of the inaugural Wind Ensemble Concerto Competition. Midori, student of Professor Marc Vallon and recipient of a Collins Fellowship at the school of music, has a secondary focus in social work. She holds roles as second bassoon in the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and principal bassoon in the Beloit-Janesville Symphony. She previously was a fellow in the Civic Orchestra of Chicago and has performed in several Chicago Symphony Orchestra family concerts, as well as with the Austin, Charleston, and New World Symphonies, the National Orchestral Institute, and the Pacific Music Festival. Midori holds degrees from The Juilliard School and the University of Texas at Austin.  Midori will perform the Concerto for Bassoon (1999) of Frigyes Hidas . Click to see full program.


UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, featuring works of composer Augusta Read Thomas

Thursday, February 14, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall – Free

Augusta Read Thomas

With Chad Hutchinson, conductor, and graduate conductors Michael Dolan and Ji Hyun Yim. Click to see full program.

Augusta Read Thomas will be in residence at UW-Madison for this concert. Join us for a master class with Ms. Thomas, Feb. 14, 2:00 to 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall.

Among her many accomplishments, Ms. Thomas founded the University of Chicago’s Center for Contemporary Composition: “a dynamic, collaborative, and interdisciplinary environment for the creation, performance and study of new music and for the advancement of the careers of emerging and established composers, performers, and scholars.” An influential teacher at Eastman, Northwestern, Tanglewood, and Aspen Music Festival, she is only the 16th person to be designated University Professor at the University of Chicago.  From 1997 through 2006, Thomas was Mead Composer-in-Residence with the Chicago Symphony, working with conductors Daniel Barenboim and Pierre Boulez.


UW-Western Percussion Ensemble with guest composer Elliot Cole and percussionist Peter Ferry

Wednesday, February 20, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

Ticketed – Children $7 – Adults $17. Buy tickets here; also sold at door.

Presenting a three-day residency by composer Elliot Cole and percussionist Peter Ferry, who will perform with the UW-Western Percussion Ensemble. Works on the program will include “The Future is Bright” for soloist, film, and percussion ensemble and “Hanuman’s Leap” for percussion group, digital playback, and voice. Learn more here.

Elliot Cole is a composer and “charismatic contemporary bard” (NY Times).  He has performed his music with Grammy winners Roomful of Teeth, Grammy nominees A Far Cry and Metropolis Ensemble, as well as the Chicago Composers Orchestra, New Vintage Baroque, the Lucerne Festival Academy, and as a member of the book-club-band Oracle Hysterical.  His percussion music has been performed by over 250 percussion ensembles all over the world.  In 2017 he was invited by Talks at Google to share his unique approach to music through computer programming.  He is on faculty at New York’s The New School and Juilliard’s Evening Division, and is program director of Musicambia at Sing Sing prison, where he works with a music school for incarcerated men.


University Opera and University Theatre: Sondheim’s Into the Woods

From February 21 through 24, University Theatre and University Opera, in partnership with the Wisconsin Union Theater, will co-present Into the Woods at Shannon Hall in the Memorial Union, marking the first time in twelve years that the Mead Witter School of Music and the Department of Theatre and Drama have collaborated on a production.  David Ronis, Karen K. Bishop director of opera, will direct, and Chad Hutchinson, orchestra director, will conduct.

Five performances are planned: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings at 7:30 PM, and Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.
Read about the show.
Buy tickets here.


Guest Artist: Rhea Olivaccé, soprano, with Martha Fischer, piano

The Black Voice – A Collection of African American Art Songs and Spirituals

Recital: Saturday, February 23, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall
Master class: February 22, 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall
Free and open to the public.
Read more. 


In New York: Laura Schwendinger’s Artemisia

March 5–9, 2019
Trinity Church Wall Street
St. Paul’s Chapel, Broadway and Fulton Street, New York City

The Time’s Arrow Festival continues its commitment to amplifying the voices of female artists across multiple mediums. The festival includes the fully staged world premiere of the new opera Artemisia by UW-Madison faculty composer Laura Schwendinger. Artemisia tells the story of the Baroque artist who portrayed herself as Susanna in her famous painting Susanna and the Elders.

Schwendinger’s “High Wire Act” praised in Boston

From the Boston Classical Review: “If one needed to be reminded that a program of contemporary music can be engaging – even riveting – on its own terms, Collage New Music’s concert’s Sunday night at Pickman Hall was the place to be. CNM music director David Hoose led a reading of High Wire Act that brimmed with personality. Sarah Brady’s realization of Schwendinger’s brilliant flute writing was particularly compelling: precise, nimble, and fiery.” Read the review here.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Famed scholar to illumine Schubert history; New strings scholarship created; Medical Orchestra offers musical balm

January 15, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706

http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Welcome to a New Year!

We hope that everyone enjoyed a safe and pleasant holiday season!

Send your news

Note to Alumni: The Hamel Music Center will open this fall, and we’d like to round up as many alumni stories as possible to include in various formats. Stories may include current occupations, research projects, performances and family information! Please send your updates to this email address.


Medical Orchestra soothes performers as much as patrons

On December 3, the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health presented an inaugural concert of the Medical Orchestra of Wisconsin, performing works by Dvorak, Sibelius, and Schubert.  The orchestra is composed of the school’s medical students, graduate students, faculty, and staff, and was conducted by School of Music graduate conducting assistants Jenny Yim and Michael Dolan (pictured, at the podium). The orchestra’s next concert is planned for April 14 in Mills Hall.


Renowned Schubert scholar Susan Youens to present at annual Schubertiade

Susan Youens, recently retired from the University of Notre Dame, has one of the most impressive musicology resumes in the world, and she’ll visit on January 27 to tell us a story or two about Franz Schubert. Youens has won four fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. She’s written eight books, hundreds of articles, essays and chapters, and lectured all over the world.

“Dr. Youens will explore the rich relationship of Schubert’s music to the poems he chose to set and the emergence of new directions in Schubert’s style,” says co-organizer William Lutes.  “The influence of Beethoven had loomed large throughout Schubert’s music, and in the year following Beethoven’s death, the 31-year-old composer wrote works of homage to this great master, as he saw his own music becoming more widely recognized, published and performed.”

Highlights of our Schubertiade  will be a complete performance of Schubert’s 14 final songs, published after his death as Schwanengesang, or “Swan Songs” – among the composer’s richest and most forward looking works; the humorous and risqué Refrain-Lieder, the slow movement of the great Piano Trio in E-flat major, the enchanting Rondo in A major for piano four-hands; and the beautiful song Auf den Strom for voice, horn and piano, composed for a concert commemorating the first anniversary of Beethoven’s death, and filled with subtly haunting references to Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony.

Our Mills Hall living room, Schubertiade 2014. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

In addition to pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes, our guests will include voice faculty members Mimmi Fulmer, Julia Rottmayer and Paul Rowe, voice students Sarah Brailey, Wesley Dunnagan, and Benjamin Hopkins, graduate hornist Joanna Schultz, and guest singer Cheryl Bensman-Rowe. We are also pleased to present the Perlman Trio (Mercedes Cullen, violin; Micah Cheng, cello; Kangwoo Jin, piano).

We thank our generous donors Ann Boyer and Kato Perlman for their longtime support of our Schubertiades, the Perlman Trio, and other musicians and events.

2019 SCHUBERTIADE SCHEDULE:

Master class with Susan Youens. Thursday, January 24, 4:30 PM, Morphy Hall. (Free)
Pre-concert lecture: 2:00 PM, Sunday, January 27, Morphy Hall. (Free.)
Concert: 3:00 PM, Sunday, January 27, Mills Hall. (Buy tickets here.)
Post-concert reception, included with ticket purchase: Sunday, January 27, University Club, 5:30 PM.

TICKETS: $17 adults, $7 all age students/children. Free to music majors, faculty and staff. To avoid long lines, we suggest arriving 30 minutes early or buying tickets ahead of time, either in person or online. Please see link below.

Purchase options (online, by telephone and in person) here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

To buy tickets directly online, click here.


Announcing The Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship Fund

This new scholarship was created with a generous gift from Dr. Stanley and Mrs. Shirley Inhorn. The fund supports graduate and undergraduate students who study string performance at the Mead Witter School of Music at UW-Madison. Susan C. Cook, director of the School of Music, expressed her thanks to the Inhorns. “Stan and Shirley Inhorn have been great and generous friends to the Madison music community. Their ongoing support of the Mead Witter School of Music will ensure that our wonderful students can realize their musical dreams.”

To make an online gift to the Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship Fund, visit supportuw.org/giveto/StringsScholarship (or click the image above).

To make a gift by mail, please make your check payable to the University of Wisconsin Foundation and note the fund name in the memo line. Send your check to University of Wisconsin Foundation, US Bank Lockbox, Box 78808, Milwaukee, WI 53278-0807.

The Inhorns will be formally recognized at a concert on February 17, featuring the world premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata, performed by the Pro Arte Quartet’s Sally Chisholm and Minneapolis pianist Timothy Lovelace. The full Pro Arte Quartet will also perform.

Sally Chisholm

Read about the Inhorns and this concert.

TICKETS:  Buy tickets ($25) to the world premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata, with Pro Arte violist Sally Chisholm and Minneapolis pianist Timothy Lovelace. The full Pro Arte Quartet will also perform.


Christopher Taylor to perform Liszt, Schubert and Kapustin on February 9

Christopher Taylor. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

Faculty pianist Christopher Taylor, a 1993 bronze medal winner in the Van Cliburn competition, will perform Franz Liszt’s transcription of Beethoven’s Symphony no. 8 in F Major, op. 93. This will be the sixth Lizst transcription of Beethoven’s symphonies that Taylor has performed. Also on the program: Six of Nikolai Kapustin’s 24 Preludes and the Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (“Der Wanderer”) of Franz Schubert.

Following Taylor’s 2017 performance of Liszt’s arrangement of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony plus two other works, musicologist Mark DeVoto wrote this in the Boston Musical Intelligencer: “No other piano recital I’ve heard in the past three years has equaled this one for it combination of excitement, interest, and emotion. I hope Taylor will return early and often with whatever conventional or unconventional repertoire he wishes.”

DeVoto’s wish has come true: Later this year, Taylor will perform the entire Liszt-Beethoven cycle at the Isabella Gardiner Museum in Boston.

Taylor also recently performed in Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Remembering Lenny” program of mid-November.

TICKETS:  $17 adults, $7 all age students/children. Free to music majors, faculty and staff. To avoid long lines, we suggest arriving 30 minutes early or buying tickets ahead of time, either in person or online. Please see link below.

Purchase options (online, by telephone and in person) here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

To buy tickets directly online, click here.


Award Announcements: Jazz Studies Professor Johannes Wallmann and graduate pianist Anna Siampani

UW-Madison’s Division of the Arts provides annual awards for arts achievements and future endeavors. This year, the School of Music is represented twice. Johannes Wallmann, director of jazz studies & associate professor of music, received the Emily Mead Baldwin Award in the Creative Arts. Anna Siampani, graduate pianist studying with Professor Jessica Johnson, received the David and Edith Sinaiko Frank Graduate Fellowship for a Woman in the Arts.

Pianist Anna Siampani

Siampani, a native of Veria, Greece, will use the project award to finance her dissertation research. That project includes first-ever primary source research into the solo piano works of Manolis Kalomiris, a composer born in Smyrna, Greece in 1883, who died in 1962. Kalomiris is seen as the father of modern Greek music. This April, Anna will present two events, a lecture and a recital delving into these works, “demonstrating the characteristic Greek idiom with the complexity and inflection of the folk rhythms, the varying touches of articulation and the flowing pacing of the performance practices. She’ll follow up with a CD recording and accompanying booklet containing analysis of the works.

Over the holiday break, Anna returned to Greece to dig into the libraries at the Manolis Kalomiris Society, The National Conservatory, National Library of Greece, and the Lilian Voudouri Music Library of Greece.


Upcoming concert highlights at the School of Music

Double Reed Fest
Saturday, January 19, beginning 1:30 PM in Mills Hall. Hosted by UW-Madison faculty Andreas Oeste, oboe and Marc Vallon, bassoon, the Double Reed Fest brings together oboists and bassoonists of all ages and abilities in a festive celebration of their instruments.

The Panama Papers: Tom Curry, tuba; Mark Hetzler, trombone; and Anthony DiSanza, percussion
Saturday, January 26, 8:00 PM, Mills Hall. Free.

Schubertiade with Martha Fischer, Bill Lutes and Schubert scholar Susan Youens (See above.)
Sunday, January 27, 2:00 PM (lecture), 3:00 PM (concert). $7 – $17.

Spring 2019 Carillon Concerts with Lyle Anderson. Observatory Drive.
All concerts are Sundays at 3:00 PM.
January 13 & 27; February 10 & 24; March 10 & 24; April 14 & 28; May 12 & 26.

Decoda Interactive Performance Residency
Final concert: Thursday, January 31, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.
Decoda is a collective of versatile artists dedicated to creating dynamic performances and creative programs designed for social impact. Decoda’s pursuits place equal emphasis on artistry and engagement to create meaningful musical experiences around the globe through concerts in major international venues and neighborhood projects with vibrant community partners.

7th Wisconsin Summit for Band Conductors
Friday, February 1 @ 7:00 AM – 12:00 PM.
A workshop featuring internationally renowned clinicians focused on self-improvement for the middle and high school band directors. Hosted by Scott Teeple, professor, conductor of Wind Ensemble.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Announcing the World Premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata

December 17, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

ANNOUNCING A WORLD PREMIERE:
Composer John Harbison pens new composition for Pro Arte Quartet violist Sally Chisholm

New strings scholarship also created

Composer and music educator John Harbison, winner of both a MacArthur Fellowship “genius” grant and a Pulitzer Prize in composition, has created a new work for Sally Chisholm, violist with the University of Wisconsin’s Pro Arte Quartet.

Sally Chisholm
John Harbison

The composition, tentatively entitled “Sonata for Viola and Piano,” will receive its world premiere with Chisholm and Minnesota pianist Timothy Lovelace at a special concert on the UW-Madison campus February 17, 2019, 7:30 PM, as part of a yearlong celebration of the composer’s 80th birthday. Across the world in 2018 and 2019, the celebration includes two other world premieres, over a dozen new recordings, a first book and many performances.

In tandem with the concert, the Mead Witter School of Music announces the Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship, initiated with a $10,000 gift from the Inhorns, to be augmented with ticket proceeds from the concert. The scholarship will be awarded in the fall of 2019, and is available to both graduate and undergraduate strings students.

“As the cost of higher education increases dramatically, we recognize that the availability of more scholarships will greatly enhance the ability of the Mead Witter School of Music to attract both in-state and out-of-state strings students,” said Stanley Inhorn.

Susan C. Cook, director of the School of Music, expressed her thanks to the Inhorns. “Stan and Shirley Inhorn have been great and generous friends to the Madison music community. Their ongoing support of the Mead Witter School of Music will ensure that our wonderful students can realize their musical dreams.”

Harbison has known Chisholm for many years. “I have been aware of Sally’s extraordinary playing for quite some time,” says Harbison, whose actual 80th birthday is December 20, 2018. “She performed my composition called ‘The Nine Rasas,’ about an ancient Indian theory of states of being that were both interesting and refined. Sally was quite remarkable.”

The first half of the School of Music concert will feature the Pro Arte Quartet (with Chisholm, violinists David Perry and Suzanne Beia, and cellist Parry Karp) performing Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 76, No. 4, known as “Sunrise,” and Harbison’s “Four Encores for Stan,” an homage for string quartet and narration to Polish composer Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, former director of the Minnesota Orchestra.

The program’s second half will include solo performances by Lovelace, followed by Chisholm, who will play selections from Harbison’s “The Violist’s Notebook,” dedicated to fellow violists Kim Kashkashian, Marcus Thompson and James Dunham. Harbison’s new composition, written specifically for Chisholm, will close the program.

Harbison will be present for the premiere.

The performance will take place at 7:30 PM in Mills Concert Hall in the George L. Mosse Humanities Building, 455 N. Park St., on the UW-Madison campus. Tickets are priced at $25 and are available online.

Harbison currently teaches musical composition and arrangement in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s jazz division. He has composed for the Metropolitan Opera, Chicago Symphony, Boston Symphony, New York Philharmonic, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, as well as scores of other large and small ensembles. His catalog includes three operas, six symphonies, twelve concerti, a ballet, five string quartets, numerous song cycles and chamber works, and a large body of sacred music that includes cantatas, motets, and the orchestral-choral works Four Psalms, Requiem and Abraham. His music is widely recorded on leading labels.

He also is a part-time Madison resident who, with his wife Rose Mary Harbison, each summer over Labor Day weekend hosts the weeklong Token Creek Music Festival, which features classical chamber pieces and jazz.

In 2014, Harbison was one of five composers commissioned by the Pro Arte Quartet to compose a piece commemorating the quartet’s 100th anniversary. His String Quartet No. 5 joined compositions by William Bolcom, Walter Mays, Paul Schoenfield and Benoit Mernier, both in performance and on a Pro Arte Quartet Albany Records recording.

Besides serving as violist for the Pro Arte Quartet, Chisholm was a founder of the Thouvenel String Quartet and the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota. She was a finalist at the Naumburg Chamber Music Competition and first prize winner in the Weiner International Chamber Music Competition.

Timothy Lovelace chairs the collaborative piano program at the University of Minnesota and performs all over the world. He and Chisholm have previously premiered works by Andrew Imbrie for the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota, and have performed frequently with many of this Society’s guest artists such as Nobuko Imai, Pete Wiley, and Robert Mann. “His musicianship gives freedom, imagination, and a purity that is beloved. When I see Tim’s name in concert programs at the Kennedy Center and throughout New York City, I think, ‘They are so lucky!’ “ says Chisholm.

Chisholm believes the new sonata will become an “instant classic.”
“After glimpsing just the first two movements, I recognize how wonderfully he writes for viola,” says Chisholm. “The opening measures are the heart of the viola sound, with brilliant expression and interplay with the pianist.”

The new composition departs from the standard sonata structure of three to four movements to include five and perhaps six shorter movements in its initial draft, Chishom says. The same style follows in many of Harbison’s other compositions, although not necessarily that of his prior viola sonata.

“Compared to Mr. Harbison’s Solo Sonata for Viola, written in 1961, the new Sonata for Viola and Piano is centered in the heart of the viola sonority and soulfulness,” Chisholm explains. “The composer comes through so clearly in both, but the geography in the first few movements of his latest work is more compact. We have not yet seen all movements, and are expecting surprises.”

Harbison is still putting the finishing touches on Chisholm’s sonata which he sees as more of collaborative piece and less of a virtuosic work, if only due to the nature of the instrument and its performers.
“Violists form a close community with a special temperament, which influences what I write for viola,” Harbison says. “Violists understand what they play, and that they share the musical texture with other performers.

“I am hoping for a certain type of musical character,” he adds. “Schuman wrote music for cello and violas called ‘fantasy pieces’ that have more informal characters,” he adds. “I believe my approach is more like that.”

In 2016, Chisholm was appointed to a Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation professorship which she named to honor Germain Prévost, violist with the Pro Arte Quartet from its inception in 1912 through 1947. The appointment included $75,000 in research support from WARF over five years. That, plus an unspecified amount from an anonymous admirer of John Harbison, will fund the commission and additional expenses.

Provisions of the commission required that the work be premiered during the composer’s 80th birth anniversary year and that those performances include premieres on either coast. According to Chisholm, former Juilliard String Quartet violist Samuel Rhodes and pianist Robert McDonald will perform the work’s New York premiere March 19 at The Juilliard School. Subsequent performances will include those by Kronos Quartet violist Hank Dutt in San Francisco, Rice University violist James Dunham at the Aspen Music Festival in Aspen, Colorado, as well as violists Richard O’Neill, Marcus Thompson, and Kim Kashkashian.
The anonymous benefactor also has requested premiere performances in London and Berlin, both of which have yet to be arranged.

Says Chisholm: “We are all so grateful to the WARF Professorship that enabled this commission to be seriously pursued. Funding enables the premiere to be performed at UW-Madison, for the consortium to be formed with world famous violists, the underwriting of our guest pianist Timothy Lovelace, the composer John Harbison in attendance, and a great new work to be added to the viola repertoire.”

Other Harbison-related events scheduled in February include a Madison Symphony Orchestra performance of his work “The Most Often Used Chords” ; a UW-Madison Memorial Library exhibit on his music; and a performance of the Grammy Award-nominated Imani Winds Wind Quintet in Shannon Hall at the Wisconsin Union Theatre. Other area ensemble tributes and musical activities are still in the planning stages.

Tickets ($25.00) may be purchased from Campus Arts Ticketing. All seats are general admission.
• Telephone: 608-265-2787
• In person: Memorial Union Box Office, 800 Langdon Street.
• Online: https://artsticketing.wisc.edu

About the Inhorns:
Stanley and Shirley came to Madison in 1953 – Shirley from Iowa to attend graduate school in biochemistry, and Stan from Columbia Medical School to become an intern at the Wisconsin General Hospital. Shirley is a pianist, and she also played the marimba in the University of Iowa band. Stan is a violinist who played in a string quartet in college and also started one in medical school. Stan courted Shirley by taking her to the Pro Arte Quartet concerts on campus, and soon they married and settled down to raise a family of three children. After he completed his training, Stan stayed on at the UW School of Medicine. One day, a neighbor, who happened to be the orchestra conductor at West High School, mentioned that he was going to audition for the Madison Symphony Orchestra. Stan joined him and subsequently played in the orchestra for several years until his academic responsibilities became too demanding. Their three children all took piano lessons, and in elementary school, each chose to play a string instrument – a violin, a cello, and a viola. Thus, the Inhorn String Quartet was created. Soon the children all joined the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras, in which both Shirley and Stan became life trustees. They also became board members of the Madison Symphony Orchestra and the MSOL for which they received the first John DeMain Award. They have also been supporters of the Pro Arte Quartet and other programs at the Mead Witter School of Music. More recently Stan has been a board member of the Oakwood Chamber Players. The Inhorns appreciate the vibrant music scene in Madison and are pleased to be able to contribute their time and resources to these organizations.

 

 

Name a Seat Campaign in Full Swing; Leckrone to step down after 50th year; New Faculty; Bernstein Tribute Concert

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

WELCOME TO A NEW ACADEMIC YEAR!


New opportunity, ending December, 2018: Name a seat in the new Mead Witter Foundation Concert Hall!

From individual chairs and sections of chairs to educational venues and prominent gathering spaces, opportunities remain to support the University of Wisconsin-Madison Mead Witter School of Music’s Hamel Music Center, pictured above. Join us as we usher in a new era of music at UW-Madison.
Click here to learn more!


Please note: Our annual print brochure was mailed mid-August. If you are not already on our mailing list and you’d like to receive a copy, click here to send your snail mail address.


Special announcement: UW Band Director Mike Leckrone announces upcoming season will be his last

Mike Leckrone.

Michael Leckrone, 82, longtime marching band director has announced that he will step down at the end of the 2018-19 academic year, which will be his 50th season. Leckrone made his decision several weeks ago but delayed sharing it publicly until he could meet with students. “I wanted the band to know first,” he says. “Any other talk, any other planning — that came second.” The university will conduct a national search for a new director.
Read the full story here.


NEW FACULTY AT THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Nadia Chana

In January, after serving as the inaugural winner of the Robert Walser and Susan McClary Fellowship, Nadia Chana will join the school of music as assistant professor of ethnomusicology.  The award is given to Ph.D. candidates, seeking to diversify the field of scholars working in American music. She writes: “I grew up in Edmonton/Amiskwaciwâskahikan singing in choirs (and everywhere else), a context that directly shapes my work, however invisibly. My current research focuses on climate crisis and relations among Indigenous activists, non-Indigenous settlers, and nonhuman actors in Northern Alberta and the California Bay Area. Fuelled by the urgency of climate crisis, I ask: what can healthy relationships between humans and the more-than-human world – plants, animals, water, land – look and feel like? And what role do practices like listening, walking, and even singing play in transforming these relationships?” Read about Nadia.

Margaret Butler joins the school of music as visiting associate professor of musicology. Most recently, she was associate professor of musicology at the University of Florida. Her research on eighteenth-century opera explores a range of top including theatrical production practices and administrative models, stylistic fusion and reform,exoticism, and iconography.
Read about Margaret.

More new faculty

Andreas Oeste, assistant adjunct professor of oboe
Julia Rottmayer, adjunct professor of voice
Trevor Baca, visiting assistant professor of musicology
Read about all our current and new faculty here.

Meet Brian Heller, new facilities director
L-R: Brian Heller, new School of Music facilities director; Ben Sonnentag, JPCullen project engineer; and Tim Bizjak, JPCullen project manager.

In February, Brian Heller joined the Mead-Witter School of Music as facilities director.  Most recently, he was director of the Clemens Fine Arts Center at a college in Paducah, Kentucky, and has held a number of positions in non-profit theaters and arts centers in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Washington D.C. and Minnesota. He is a 1998 graduate of the Bolz Center at the Wisconsin School of Business.

 

 


(Right: A horn quartet performed at the Mead Witter Graduation, Hooding & Awards Celebration in Mills Hall, May 11, 2018. L-R; Rachel Feit, Spencer Koscik, Patrick Hines, Dayfdd Bevil.)


STUDENT/ALUMNI NEWS

“Music despite pain”: Doctoral pianist perseveres through tough odds
Kangwoo Jin, a student of Professors Jessica Johnson and  Christopher Taylor, was diagnosed with hemophilia when a child in South Korea, and must inject himself with blood-clotting protein several times a week. He’s managed to win ten piano competitions nonetheless. Read full story in the Wisconsin State Journal.

Alumnus winner
Matthew Lee, a 2017 graduate from the studio of violinist Associate Professor Soh-Hyun Park Altino, was a winner of the 2018 Jan and Beattie Wood Concerto Competition at Brevard Music Center. Matthew was the only violinist winner in this year’s competition, which included a performance of the Brahms Violin Concerto, first movement, with the Brevard Music Center Orchestra on July 29. Matthew is currently pursuing a masters degree of music in violin performance at University of Texas at Austin.

Women Took Center Stage
LunART, an arts festival centered on women, was held in Madison in late June to great success. The founder was Iva Ugrćič (above), a DMA graduate in flute. Both the Wisconsin State Journal and Isthmus weekly ran preview stories about the event, which drew hundreds of patrons and featured composers, musicians, dancers, actors, and more.


FACULTY NEWS

The Chicago Composers’ Consortium offers a fresh selection of compositions at a concert on September 23, 3 PM, at North Shore Baptist Church, 5244 N. Lakewood Avenue, Chicago.
(Suggested donation: $15 accepted at the door.) One of these, The Violinists in my Life, was written by faculty composer Laura Schwendinger and will be performed by alumna Eleanor Bartsch.


FEATURED SEPTEMBER CONCERTS

Please note: to buy tickets at the door, day of show, please arrive early to prevent long lines!

Music of Leonard Bernstein – A 100th Birthday Tribute

Saturday, September 15 @ 8:00 pm – $7 – $17
Celebrating the music of Leonard Bernstein in this 100th anniversary year of his birth. With Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes, piano and voice; Paul Rowe, baritone; and Cheryl Bensman-Rowe, soprano. Featuring the Arias and Barcarolles for two singers and pianists as well as songs from the Broadway and art song repertoires.
Learn More/Buy Tickets

39th Karp Family Opening Concert
Tuesday, September 4 @ 7:30 pm – Free
Featuring Parry Karp, violoncello; Christopher Karp, piano; Frances Karp, piano; Alicia Lee, clarinet; Suzanne Beia, violin; Katrin Talbot, viola.

Faculty Jazz Sextet
Thursday, September 6 @ 7:30 pm – Free
Featuring Alex Noppe, trumpet; Les Thimmig, saxophones; Louka Patenaude, guitar; Johannes Wallmann, piano; Nick Moran, bass; Matt Endres, drums.

Faculty Recital: Soh-Hyun Altino, violin
Sunday, September 9 @ 3:00 pm – Free
This concert will feature works for violin and piano by women composers, including Beach, Chaminade, Clarke, and L. Boulanger. With pianist Jeannie Yu.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.



You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Concerto Winners on stage March 18; Meet Satoko Hayami from “Sound Out Loud”; Jazz Orchestra 50th anniversary podcast

March 2, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/


“Symphony Showcase” Coming Soon!

Sunday,  March 18, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

We’ve announced this before, but here’s a reminder: Our annual concerto winners solo recital (a/k/a Symphony Showcase”) takes place at 7:30 PM on March 18 in Mills Hall.

Our 2018 winners are Kaleigh Acord, violin (Beethoven, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, first movement); Aaron Gochberg, percussion (Keiko Abe, Prism Rhapsody); Eleni Katz, bassoon (Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in B flat major); Eric Tran, piano (Bach, Concerto No. 4 in A Major); and Mengmeng Wang, composer (premiere: “Blooming”).

Tickets are only $10 for adults, free to students, and there’s a free reception after the show in Mills Hall. Buy tickets here or at the door.


Meet Satoko Hayami, graduate pianist

Satoko, a doctoral student in Professor Martha Fischer‘s studio,  is a member of Sound Out Loud, a recent winner of The American Prize.  Here’s an excerpt from our recent Q&A with Satoko:
“The idea of starting a contemporary chamber music ensemble came to me in searching for ways to better connect with more diverse audiences. I felt that the diverse musical language in contemporary repertoire might have as much or even more potential to be relevant to the different kinds of audiences including young people and non-classical music fans than older repertoire, if presented in appropriate ways. I wanted to team up with people who are open to different, sometimes unconventional ways to present music, and was lucky to find people who share the similar interests, openness and enthusiasm right away.”

Read more here.
Satoko Hayami


James Latimer wins award

Emeritus Professor of Percussion James Latimer won a Lifetime Achievement Award at annual Wisconsin Days of Percussion event, January 27, 2018 in Milwaukee. While at UW-Madison, Latimer spearheaded a Duke Ellington Festival, started the Madison Marimba Quartet, initiated the first of 300 Young Audience Concerts held in public schools from 1969 to 1984, and hosted the Wisconsin Percussive Arts Society “Days of Percussion.”


Shain Woodwind/Piano Duo winners concert

3:30 pm, Sunday, March 4,  Morphy Hall

A competition and recital sponsored by former UW-Madison Chancellor Irving Shain
Winners were announced on Tuesday, February 27. They include: Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo, bassoon and Satoko Hayami, piano;
Anna Fisher-Roberts, flute and Eric Tran, piano.

Read more here.

Local arts reviewers loved “La Boheme”

University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Foreground, left to right: Claire Powling (Musetta), Michael Kelley (Waiter), Jake Elfner (Alcindoro) Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
“University Opera’s “La Bohème” proves a complete success on all counts – from the staging and the costumes to the singing and the orchestra”
Larry Wells, The Well-Tempered Ear, Feb. 27.

“Ronis’ able hand was evident in the players’ acting. The cast was consistently believable, and consequently I was drawn into their world and suffered along with their despair over love’s inconsistencies and death’s sting. Using my acid test for a performance’s success, I never glanced at my watch either night. I was fully engaged.

“The orchestra was a marvel. Conductor Chad Hutchinson let it soar when it was appropriate, but the orchestra never overshadowed the singers. In fact, the key term that kept occurring to me both evenings was balance. The acting, the back-and-forth between the singers, and the interplay between the orchestra and the singers were consistently evenhanded.

“As for the singers, the primary roles were double cast. Friday’s Mimi was Shaddai Solidum whose first aria “Mi chiamano Mimi” was a lesson in the mastery of legato. Saturday’s Mimi was Yanzelmalee Rivera who possesses a bell-like voice of remarkable agility.”

Read the entire review here.
Yanzelmalee Rivera as Mimi in University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
University Opera Offers a Gem in a Bejewelled Setting
Greg Hettsmanberger, What Greg Says, 2.27.18

“Again we have been given much to look forward to; certainly it is unrealistic to see University Opera in Shannon Hall every season, but we can hope that it becomes a semi-regular occurrence. The greater lesson from Sunday’s performance however is this: wherever Ronis and his “kids” show up, the audience is in store for some memorable opera. The national awards and recognition that the program are consistently earning are richly deserved, and our town is clearly the richer for what these folks are giving us.”

Read the full review here.

Johannes Wallmann and Jazz at UW-Madison

“Bucky’s Jazz Savior,”  Madison Magazine, February 2018

“It was that combination of vision, leadership and expertise as a pianist and composer that quickly pushed him to the top of UW–Madison’s list of candidates for director of jazz studies. During [Director of Jazz Studies Johannes] Wallmann’s first year of teaching here, in 2012-2013, he sought out and performed with many local jazz musicians as a means of building relationships and moving the music program forward.

“In less than five years, Wallmann took the Jazz Studies undergraduate program from zero enrollees to 17. It’s an important part of the efforts to revitalize Madison’s jazz community.”

Read the story here.

Announcement: The UW Jazz Orchestra is turning 50! April’s annual Jazz Fest will celebrate this anniversary with three concerts featuring guest trumpeter Marquis Hill, winner of the 2014 Thelonious Monk Competition. Learn about the history of the Jazz Orchestra with our new six-episode podcasts with Les Thimmig, longtime composer and saxophonist. Listen to Episode 1 on our SoundCloud channel.


The American Prize first-place vocal winner coming to Madison on March 19 & 20

Vocalist Kristina Bachrach, recent winner of The American Prize in Vocal Performance and the Friedrich and Virginia Schorr Memorial Award, will perform a concert on March 20 at 7:00 PM in Music Hall. Accompanied by faculty pianist Daniel Fung, she’ll sing selections from “The Recovered Voices Initiative,” started by James Conlon and Los Angeles Opera, which focuses on musical works and musicians that were either suppressed or killed by the Nazi regime in World War II.

Kristina Bachrach
Read about Kristina, the Initiative, and The American Prize at this link.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Meet New Faculty, Part 2; New Laura Schwendinger CD; “Schubertiade” Jan. 28; Calling All Oboists, Bassoonists, and Clarinetists

December 14, 2017

Holiday Greetings from the Mead Witter School of Music!

455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

We wish everyone a harmonious holiday season and a happy New Year.

For our last newsletter of 2017, we offer three more faculty profiles, a sneak peek at events in late January, and news about a brand-new CD release featuring the music of Laura Schwendinger.

We’re also pleased to announce four of our five winners of our annual Concerto Competition. Our fifth winner will be a composer, selected later this month. 2017-2018 instrumental winners are Eleni Katz, bassoon (first bassoonist in 20 years!); Eric Tran, piano; Aaron Gochberg, percussion; and Kaleigh Acord, violin. Read about these winners here, and save March 18 on your calendar for our Symphony Showcase concert and free lobby reception!

Our second semester begins on January 20.

Our Annual “Schubertiade”: Sunday, January 28, 3:00 PM

This year’s Schubertiade will present at least one work from each year of Schubert’s all-too-brief but brilliant career. Beginning with one of his earliest piano duets, written when he was 14 years old, and ending with songs from his final year, this 5th Annual Schubertiade at the Mead-Witter School of Music will take place on Sunday afternoon, January 28, 2018 at 3pm in Mills Concert Hall.

Once again, pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes will be joined by School of Music faculty, students, and guest mezzo-soprano Rachel Wood, professor of voice at UW-Whitewater.

Please join us for a reception in the University Club following the performance.

$15 adults/$5 non-SOM students.
http://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/


Are there any young clarinetists, bassoonists or oboists in your midst?

If so, sign up now for Double Reed Fest (for oboists and bassoonists) on Saturday, January 20 and Clarinet Day, Sunday, January 21. Each day features master classes, lessons with our faculty, and a recital by special guests.

Double Reed Fest with Mead Witter faculty Marc Vallon, professor of bassoon; Aaron Hill, adjunct professor of oboe; and guest oboist Nancy Ambrose King, professor of oboe and chair of the Winds & Percussion Department at the University of Michigan. Ms. King won first prize in the Third New York International Competition for Solo Oboists, held in 1995.

Hear Ms. King perform Benjamin Britten’s 6 Metamorphoses After Ovid for Solo Oboe:

Clarinet Day with Mead Witter faculty Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet, and special guest Gabriel Campos Zamora, a native of San José, Costa Rica, the newly appointed principal clarinet of the Minnesota Orchestra. Campos was most recently the associate principal clarinet of the Kansas City Symphony and has appeared as guest principal clarinet with the Cleveland Orchestra, Seattle and Houston Symphonies in addition to serving as the Virginia Symphony’s principal clarinet.


New CD from faculty composer Laura Schwendinger

Prof. Laura Schwendinger’s second recording for Albany Records features four works for quartets: two for the traditional string quartet; one for mezzo soprano and three strings; and one for piano quartet. The music is performed by the acclaimed JACK Quartet, mezzo-soprano Jamie Van Eyck, and pianist Christopher Taylor. The CD is already available for pre-ordering from Amazon.


Choral Union wins applause from local reviewer

Emeritus history professor John Barker had this to say about our fall Choral Union performance of Mozart’s Great C Minor Mass and Brahms’ Schicksalslied.  “An excellent performance that should alert listeners to neglected treasures,” he wrote in The Well-Tempered Ear. Read the review here.


Meet New Faculty

We’ve posted interviews with several new faculty members on our WordPress blog. Read about their views on teaching, what excites them and even their most enjoyable and embarrassing moments in their musical histories. Interviews conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertation in piano performance. Here are a few quotations from our interviews (click the links to read the entire interview).

Chad Hutchinson, conductor
Chad Hutchinson

“This season we performed works of Mason Bates and Christopher Theofanidis on our first two concerts, and will feature Caroline Shaw and Stephen Shewan on concerts in the spring. Many of these works have never been performed in Madison or the state of Wisconsin, so it is very exciting to bring something fresh and invigorating to the area. The “Composer’s Datebook” segment on National Public Radio always says that “All music was once new,” which is true. I feel that if we only perform works that have been vetted in classical music we will miss out on exciting new opportunities.”

Alicia Lee, clarinet
Alicia Lee

“Six years ago, I along with some close musical friends founded a chamber collective called Decoda. Our mission from the start was to bring meaningful musical experiences to all audiences. As a freelancer (in my former life), it can be difficult to feel real ownership over the work that we find ourselves doing, and Decoda became a very important part of my life since we built it from the ground up. I would love to bring colleagues from Decoda to Madison and also to UW-Madison, because I think we have a unique process and way of presenting our music.”

Alex Noppe, trumpet
Alex Noppe. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

(Upon the founding of the Mirari Brass Quintet). “Originally, it was a group of graduate students at Indiana that formed the group, but over the years we changed a few members (adding Stephanie Frye, UW-Madison MM 2010 & DMA 2013). We’ve always had a bit of an interesting model in that we live in four different states scattered across the country, which definitely presents some challenges for rehearsing and performing.

“Mirari is in its ninth season together and we spend most of our time doing concert tours, educational residencies, and new music commissioning. We play a fairly eclectic mix of music that we’ve affectionately dubbed “stylistic whiplash”–everything from Renaissance to jazz to contemporary classical to Latin to musical theater, and on and on. At this point we’ve performed in about 30 states and did our first international concert tour this past summer in China. We have one album out from a few years ago and another one being released in just over a month on Summit Records.”


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Meet New Faculty: Chad Hutchinson, conductor

Chad Hutchinson, a native of Iowa, came to Wisconsin as adjunct professor to conduct both the UW-Madison Symphony and University Opera Orchestras. Prior to his appointment here, he was assistant conductor of the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra and director of the South Dakota Symphony Youth Orchestras, and has also conducted in Minnesota, Iowa, and Williamsville, New York. Prof. Hutchinson holds conducting degrees from the University of Minnesota and Bowling Green State University and a bachelor’s degree in music education from Morningside College. Read Chad’s full biography here. His commitment to outreach and the performance of new music is strong, and he has been recognized for his opera conducting skills with a third-place award in the American Prize in Opera Conducting.

Conductor Chad Hutchinson in rehearsal with the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.


When you go to the Coasts, what questions do people ask you about the Midwest, and how do you answer?

When traveling outside the Midwest, when I say that I live in South Dakota people automatically assume that I live in a small town and don’t have access to resources. Sioux Falls has 175,000 people and I feel that it is my job to educate others that the Midwest has both rural and urban areas.

Having lived in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio and South Dakota, truthfully they are all quite similar.  The generosity and genuine care for others is something that sets people apart in this part of the country.  The biggest difference living in South Dakota is that the state itself has a small population, so no matter where you are in the state the degree of separation is much less.  Also, my wife always has told me that the beauty of the prairie will grow on me.  There is a sense of calm that one experiences when being able to see the sunset to the west for many miles.

Concert audiences here can expect to hear the programming of both old and new music. How do you choose the newer works? 

Exposing students and audience members alike to new music is a core value of my educational philosophy.  I try to select repertoire by composers who are getting a lot of recognition and being performed regularly across the country in professional orchestras, or are composers that I feel are under-represented.  This season we  performed works of Mason Bates and Christopher Theofanidis on our first two concerts, and will feature Caroline Shaw and Stephen Shewan on concerts in the spring.  Many of these works have never been performed in Madison or the state of Wisconsin, so it is very exciting to bring something fresh and invigorating to the area.  The “Composer’s Datebook” segment on National Public Radio always says that “All music was once new,” which is true.  I feel that if we only perform works that have been vetted in classical music we will miss out on exciting new opportunities.  As an assistant with the South Dakota Symphony, I learned from Maestro Delta David Gier as he programmed living composers on nearly every subscription concert during his tenure with the orchestra.  There has been a transformation in the audience’s and orchestra’s reaction to new music there and I hope to make the same type of footprint here.  The School of Music at UW-Madison has so many applied faculty with experience in these endeavors that it has been a joy to have so much support from others with our selections of new music.

The “Composer’s Datebook” segment on National Public Radio always says that “All music was once new,” which is true.  I feel that if we only perform works that have been vetted in classical music we will miss out on exciting new opportunities.

After a helping of Babcock ice cream last summer, Chad Hutchinson’s daughters Lauren, 4 and Julia, 7, take a spin on the famous Terrace chair.

Share one memorable and one embarrassing musical experience.

When I was 20, I traveled to Spain, France and England as part of a college choir tour.  On successive nights in London, I saw the Philadelphia Orchestra on tour perform Wagner’s  Die Meistersinger and Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite.  For a young kid from Iowa, this was life-changing and made me realize the power of opera as well as the possibilities of color and dynamics within a professional orchestra.  I am always taken aback not by the loud playing of the great professional orchestras, but the control of soft dynamics.

My embarrassing moment came in Europe a few years later when doing a conducting workshop in the Czech Republic. As a college baseball player, I always would represent the number 2 as the index finger and pinky finger.  I got on the podium and said in my broken Czech, “Second movement please,” while holding up two fingers.  Pretty soon the entire orchestra is laughing and doing the same back to me.  I came to realize that in the Czech culture this is the equivalent of our middle finger gesture.  The orchestra liked “giving the finger(s)” to the young conductor.

What is different about conducting today vs. 30 years ago?

I think that the dictatorial days of the conductors of the past seems to have shifted quite a bit in recent years to a more level playing field with musicians.  Social media has changed the professional landscape with marketing campaigns for the top conductors of the major orchestras.  However, at the end of the day, the joy of collaborating with great musicians on amazing works of art is still the same today as it was 30 years ago.

Chad and Karen Hutchinson at the Wisconsin-Iowa football game.

You’ve been involved in quite a few unique events. Are there any that you would like to replicate here?

I spent the past year and a half working on a ballet project in South Dakota with four local companies and our youth orchestra.  I accepted this position [in Madison] before getting to the performance of the project, but I am happy to say that my successor is going through with the concert.  In this project, each company received a different composer – Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Copland and Gershwin – and the goal was to trace some of the evolution of the dance medium as well as giving the orchestra and dancers an opportunity to perform live with each other.  I hope to collaborate with the dance department on a project in the future as I feel that the more we work together in all the arts, the better.

Where were you guest conducting recently?

I have been in many high schools recently in South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin recruiting first and foremost.  I also recently conducted the Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphony  and just returned from doing a High School Area All-State Festival in New York.

Your wife and family visited Madison this fall for the Badgers-Iowa football game. Did your family enjoy it (even though Iowa lost)?
I will admit that being a die-hard lifelong Iowa fan has been a bit difficult in recent years, both by getting my graduate degree from the University of Minnesota and now working here at UW-Madison. However, I root for the Badgers when they are not playing the Hawkeyes.  I had high hopes for the Iowa-Wisconsin game as it started so well for the Hawks, but the tides quickly turned and the Badgers had a great day. This being said, even though the Hawkeyes lost, the atmosphere at Camp Randall stadium was amazing and a lot of fun to be a part of.  Karen and I also took our kids to the Badger men’s and women’s basketball games, where they were super excited to meet Bucky Badger.


Professor Hutchinson will next conduct these performances:
University Opera presents La Bohème, February 23, 24 and 25 at the Memorial Union’s Shannon Hall, David Ronis directing.

Symphony Showcase, a concert featuring our concerto competition winners, March 18, Mills Hall.

Faculty Interviews, Part 1; Choral Union presents Mozart’s C Minor Mass; Take a class on Japanese music; Alumni News

December 1, 2017

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706

http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Post-Thanksgiving greetings, and welcome to Part 1 of a two-part end-of-semester newsletter!

Choral Union presents Mozart’s Great C Minor Mass and Brahms’ Schicksalslied (“Song of Destiny”)

With Beverly Taylor, conductor, the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, and soloists Sarah Richardson, soprano; Chelsie Propst, soprano; Wesley Dunnagan, tenor; and Matthew Chastain, baritone. Event webpage.

Saturday, December 9, 8 PM and Sunday, December 10, 7 PM. $15 adults, $8 students.

The Great Mass in C-Minor “represents a super-human leap in the capacity of Mozart’s style. Someone once defined two kinds of genius: the person who is like us, only ten times better; the person whom nobody could predict. In the mass, Mozart becomes the second – in effect, a magician.” — Steve Schwartz, Classical.net

The Schicksalslied (“Song of Destiny”) is based on poetry of Friedrich Hölderlin, an 18th-century German poet, and “portrays the brush between spiritually blinded, self-doomed mortals and the Elysian spirits.” — Carol Tailback, San Francisco Choral Society

Click here to see buying and parking options.


Curious about our new faculty?

We’ve posted interviews with several new faculty members on our WordPress blog. Read about their views on teaching, what excites them and even their most enjoyable and embarrassing moments in their musical histories. Interviews conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertation in piano performance. Here are a few quotations from our interviews (click the links to read the entire interview).

Double bassist David Scholl:
You’ve described Madison as “crunchy.” Define “crunchy.”
” ‘Crunchy’ is a term that comes from the type of health-conscious people who eat lots of granola, and the connotations that are associated with granola consumers, such as being environmentally conscious and having a more do-it-yourself lifestyle. Madison has a lot of great health food with all of its great restaurants, co-ops, and farmers markets; and with the thriving bike and artistic culture here the word seemed to fit. I meant it as a term of endearment, as I myself strive to be crunchier everyday.”

David Scholl

Flutist Timothy Hagen:
“One final point I try to impart to my students that I learned from Jim Walker: being the best musician you can be is not a guarantee of success. There is nothing wrong with capitalizing on every skill you have. This mindset has not only led me to career success in areas outside playing and teaching the flute, such as community outreach, composing, and curriculum design, but it also has enriched my artistic life and my personal life.”

Timothy Hagen

Jazz drummer & jazz history instructor Matthew Endres:
What’s the most rewarding thing about teaching the students here at UW?   “These kids work and have a real passion for music. I’ve noticed substantial maturity in their playing in a very short period of time. They have a hunger for progress and the standards put onto them by faculty elevate their musicality immensely. I’m very honored to be working with world class educators here within the Mead Witter School of Music.”

Matthew Endres

In two weeks: Clarinetist Alicia Lee, orchestra conductor Chad Hutchinson, and trumpeter Alex Noppe.


Take a class on Japanese music (or other topics)

Musicology instructor Matthew Richardson (Ph. D, Northwestern University, 2016) has developed a brand-new class called “Music in Japan.” It’s an overview of the stylistic and historical depth of music in Japan, including traditional genres like classical court culture, kabuki, and geisha performance, as well as modern J-pop, film music, and anime music. “What Japanese hear in Japanese music is different from what Americans often hear in Japanese music,” he says. “And when Japanese fans listen to American music, it often means something different to them, too. One good example might be punk rock. In the US, that sort of sound is associated with rebellion and counterculture. But in Japan, a lot of artists use it as simply an energetic, youthful style without intending any of the political and meanings it has in the US.”
Read our complete blog post here.

Artist: Katsushika Hokusai, Edo period, Late, 1789-1868. Courtesy Harvard Art Museum.

Additional classes offered next semester (please check with the instructor; not all classes are open to non-majors):

  • MUSIC 416: Survey of Music in the Twentieth Century with Professor Susan C. Cook
  • MUSIC 542: Choral Literature and Performance Practices of Today with Associate Director of Choral Conducting Bruce Gladstone
  • MUSIC 546: String Literature with Artist-in-Residence and Pro Arte Quartet Violinist Suzanne Beia
  • MUSIC 319: Topics in Music and Ethnicity in the United States (Delta Blues) with Professor Charles Dill
  • MUSIC 318: Cultural Cross Currents: West African Dance/Music in the Americas with Associate Professor of Dance Christopher Walker

and a variety of Special Topics courses (all MUSIC 497):

  • Opera Production with Assistant Professor David Ronis
  • Electro-Acoustic Ensemble with Associate Professor Daniel Grabois
  • Advanced Aural Skills: From the Conservatoire with Professor Marc Vallon
  • Marching Band Techniques with Assistant Director of Bands Darin Olson
  • Acting for Singers with Assistant Professor David Ronis
  • Jazz Innovators: Armstrong, Ellington and Beyond with Adjunct Professor Matthew Endres
  • Music, Critical Pedagogy = Social Change with Associate Professor Teryl Dobbs
Learn more about “Music in Japan” and other music courses available this spring by checking the “Public Search” option at this website.

Alumni News

Nathaniel Wolkstein
Allyson Fleck
Nick Connors
CHROMOS Tuba Quartet

The Chromos Tuba Quartet.

Click here to read.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Meet New Faculty: Alicia Lee, clarinet

Clarinetist Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet, came here this fall from New York City, where she performed regularly with many ensembles, including the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Knights, Alarm Will Sound, NOVUS, and ACME, and participated in music festivals all over the world. She co-founded Decoda, a chamber music collective affiliated with Carnegie Hall, and is also a member of NOW Ensemble, a contemporary music group comprised of composers and performers. For seven years, Alicia was associate principal of the Santa Barbara Symphony and also played bass clarinet with the Bergen Philharmonic in Norway in 2013-14. Her degrees are in French language and literature (Columbia University) She studied at The Juilliard School and earned additional degrees from the University of Southern California and The Colburn School as a student of Yehuda Gilad.

At the Mead Witter School of Music, she is now a member of the Wingra Wind Quintet.

Read Prof. Lee’s full biography here.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.

Alicia Lee. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

In New York City you’ve had a very active performing career. Are you still shuttling back and forth between NYC and Madison? Did you ever foresee yourself entering academia?

Yes, I am still shuttling back and forth between NYC and Madison – this Thanksgiving, I was thankful for nonstop United flights between Madison and Newark. I am lucky to still have performing opportunities on the East Coast, but the main reason I am going back so often is because my husband is still living in New York! I was not necessarily focused on finding a college teaching job, but it was always among the mix of my interests. I grew up in Michigan with my parents teaching in the music department at Michigan State University, so there is definitely a level of familiarity with this environment that I am very much enjoying.

You hold a bachelor’s degree in French language and literature. What connections have you made between French language/lit and music?

My initial reason behind choosing French language/literature as a focus of study was because I knew that I was headed towards a career in music. I wanted to spend my time at university studying something that I always found beautiful and fascinating but perhaps not the most practical! I discovered that the process of learning a language is similar to my experience of learning music. In order to feel really comfortable expressing myself, I have to feel so comfortable in the language that it becomes second nature. There are so many subtleties within language and the more you catch onto them, the more you see them in every language, including music. Unfortunately, my French never became quite as fluent to me as music, but I guess that’s why I became a musician.

What is your most memorable musical or professional experience? Your most embarrassing?

One of my most memorable musical experiences is hearing a classic, live recording of Schubert’s Shepherd on the Rock, sung by Benita Valente. There is a moment where her voice almost, almost breaks, but doesn’t. To me it’s one of the most sublime musical moments that has taught me so much about how I want to be able to play the clarinet. My most embarrassing musical experience was when I was in high school at a summer music festival. I showed up to an orchestra rehearsal – one of my very first orchestral experiences ever – without my music, which I had left on my bed in my dorm room after dutifully practicing my part. Everyone around me was urging me to just run back and get it, but I was so nervous and worried that I just faked my way through Prokofiev’s Love of Three Oranges Suite. Somehow the intense anxiety and adrenaline of the moment got me through. I’ve never played that piece since and if you asked me to hum a tune from it, it would be impossible.

Above: Alicia Lee joins the Decoda Ensemble for a performance of Thomas Adès “Catch.” With Lee are Anna Elashvili, violin; Claire Bryant, cello; and Michael Mizrahi, piano.

Are there any New York City projects that you could bring to Madison audiences?

Six years ago, I along with some close musical friends founded a chamber collective called Decoda. Our mission from the start was to bring meaningful musical experiences to all audiences. As a freelancer (in my former life), it can be difficult to feel real ownership over the work that we find ourselves doing, and Decoda became a very important part of my life since we built it from the ground up. I would love to bring colleagues from Decoda to Madison and also to UW-Madison, because I think we have a unique process and way of presenting our music.

About  UW-Madison’s Wingra Wind Quintet:

The Wingra Quintet is an opportunity for me to collaborate closely with my colleagues in the wind department. We look forward to expanding our performing season and programming many exciting works. One piece in particular that I am looking forward to is “Ten Pieces for Wind Quintet” by Gyorgy Ligeti. While it is considered a staple of the quintet repertoire, it is quite a time commitment, which often prevent it from being programmed. I am lucky to be in a situation where we have the time and space to put together such a masterwork from the repertoire, as well as have colleagues equally excited to work on this beast!

To contact Prof. Lee for information or a sample lesson, email her at anlee7@wisc.edu.

See Prof. Lee with the full Wingra Quintet, this Sunday at the Chazen Museum, noon. Click here for program.