Category Archives: Faculty News

Meet New Faculty: Timothy Hagen, flute

New to UW-Madison, Timothy Hagen, adjunct professor of flute, is an internationally acclaimed flutist, praised for his “technical virtuosity and musical sensitivity” (NewMusicBox).

With my friend and colleague, Brandon Rumsey, just before the premiere of Michael Mikulka’s Flute Concerto, written for me.

He has been a prizewinner at multiple major competitions, including the Myrna Brown Artist Competition, Australian International Flute Competition, and Pasadena Showcase House Instrumental Competition. As a soloist, Dr. Hagen has appeared at New York’s 92nd Street Y and Lincoln Center in addition to multiple concerto performances with the Missouri Symphony. He was principal flute of the Missouri Symphony from 2009-2016 and has performed with orchestras across the country, including the Minnesota Orchestra, San Antonio Symphony, Eugene Symphony, and Dallas Wind Symphony. His experience as a chamber musician includes fellowships at the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival and Atlantic Music Festival, and his compositions are performed by professional musicians throughout the United States.

Before joining the faculty at UW-Madison, Dr. Hagen taught at Oklahoma State University and the University of Texas at Austin, as well as in partnership with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Lincoln Center Education, and Dallas Symphony. He holds degrees from the University of Texas at Austin, University of Southern California, and University of North Carolina School of the Arts, in addition to a professional studies certificate from the Colburn School.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.


You are now a member of the Wingra Wind Quintet. What are some of your favorite works for wind quintet, and do you plan to program those pieces soon?

Performing with Wingra is one of the highlights of my job. Each of my four colleagues in the group is a superior musician, as well as a nice person, so everything we play together is a treat. That said, of the warhorses, I love Paul Hindemith’s Kleine Kammermusik, Op. 24, No. 2. I also love newer quintets by Jennifer Higdon and Andrea Clearfield, which we consider programming in 2018, along with Gyorgy Ligeti’s Ten Pieces (something of a classic by now), and John Harbison’s quintet. Right now, we’re giving our fabulous horn player (Joanna Schulz) a little break and playing Elliott Carter’s Eight Etudes and a Fantasy for woodwind quartet. The music is not only excellently crafted, but it is also captivating and compelling. I’ve wanted to play it for years, and I’m fortunate that my first time is with Wingra.

You’ve composed many works for flute. What is the difference between writing more pedagogical works vs a concert piece?

When I’m composing, my primary focus is to create a work that is successful in expressing what it’s trying to express. That is true whether the work is pedagogical or for the stage. For teaching pieces, like my NarrEtudes (as in “narrated etudes,” each of which is a chapter of a story), I have to be very conscious of the level of student I am targeting. These pieces aim to teach expressivity at the same time young students are still developing technique, so I had to be careful to find the perfect level of technical difficulty—the Goldilocks spot, not too easy or too hard, but just right—to correspond to the expressive demands of the pieces.

To a degree, this is also true of concert works. If I am writing a piece for myself, the process is somewhat easier because I have a strong sense of my strengths and areas where I need to grow, so I will tend to write music that will capitalize on the former and stretch me in service of the latter. If I am writing a piece for someone else, then there tends to be an ongoing conversation about what they want while I am crafting the piece. Drafts get sent back and forth, and the process stays open. This is what happened on my latest piece, In a Yellow Wood for piccolo and piano, which was written for a consortium of students of the late, great Jack Wellbaum, former Solo Piccolo of the Cincinnati Symphony. The lead commissioner, Heather Verbeck, is a beautiful, sensitive player, and we became good friends through this project.

Sometimes, however, the two worlds come together: someone else commissions me AND I am left to my own devices. I was commissioned to write the required work for the Texas Flute Society’s 2017 Myrna Brown Artist Competition, and the contract had two requirements: the work had to use extended techniques (sounds beyond the traditional scope of flute tone), and it had to be sufficiently difficult to help the judges decide who should advance to the final round and ultimately win. This resulted in my piece Pop for solo flute, which was a ton of fun to write. It was the first piece I have ever composed where I was well aware during the process that it was possible, but it would take a LOT of practice to play (even for me, the composer). Because of this, I focused on making the piece fun and catchy, both for audiences and performers. Judging from the feedback after it was performed, I thankfully managed to get the balance right.

What do you offer to your students that is most unique – perhaps an aspect of teaching that came from one of your teachers?

I was fortunate in that my first teacher in college, Philip Dunigan at the North Carolina School of the Arts, was really from a different generation. He freelanced in New York City in the 1950s and 1960s, when you would go to Juilliard until you started getting enough work to quit school (which is exactly what he did, leaving without even a bachelor’s degree). In my lessons with him, he would hold up great musicians of the past as sonic role models, especially singers, like the phenomenal Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballé, whose recordings I’ve recently come back to and whose voice was astonishingly beautiful. Dunigan would also strategically assign us copious amounts of listening. In my first year with him, he gave me Arthur Honegger’s solo flute piece Danse de la Chevre to learn, and with it came a list of Honegger’s other works to study, such as the orchestral tone poem Pacific 231, and the double concerto for flute and English horn. Absent from that list was the very piece I was learning, Danse de la Chevre, because his hope was for me to pick up on elements of Honegger’s style, not for me to simply copy professional flutists playing the same piece I was playing.

These two things I got first from Dunigan—sonic beauty and control and stylistic assimilation—came back in various guises through my other major flute teachers, especially Jim Walker and Marianne Gedigian. Walker would never, ever settle for anything less than my best sound all the time, and Gedigian has possibly the uncanniest ear for style of anyone I have ever met (and certainly of any flutist).

It’s no wonder that I view these same two things as the hallmarks of my teaching. Ask my students how much time we spend on sound in their lessons! (Answer: A LOT!) My philosophy is that for any musician to develop a voice worth listening to, they have to develop total control over their sound so that they have endless options to express what the composer is trying to express. This means doing a lot of listening—to singers, to violinists, to pianists, and occasionally, yes, to flutists—to build up huge sonic imaginations and a lot of practicing and experimenting to channel those imaginations through the flute.

As much as I have to say about sound, however, it, like all other aspects of musical execution, is subservient to style. I insist that my students spend a great deal of time researching, studying, and thinking about these aspects of music, because they determine how we proceed with everything else. Style is why the sound I use for Bach is different from the sound I use for Mozart, and why both are different from my sound for Brahms, for Varése, for Copland, and so on.

One final point I try to impart to my students that I learned from Jim Walker: being the best musician you can be is not a guarantee of success. There is nothing wrong with capitalizing on every skill you have. This mindset has not only led me to career success in areas outside playing and teaching the flute, such as community outreach, composing, and curriculum design, but it also has enriched my artistic life and my personal life.

What is one of your most memorable musical experiences? Most embarrassing?

One of my most magical memories comes from 2008, when my dear friend Greg Milliren (now associate principal flute of the Minnesota Orchestra) and I were each serving as co-principal flute in the American Youth Symphony in Los Angeles. Our gala concert that year featured the iconic film music of John Williams, conducted by the composer himself. The opportunity to play a whole program of this stunning music with wonderful friends and musicians, under Mr. Williams’ baton, was exciting beyond words.

As for embarrassing, I’d point to the 2006 Pasadena Showcase House Instrumental Competition, a major competition in Southern California. I had advanced to the final round and decided to up the stakes by playing some of my program from memory. Big risk sometimes equals big reward, but I fell hard that night. Even worse was learning after the fact that the jury anticipated that I would win after the semifinal round, when I did not play from memory. Needless to say, that did not happen. I am still mortified when I think about that experience. Memory does not equal artistry; and if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!

Timothy Hagen will perform a recital on March 18, 2 PM in Mills Hall.

For information or a sample lesson, contact: tmhagen2@wisc.edu

See Prof. Hagen’s personal website: http://www.timothyhagen.com/

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Announcing New Faculty at the Mead Witter School of Music

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Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Contact:

Katherine Esposito
608.263.5615
kesposito@wisc.edu

The Mead Witter School of Music is pleased to announce the hiring of new faculty. These include one new assistant professor and four new adjunct professors in addition to two instructors. Five of these new faculty replace retired professors John Aley, trumpet; James Smith, orchestra; Linda Bartley, clarinet (interim 2016-2017: Amy McCann); Richard Davis, bass; and Stephanie Jutt, flute.


Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet

Born into a musical family, Alicia Lee grew up in Michigan, where she began playing violin and piano at the age of five and switched to clarinet at the age of 12.

Before her appointment at the Mead Witter School of Music, she maintained a busy freelance career throughout New York City, performing and touring regularly with a variety of groups, including the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Knights, Alarm Will Sound, NOVUS, and ACME. She has performed at the Marlboro, Lucerne, Spoleto (Italy and US), Yellow Barn, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and Bay Chamber music festivals.

Lee is a founding member of Decoda, a chamber music collective comprised of virtuoso musicians, entrepreneurs, and passionate advocates of the arts. The artists of Decoda first collaborated with one another in the renowned Ensemble ACJW fellowship program, created by Carnegie Hall, and they now extend that relationship as the Affiliate Ensemble of Carnegie Hall. She has been fortunate to travel for residencies and performances in venues as diverse as the Guildhall School in London, Lee Correctional Institute in South Carolina, DePauw University, The Colburn School, and Merida, Mexico. She is also the director and on the faculty of the Decoda Skidmore Chamber Music Institute.

Lee is the newest member of the contemporary music group NOW Ensemble, a dynamic collective of composers and performers with the goal of creating music as a continuous collaboration between both parties. Lee was formerly the associate principal and E-flat clarinet player of the Santa Barbara Symphony, a position she held for seven seasons. She also performed as solo bass clarinetist of the Bergen Philharmonic in Norway during the 2013-14 season. She holds a bachelor’s degree in French lLanguage and literature from Columbia University, and pursued musical studies at The Juilliard School with Charles Neidich and Ayako Oshima as a part of the Columbia-Juilliard exchange program. She earned additional degrees from the University of Southern California and The Colburn School, where she was a student of Yehuda Gilad.

Chad Hutchinson, adjunct professor of orchestras

Newly appointed conductor Chad Hutchinson will lead the Symphony Orchestra, All-University Strings, and University Opera productions. He will also teach undergraduate and graduate conducting courses.

The past two seasons, Hutchinson was assistant conductor of the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra and music director of the South Dakota Symphony Youth Orchestras. During his tenure, he led the SDSO in numerous pops concerts including artists Ben Folds, Michael Cavanaugh and Steve Lippia, implemented the orchestra’s inaugural season of Carnegie Hall’s Link Up program in a partnership with the Sioux Falls Public School District, conducted Family Concerts and led the annual “Christmas on the Prairie” concert in Hoven, SD. Working with students ages 8-18 and conducting three of the four ensembles within the organization, Hutchinson helped the SDSYO grow to the largest enrollment in the program’s history, gaining over 75 students in two seasons. As part of its commitment to new music, each SDSYO ensemble featured a living composer on every concert in the 2016-2017 season. In addition, the Youth Orchestra performed works by and had residencies with John Luther Adams and Theodore Wiprud while also being one of only three youth ensembles in the country to premiere “Dreamtime Ancestors” by Christopher Theofanidis.

As comfortable in the pit as on the stage, he has recently led productions of Suor Angelica, Le Nozze di Figaro, Susannah and Lady in the Dark with University Opera Theater at the University of Minnesota and The Mikado at Morningside College. Last year he was awarded third place in the American Prize in Opera Conducting and was recently a finalist for the 2017 Pierre Monteux Prize in conducting.

With a long-standing commitment to education, Hutchinson taught orchestra in the public schools for nine years in Williamsville, NY and Sioux Falls, SD with both programs doubling in size during his tenure. He later taught collegiately at Iowa’s Northwestern College and was the coordinator and music director of the Siouxland Youth Orchestras in Sioux City, Iowa. He has served as a guest conductor for numerous orchestras and festivals throughout the Midwest, Montana and New York and will return for his third summer on the conducting faculty of the International Music Camp. As a conducting fellow, he has been selected to participate in conducting workshops at the Juilliard School, Eastman School of Music, the New England Conservatory of Music, the Richmond Symphony and the Bohuslav Martinu Philharmonic Orchestra.

An Iowa native, Hutchinson holds conducting degrees from the University of Minnesota and Bowling Green State University and a bachelor’s degree in music education from Morningside College. Away from the University, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two daughters, training for triathlons and rooting for the Kansas City Royals.

Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz percussion and jazz history

Born in Sauk City, Matthew Endres received his bachelor’s of music degree at UW-Stevens Point, his master’s degree in jazz studies from the University of Illinois, and his doctoral degree in jazz studies and ethnomusicology at the University of Illinois. Endres has performed extensively as a bandleader and as a sideman in national and international venues. He is the drummer for the Downbeat award winning group “Old Style Sextet.” In 2014, they performed in the world renowned Cotai Jazz and Blues Festival in Macau, China. Endres has appeared on multiple albums including the “Old Style Sextet” self-titled album under “blu jazz records” (2014); “It’s About Time” (2013) with the “Adrian Barnett Septet”; Chris Beyt’s “120” (2015); The Clark Gibson Studio Orchestra’s record entitled “Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements” under “blu jazz records” (2015); and the yet-to-be-released University of Illinois Concert Jazz Band’s record entitled “The Music of Pepper Adams.”

Endres was a top three finalist for the nationally renowned premier big bands “The Jazz Ambassadors” and the “Army Blues,” two of the top big bands in the country. He has been fortunate to work with talented artists including Chris Potter, Doc Severinson, Rufus Reid, Brad Leali, Chris Brubeck, Charles McPhearson, Frank Gambale, Tom Garling, Victor Garcia, Michael Blum, Shawn Purcell, Darden Purcell, Oliver Nelson Jr, Jim Pugh, Dave Pietro, Grammy award winner Charles “Chip” McNeill, Ron Bridgwater, Dave D’Angelo, Carlos Vega, Larry Gray, Glenn Wilson, Richard Drexler, Mark Colby, Alex Graham, Clark Gibson, Tito Carrillo, John “Chip” Stephens, Joan Hickey, and Adrian Barnett. Endres currently holds an endorsement with Bopworks Drumsticks, based in Austin, Texas.

Alex Noppe, adjunct professor of trumpet

Green Bay native Alex Noppe has had a diverse performing and teaching career as a soloist, chamber musician, orchestral player, and jazz/commercial artist. He is a founding member of and the resident composer/arranger for the Mirari Brass Quintet, which for eight years has performed in concert halls, universities, schools, and churches in over 30 states and China. Alex has performed with numerous other ensembles across the country, holding positions in the Lansing Symphony, Columbus-Indiana Philharmonic, Monroe Symphony, and the Terre Haute Symphony. He has also performed with the Charlotte Symphony, Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Opera, Boise Philharmonic, Shreveport Symphony, and many others. Additional performing credits include the Indianapolis Jazz Orchestra, Hal Leonard Jazz Orchestra, David Baker Big Band, and the Diamond Empire Band. As a chamber musician, he has performed across the United States and in Thailand with the Black Bayou Brass Trio as well as many brass quintets. Alex has played for five years with the Louis Romanos Quartet, which fuses New Orleans jazz with Latin and world music in a variety of rhythmic patterns. LRQ has released several recordings, toured across the country, and performed on the Jazz Maui Festival. He has appeared on stage or performed with Eric Alexander, Chris Potter, Randy Brecker, Wayne Bergeron, Johnny Mathis, Hank Jones, the Count Basie Orchestra, the Rolling Stones Project, Sylvia McNair, Byron Stripling, Wycliffe Gordon, John Clayton, Leonard Slatkin, and Garrison Keillor.

Alex has been featured as a soloist with the Green Bay Civic Symphony, Boise State Orchestra, Performing Arts Institute Wind Ensemble, Indiana University Singers, ULM Symphony Orchestra, and was the solo “cellophonist” on David Baker’s Concerto for Cell Phones and Orchestra with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. He has been a performer or clinician at the International Association of Jazz Educators Conference, the Big XII Trombone Conference, the NAfME Northwest Conference, the International Tuba & Euphonium Conference, the International Trumpet Guild Conference, and the College Music Society National Conference. From 2004 to 2010 he served as Director of Jazz at the Performing Arts Institute summer music festival and also has taught at the UW-Green Bay Summer Music Clinic and Boise State Chamber Music Camp. Alex was the organizer and inaugural director of the Idaho All-State Jazz Ensemble, and has served as a clinician/guest artist for festivals in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Louisiana, Indiana, Michigan, Nebraska, and Wisconsin. For four years, he served as executive director of the Gene Harris Jazz Festival in Boise.

In addition to numerous compositions and arrangements written for the Mirari Brass, he has had works premiered by the Arbor Brass Choir, University of Michigan Jazz Ensemble, and Black Bayou Brass. Recording credits include Smack Dab in the Middle from John Clayton and the Hal Leonard Jazz Orchestra, Celestial Dancers by the Philharmonia a Vent, and William Bolcom: Songs of Innocence and Experience featuring Leonard Slatkin and the University of Michigan Symphony Orchestra, which was awarded three Grammy awards in 2006. Alex can be heard on numerous recordings from the Hal Leonard Music Company and FJH Music, and is featured on recent critically acclaimed releases from the Mirari Brass Quintet and the Wave Mechanics Union, as well as the multiple recent albums from the Louis Romanos Quartet.

Prior to his appointment at UW-Madison, Alex has held teaching positions at Boise State University, the University of Louisiana-Monroe, and has additionally taught at Indiana State University, Depauw University, and Indiana University. He holds a doctoral degree in brass literature and pedagogy from Indiana University as well as a master’s of music in trumpet performance from IU, studying with John Rommel, Anthony Plog, and David Baker. He also has dual bachelor degrees in trumpet performance and jazz studies from the University of Michigan, where he studied with William Campbell, William Lucas, Ellen Rowe, and Dennis Wilson. Alex is a Conn-Selmer Endorsing Artist and plays on Bach trumpets.

Timothy Hagen, adjunct professor of flute

Newly appointed to the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Timothy Hagen is an internationally acclaimed flutist, praised for his “technical virtuosity and musical sensitivity” (NewMusicBox). He won first prize as well as the award for Best Performance of the Newly Composed Work (Gary Schocker’s Prestidigitation, or POOF!) at the 2016 Myrna W. Brown Artist Competition, sponsored by the Texas Flute Society. Past awards include second prize at the Australian International Flute Competition, the Jack Smith Memorial Award for Most Promising Talent at the Pasadena Showcase House Instrumental Competition, two artist grants from the Léni Fé Bland Foundation, and the prestigious graduate scholarship from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. He was also the only American semifinalist named in the 2007 Jeunesses Musicales International Flute Competition in Serbia.

As principal flute of the Missouri Symphony, Hagen spends his summers in Columbia, MO, where he has performed multiple times as a concerto soloist. He has also substituted regularly with the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas and as principal flute with the Dallas Wind Symphony. Over the past decade, he has been active as a guest musician with ensembles throughout the country, including the Minnesota Orchestra, San Antonio Symphony, Eugene Symphony, Midland-Odessa Symphony, Las Colinas Symphony, and Winston-Salem Symphony. In addition, he has had solo debuts at New York’s Lincoln Center and 92nd Street Y and performed at the Atlantic, Hot Springs, and Las Vegas Music Festivals, as well as the Norfolk and Austin Chamber Music Festivals.

The depth and breadth of Hagen’s experience as an educator distinguish him. In addition to his current role at UW-Madison, he has taught at Oklahoma State University, The University of Texas at Austin, Lincoln Center, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Dallas Symphony, and Brookhaven College, among many other fine institutions. His students have consistently won regional and national awards and auditions, and he is in high demand as a teacher, clinician, and speaker at universities, festivals, and conventions throughout the United States, Canada, and Australia. He is also frequently called upon as an adjudicator on regional and national levels, including for the National Flute Association’s Young Artist and Piccolo Artist competitions.

Increasingly in demand as a composer, Hagen has won awards from the American Composers Forum and MetLife Creative Connections. His chamber and solo works for flute, published by Owl Glass Music, have been commissioned and performed throughout the United States and were mentioned favorably in the February 2014 issue of Flute Talk. He composed the newly commissioned work for the Texas Flute Society’s 2017 Myrna W. Brown Artist Competition, and upcoming commissions include a piece for alto flute and piano for Marianne Gedigian (Professor of Flute at the University of Texas at Austin), and a work for piccolo and piano to honor the legacy of longtime Cincinnati Symphony solo piccoloist, Jack Wellbaum. His pedagogical and scholarly work is published by Owl Glass and in national and international journals, such as the NFA’s Flutist Quarterly and the British Flute Society’s Pan.

Service to his musical community is also important to Hagen, as demonstrated in his volunteer roles. He is currently on the National Flute Association’s pedagogy committee and co-coordinates its annual Youth Flute Day. Additionally, he served as board member and master class coordinator for the Texas Flute Society from 2014-2017 and as corporate sponsorship chair on the board of the award-winning Flute New Music Consortium from 2015-2016.

Hagen received his DMA from the University of Texas at Austin, a professional studies certificate from the Colburn School, a master’s degree in music from the University of Southern California, and a bachelor’s degree in music from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. His former flute teachers include Jim Walker, Marianne Gedigian, Philip Dunigan, Renée Siebert, Tadeu Coelho, Chelsea Czuchra, Felicia McNaught, and Tina Ballard.

David Scholl, instructor of double bass

Double bassist David Scholl, newly appointed to the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, currently serves as principal bass of the Madison, Quad City, and Dubuque Symphonies. He frequently appears with Elgin, Rockford, and South Bend Symphonies, among others, and was previously a member of the Illinois Symphony. David is also active in the new music community, including appearances as a guest artist on Chicago Symphony’s MusicNOW series, University of Chicago’s Contempo series, and with the Spektral Quartet.

In addition to his work as a performer, David maintains an active private studio. He also appears as a guest clinician in music programs in and around the Midwest. A product of the public school system himself, David makes it a priority to present in public schools and non-profit music programs, including UW-Madison’s Summer Music Clinic.

David was born and raised in Bellevue, Washington and started bass in fifth grade. He received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Indiana University, where he studied bass with Bruce Bransby. While there he also studied historical performance from distinguished professor Stanley Ritchie, and spent the summers studying bass with Owen Lee, Jeff Turner, and Peter Lloyd. David continued studies as a fellow at the Aspen Music Festival and at the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, where he was principal bass and studied with Alex Hanna.

Matthew Richardson, instructor of musicology

Matthew Richardson, associate instructor of ethnomusicology, has taught world music at UW-Madison since fall of 2016. Earlier that year, he completed his Ph.D in musicology at Northwestern University; his primary research investigates aesthetics and fan culture in the Japanese pop music genre known as idol music. He uses approaches from semiotics, mediation, and aesthetic philosophy to understand the role music plays in cultures’ attempts to understand one another. His other research interests include the introduction of European music to mid-nineteenth-century Japan and representations of Japan in U.S. and European culture. His master’s degree is also from Northwestern, and he earned a bachelor’s degree in music history from Oberlin College, minoring in trombone. (Photograph coming soon.)

Take your pick: School of Music overflowing all April with beautiful noise

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wednesday, April 5, 2017

For this issue, we’ve prepared a special e-blast of selected final concerts at the School of Music. Many more, including student recitals and small ensemble concerts, can be found on our events calendar.

We hope you will make time to attend at least one!  (Click links to read musician biographies and learn about concert programs.)

The Perlman Trio holds its annual recital

Saturday, April 8, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The trio, comprised of Chan Mi Jean, piano; Adam Dorn, violin; and Micah Cheng, cello, is sponsored by longtime donor Kato Perlman. The ensemble is chosen carefully to blend personalities and styles, and each spring concert is a treat for audiences. This year’s trio will present works of Haydn, Dvorak, and Brahms. There will be a reception after the concert.

The 2016-2017 Perlman Trio: Micah Cheng, viola; Chan Mi Jean, piano; and Adam Dorn, violin. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

32nd Annual Beethoven Piano Competition winners recital

2017 Beethoven Competition winners Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
This long-running event is sponsored by former UW-Madison chancellor Irving Shain. The 2017 winners are Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. The program will include Beethoven’s Sonata in C Major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”) (Kangwoo Jin); the Sonata in E Major, Op. 109 (Leah Kang); and the Sonata in A Major, Op. 101 (Alberto Peña-Cortes).


UW Symphony Orchestra Farewell Concert with Conductor James Smith

James Smith rehearses the UW Symphony for its final concert with him as conductor. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Professor James Smith, conductor of the UW Symphony and University Opera, came to UW-Madison in 1984 to conduct the Wind and Symphonic Ensembles and assumed orchestral conducting duties following the departure of David Becker. He has also served as longtime conductor of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra and will retire from that post as well.
Smith was a professional clarinetist prior to becoming a conductor.


The Hunt Quartet presents a spring concert

The Hunt Quartet, 2016-2017. L-R: Kyle Price, cello.; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; Chang-En Lu, violin. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Tuesday, April 11, 8:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The Hunt Quartet is the graduate string quartet at the School of Music, co-sponsored by Kato Perlman and the Madison Symphony Orchestra. The Quartet is an integral part of the Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Up Close and Musical” program, visiting area schools to teach students about fundamentals of music and the string quartet. This year’s members are Kyle Price, cello; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; and Chang-En Lu, violin.


Stephanie Jutt: Final Faculty Recital

Stephanie Jutt. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Thursday, April 13, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Flutist Stephanie Jutt bids farewell after 27 years
While at UW-Madison, Professor Stephanie Jutt founded Bach Dancing & Dynamite, a summer chamber music festival; UW-Madison’s Arts Venture Challenge; and shepherded many flutists through undergraduate and graduate work. She plans to continue as principal flutist with the Madison Symphony Orchestra and as artistic director of Bach Dancing & Dynamite.


Emery Stephens: African-American Songs and Spirituals

(Rescheduled from March 13)
Wednesday, April 12, 6:30 PM, Music Hall.  Free event.
Emery Stephens, baritone, is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals. Students will perform in a recital with Stephens and collaborative pianist professor Martha Fischer in a concert.


Pro Arte Quartet with guest artist Jazimina Macneil, mezzo-soprano

Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

The Pro Arte’s  final concert of the academic year will feature a rising star singer and a world premiere by composer John Harbison.

String Quartet in E Major, Op. 54 No. 3 (1788)
Joseph Haydn

The Cross of Snow for Contralto and String Quartet (2016)
John Harbison
World Premiere of Version for Voice and String Quartet

String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 16 (1874)
Antonín Dvořák


Annual Varsity Band Concerts with Mike Leckrone

Mike Leckrone at the Cotton Bowl, January 2017. Photograph by Gary Smith.

April 20, 21 and 22, Kohl Center, 601 Dayton Street. All shows 7 PM. $23. Buy tickets.
Help us welcome Mike Leckrone back from his recent surgery! Learn more here.


UW Wind Ensemble

Scott Teeple, conductor.
Wednesday, April 26, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.   Free event.

Scott Teeple. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

The Wind Ensemble offers a Wisconsin premiere of a work by Japanese composer Jun Nagao, and the Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble by Igor Stravinsky with Christopher Taylor on piano.

Guest bassist Linda Oh performs with Jazz Orchestra and UW High School Honors Jazz Band

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Music Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.
Additional events Tuesday -Thursday in Morphy Hall; click here for more information.
Johannes Wallmann, director

Our annual spring Jazz Fest features talented high school jazz musicians, who rehearse with the UW Jazz Orchestra and a guest. This year, our guest is bassist Linda Oh from New York City, who is featured on the cover of April’s Jazz Times magazine. Oh has played with many top musicians; she’ll appear with Pat Metheny at Ravinia on June 14. The week’s events include two free concerts and a ticketed concert on Friday night.

 


UW Concert Choir with cellist Matt Haimovitz

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Presenting “Après moi, le deluge” by composer Luna Pearl Woolf
and “for Paris,” a world premiere for solo viola and choir by UW-Madison composer Laura Schwendinger.

With the Concert Choir and Sally Chisholm, violist of the Pro Arte Quartet.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

“Ferociously talented” (New York Times) cellist Matt Haimovitz, known for his renditions of the Bach Cello Suites as well as Radiohead, will return to Madison on April 28 to perform a work that he premiered here 11 years ago with the UW Concert Choir, one of UW-Madison’s most advanced choirs.

Read full news release here.

Watch: Matt Haimovitz & Christopher O’Riley: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert, 2015


UW Choral Union & UW Symphony Orchestra

Saturday, April 29 (8 PM) and Sunday, April 30 (7:30 PM), Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$8 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

Presenting Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d (text by Walt Whitman).

A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois. The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington. The work is in memory of “those we loved.”

Below: The New York Philharmonic performed this work in 1946.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

A musical thank-you to the Mead Witter Foundation; Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Winners Announced; New Music Premieres & Papers at Musicology Consortium: “Jewish Archive” Project Continues Worldwide

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
March 8, 2017

Faculty Ensembles combine with Lincoln High students for a memorable concert

On February 9, two School of Music faculty ensembles – the Wisconsin Brass Quintet and the Wingra Wind Quintet – traveled to Wisconsin Rapids, the home of the Mead Witter Foundation, for a special concert to thank them for their support of the school of music. The two ensembles, plus the Wind Ensemble from Lincoln High School in Wisconsin Rapids, performed a side-by-side concert at the Performing Arts Center of Wisconsin Rapids after the students were coached by ensemble faculty and UW-Madison conductor Scott Teeple.

Afterwards, music engagement and outreach coordinator Beth Larson received this note from Jeanne Olson, director of bands at Lincoln High School: “Thank you so much for all of the time you spent organizing that event, my students loved it and learned so much! I had them write a reflection this week, and they were very positive and many listed countless things that they learned from the professors sitting in with them and then working with the small groups!! It was a very successful event!”
Photographs by Beth Larson.

Irving Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Competition Winners to perform this Saturday

Irving Shain, former chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Photograph by Jeff Miller, university communications.

March 11, 4 PM, Morphy Hall.

This years’ duo winners are Rayna Slavova, piano with Chia-Yu Hsu, bassoon; and Kangwoo Jin, piano, with Eleni Katz, bassoon. The four will perform their winning selections at a free concert this Saturday.  Learn about the winning musicians and download the program.

Meet Yasha Hoffman, Russian Studies and composition double major

Yasha Hoffman.

Yasha Hoffman, a Minnesota native, grew up with parents of Soviet/Russian heritage and as a young child, fell in love with Russian folk songs. “One of my favorite activities was putting on ‘concerts’ for my parents where I’d loudly sing Soviet children’s songs and bang on the piano,” he says. He loves the breadth of opportunity offered by classes at UW-Madison. Read more about Yasha Hoffman.

“Performing the Jewish Archive” project continues worldwide

UW-Madison professor Teri Dobbs in Israel, Jordan, Michigan, and Vienna (upcoming)

This past January, Professor Teri Dobbs, a member of the Performing the Jewish Archive team, spent two weeks in Israel and Jordan. During her time there, she was a guest at Tel Aviv University’s Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, together with colleagues from UW-Madison’s Mosse-Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies. In addition, she conducted research in the Yad Vashem Archives, met with musicology/music education colleagues to discuss the possibility of future projects within Israel, and met with the family of piano prodigy and composer, Josima Feldschuh (d. 1943).

Teri Dobbs
Professor Teryl Dobbs. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Professor Dobbs will present several conference papers this coming semester, most of which pertain to her work with Performing the Jewish Archive. Her paper, “Music Education and the Holocaust: So What?” was heard at the New Directions in Music Education Conference: “Musicking Equity: Enacting Social Justice Through Music Education,” Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, February 17. Dobbs has been invited to present more two papers, one in collaboration with soprano and PtJA performer Elizabeth Hagedorn of Vienna, at the 25th European Association for Music in Schools/6th European International Society for Music Education regional conference, JOINT (AD)VENTURE MUSIC: Network as a Challenge for Music Educators, at the University Mozarteum, Salzburg, Austria, April 18 – 22, 2017.
Learn more here.

Read about prior Performing the Jewish Archive events in Madison, 2015-2016.


Selected Upcoming Events

Anthony Georgeson. Photograph by Thomas Bruce.

March 12, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.
UW Symphony with alumnus Anthony Georgeson, bassoon, conducted by James Smith. Georgeson is principal bassoon with The Florida Orchestra in St. Petersburg. Georgeson will play the Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191.  Other works will include Un Sourire pour Orchestre by Olivier Messiaen and Scheherazade by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.  This is the penultimate opportunity to see longtime conductor James Smith, who will retire this spring after 34 years at UW-Madison. His final appearance as conductor will be on April 9. 

James Smith, orchestra conductor.
James Smith, orchestra conductor.

March 14, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall.
Emery Stephens, baritone, guest artist recital. Free concert.
Stephens is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit. Prof. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals and perform with students in a recital, with Professor Martha Fischer as collaborative pianist.

Emery Stephens

The Midwest Graduate Music Consortium – Presenting Original Research and New Compositions

Friday, March 31 and Saturday, April 1, Memorial Union and Mead Witter School of Music. Free events.

The Midwest Graduate Music Consortium (MGMC) is a joint venture organized by graduate students from Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. MGMC encourages the presentation of original research and the composition of new music by graduate students around the country. The 21st annual meeting will include paper sessions, a new music concert, and a keynote address. For the new music concert, seven composers’ works were chosen from a nationwide call for scores. The ensemble Sound Out Loud will perform the new works, each a world premiere. All of the composers will be in attendance.
Find the schedule and concert program at this link:
Midwest Graduate Music Consortium

Sound Out Loud

University Opera’s “Turn of the Screw” receives warm reviews

Katie Anderson (Governess) and Anna Polum (Miss Jessel) in ”The Turn of the Screw.” Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

“Much of the overall success of the show begins with decisions by Ronis (and executed by costume designers Sydney Krieger and Hyewon Park) to resist all temptation to make the specters of Quint (former valet of Bly’s master, who is far removed from the action of the story) and former governess Miss Jessel in any way ghoulish. Alec Brown and Anna Polum, in the roles on Friday night, looked fully human—and that’s just fine. The otherworldliness—and palpable evil—that they exude is in the music and the libretto itself,” wrote Greg Hettsmanberger in his blog, What Greg Says.

Doctoral cellist Andrew Briggs performs with Middleton Community Orchestra

At the March 1 concert of the Middleton Community Orchestra, cellist Andrew Briggs played two works by Antonin Dvorak: Silent Woods, Op. 68, No. 5,and Rondo in G minor for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 94. “Briggs played both of these with affectionate sensitivity. Currently finishing his doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music, he is an artist with an already expanding reputation and a great future,” wrote reviewer John Barker.

Andrew Briggs

On Monday, March 27, Andrew will perform a lecture/recital on his dissertation project, “Piatti and the Body: An Integrative Approach to Learning and Performing the 12 Caprices, Op. 25.”

Morphy Hall, 6:30 PM. Free.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

“Symphony Showcase” concerto winners Feb 12; UW Opera Announces Spring Show; Schwendinger’s “Artemisia” Premieres in NYC

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music – February 2, 2017

For Valentine’s Day: “Love Story, Steinway Version”

A treasured 1927 Steinway Baby Grand Piano, Model M, finds a new home at the Mead Witter School of Music. Click to read the story and view images behind the School’s newest donation, inspired by love.

mom_dadcrop


“Symphony Showcase” Concerto winners recital returns to delight and thrill

Watching a young musician solo on stage is always a treat, and every year we’re happy to show you some of our most talented, many already professionals. Please join us on Sunday, Feb. 12 at 7:30 PM in Mills Hall to hear and congratulate our students. Adult tickets are $10; children and all students are free. Tickets will be sold at the door. New this year: A reception at the University Club following the concert. The reception is included in the ticket price.

L-R: Shuk-Ki Wong; Matthew Lee; Anna Polum; Matthew Onstad; Biffa Kwok. Photograph by Hannah Olson.
L-R: Shuk-Ki Wong; Matthew Lee; Anna Polum; Matthew Onstad; Biffa Kwok. Not pictured: Nathan Froebe, composer. Photograph by Hannah Olson.

2016-2017 winners are:

  • Violinist Shing Fung (Biffa) Kwok, a doctoral student of Prof. David Perry and recipient of a Collins Fellowship. He will perform Tzigane by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937). Biffa is from Hong Kong.
  • Violinist Matthew Lee is an undergraduate senior, graduate of the Madison Memorial High School and alumnus of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras. Matthew studies with Prof. Soh-Hyun Altino. He will perform the cadenza from the Violin Concerto No. 1 in A Minor, opus 77 of Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975).
  • Trumpeter Matthew Onstad, a native of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Matt is a master’s student of Prof. John Aley. He’ll perform the Trumpet Concerto in F Minor, Op. 18 by Oskar Böhme (1870-1938). Read about Matt in the Beaver Dam Daily Citizen: Beaver Dam native soars as trumpet player in Madison.
  • Soprano Anna Polum will sing “Amour, ranime mon courage,” written by Charles Gounod (1818-1893) for his opera adaptation of Romeo and Juliet. Anna studies with Professor James Doing and hails from Fairbanks, Alaska.
  • Pianist Shuk-Ki Wong, will perform the first movement of the Piano Concerto in G Major by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937). Shuk-ki studies with Professors Jessica Johnson and Christopher Taylor.
  • Composer Nathan Froebe, a doctoral student of Prof. Laura Schwendinger. The orchestra will perform the premiere of his Portrait d’une Femme, written for his friend and colleague, mezzo-soprano Jessica Kasinski.

University Opera to stage Britten’s “The Turn of the Screw” in March

Fresh from winning two major awards in the 2015-16 National Opera Association Competition, University Opera will present Benjamin Britten’s gothic ghost story, The Turn of the Screw, to round out its season.  In this, Britten’s last chamber opera, based on the Henry James novella of the same title, terror takes unexpected forms.  Premiered in 1954, The Turn of the Screw tells of a young governess who is hired to care for two children in an isolated country house in late 19th century England.  She soon realizes that the children are haunted by secrets and spirits that harm them in very real ways and she takes it upon herself to defend them.  In so doing, she is forced to confront the demons she perceives as threats, as well as her own internal ones.

Benjamin Britten in the mid-1960s (photograph by Hans Wild).
Benjamin Britten in the mid-1960s (photograph by Hans Wild).

The Turn of the Screw will be presented in English for three performances, all with projected supertitles.  March 3 at 7:30 PM, March 5 at 3:00 PM, and March 7 at 7:30 PM at Music Hall on the UW-Madison campus.  David Ronis, inaugural Karen K. Bishop Director of University Opera, will direct and graduate conducting assistant Kyle Knox will conduct the 13-member chamber orchestra.  Musical preparation will be by University Opera’s new vocal coach, Daniel Fung.

Click to read full news release.

Schwendinger opera “Artemisia” receives New York premiere

Next performance: Spring 2018, in San Francisco with the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble

On January 7, UW-Madison composer Laura Schwendinger unveiled Artemisia, a major new opera, at Trinity Church Wall Street in New York City as part of its Time’s Arrow Festival.  The opera is a story of passion, betrayal and art in 17th century Italy based on the life of Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi. With a libretto by Ginger Strand, author of The Brothers Vonnegut, Artemisia is a recipient of a National Opera Center Discovery grant.

Real-life drama: Schwendinger’s “Artemisia” opera will premiere in New York City: Isthmus, 1.5.17

Preview in Broadway World, 1.7.17

Click to watch video of Artemisia’s premiere


Selected upcoming concerts and events:

Pro Arte Quartet, Saturday, Feb 4. With guest pianist Jee-Won Oh.

Wisconsin Brass Quintet, Final concert with retiring trumpeter John Aley, Sunday, Feb 26

Student Recitals: All semester.

Music Master Classes: Opportunities to observe guest musicians as they instruct and engage with college students.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Two More Opera Awards; Jazz Program Highlighted; Student Spotlight; Opportunities for Community Members

Happy New Year from the Mead Witter School of Music! And welcome to the first issue of A Tempo! for 2017

Two More Awards for UW-Madison University Opera

University Opera scores again with national recognition

Awards for two shows in 2015-2016

UW-Madison’s University Opera is on a roll. Both shows from last year, Transformations and Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro, have won awards in the National Opera Association’s (NOA) Opera Production Competition for 2015-2016. It is the second year in a row that UW-Madison has garnered an award from NOA, and the first time that each production was separately recognized. University Opera produces only two operas each year.

William Ottow and Rebecca Buechel in Transformations. Image by Michael R. Anderson.
William Ottow and Rebecca Buechel in Transformations. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

October 2015’s Le nozze di Figaro, with orchestra conducted by James Smith, placed second in Division IV, and March 2016’s Transformations, conducted by graduate assistant conductor Kyle Knox, garnered a first place award in Division III.

Both productions were directed by David Ronis, inaugural Karen K. Bishop Director of Opera, who is now a six-time winner of the competition. His previous awards occurred while he worked at Queens College in New York.

Read the full news release.

UW-Madison Jazz Program highlighted- twice!

In December, Madison’s weekly newspaper Isthmus devoted a cover story to our burgeoning jazz program and its director, Johannes Wallmann

“By bringing more jazz to the university and beyond, Wallmann hopes to promote the notion that jazz isn’t just about the past, with its storied history and legendary names. It’s now also about highly trained musicians pushing the boundaries of the genre,” wrote author Jane Burns in her story, “Making a Scene.”

“ ‘Look up any end-of-the-year Top 10 list on NPR, Downbeat or The New York Times, and listen to what this generation of 20- and 30-somethings are up to, it’ll blow your mind,’ ” Wallmann says. “ ‘We want to prepare our students to be part of that.’ ”

…meanwhile, Wisconsin Public TV spotlights the jazz program as part of its “Young Performers” Initiative

For over a year, a dedicated crew from WPT – including alumna Megan Aley, who served as a producer – filmed Wallmann and his staff as they shepherded high school students through auditions for the UW High School Honors Jazz Band. The videos are intended to help aspiring musicians prepare for professional careers and college auditions.

New videos from Making Jazz web series will be released each Monday through Feb. 6. Learn more about the Young Performers Initiative and sign up for weekly releases of the jazz videos.

Meet our students: Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo, bassoonist

Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo came from the country of Colombia to study bassoon performance with Marc Vallon, professor of bassoon.  We asked her how she became involved in music, with the bassoon, and why she chose Wisconsin.

Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo
Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo

“I did my undergrad in music performance in the University El Bosque in Bogotá. I studied with Leonardo Guevara, the principal bassoonist of the National Symphony Orchestra. I learned very much while at school and I was able to play with many chamber ensembles when I was still in school. My first job as a bassoonist was in the Symphonic Band of Cundinamarca, and I worked there for a year during my last year of school. It was challenging, but I learned very much from this experience.

“In 2010, I received a master’s in bassoon performance with Saxton Rose at the University of North Carolina-School of the Arts. As I started to look into going back to school, I talked him, and he recommended that I applied to study with Marc Vallon at UW-Madison. I think it is one of the best decisions I have made in my life!”

Read Juliana’s story here, and click the arrow to learn about more of our students.

Two Community Opportunities – Deadlines Included

Sing with Choral Union this spring! Drop-in auditions will be held on January 18 for community members interested in singing a rare work: Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d. A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois.  The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington.  The work is in memory of “those we loved.”  Two concerts, April 29 & 30. Learn more here. 

Inviting high school pianists to take part in Pathways to Artistry: From the Practice Room to the Stage. A free, day-long event featuring workshops, masterclasses and performances hosted by UW-Madison’s keyboard faculty. High school pianists are encouraged to participate in the master classes and an honors recital.  More information and registration is at the link below. The deadline to register is January 31.

http://www.music.wisc.edu/event/pathways-to-artistry-uw-madison-keyboard-day/

pathways-to-artistry-graphic

Two Concerts – Seats Available

Sunday, January 22, 4 PM, Mills Hall

Sonatas for Violin and Piano

Violinist Soh-Hyun Altino and pianist Christopher Taylor, both faculty artists, perform the Sonata for Violin and Piano by John Corigliano (1963) and the Sonata in A Major by Gabriel Fauré (1875-76). Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for non-UW music students.  Learn more here.

Sunday, January 29, 3 PM, Mills Hall

Our Annual Schubertiade: “Circle of Friends”

This year’s Schubertiade with pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes will feature acclaimed alumna soprano Emily Birsan.  The concert will be followed by a reception (included in the ticket cost) at the University Club. Tickets are $15 per adult and $5 for non-UW music students. The concert is sponsored by Madison resident Ann Boyer, an admirer of Franz Schubert’s music and the musical talents of Fischer and Lutes. Learn more here.

Emily Birsan
Emily Birsan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alumni News

We want to hear from you- please click the link to read about our graduates and send your news!

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

2017 Schubertiade to feature acclaimed soprano Emily Birsan

ALSO IN JANUARY: Violinist Soh-Hyun Altino and pianist Christopher Taylor team up for an afternoon of exquisite sonatas from Fauré and Corigliano. Sunday, January 22, 4 PM. Learn more here.


Join pianists Martha Fischer, Bill Lutes, and friends on the stage and seats of Mills Hall for January’s “Schubertiade,” an intimate homage to the music, loves and life of Romantic composer Franz Schubert.

The concert will take place Sunday, January 29, at a new time, 3:00 PM.

Fischer is a UW-Madison professor of collaborative piano and piano and Bill Lutes is emeritus artist-in-residence.

Martha Fischer & Bill Lutes. Image by Katrin Talbot.
Martha Fischer & Bill Lutes. Image by Katrin Talbot.

The concert will be followed by a reception (included in the ticket cost) at the University Club. Tickets are $15 per adult and $5 for students, available online, at the Memorial Union Box Office, or at the door.  The concert is sponsored by Madison resident Ann Boyer, an admirer of Franz Schubert’s music and the musical talents of Fischer and Lutes.

The evening will include a special guest, the much-acclaimed soprano and UW-Madison alumna, Emily Birsan. Among other works, she will sing Schubert’s Epistle to Josef von Spaun, D. 749 – a brilliant and humorous send-up of the Italian operatic style that was all the rage in Vienna during Schubert’s lifetime.

Emily Birsan
Emily Birsan

Other performers will include Mead-Witter School of Music faculty Mimmi Fulmer, soprano and Paul Rowe, baritone; School of Music alumni Daniel O’ Dea, tenor and Benjamin Schultz, baritone; and current graduate students Anna Polum, soprano, Rebecca Bechtel and Jessica Kasinski, mezzo sopranos, and Wesley Dunnagan, tenor.

Schubert was born on January 31, 1797, and lived only 31 years. In his day, his music was cherished, but mostly by his personal circle. UW-Madison’s “Schubertiade” extends that circle to include the entire seating chart in Mills Hall.

The theme for this year’s Schubertiade is “Circle of Friends,” says co-organizer Lutes.

He writes: “Moritz von Schwind, a important German painter of the 19th century, was a young man when he became part of the group that was present at the first Schubertiade — those social gatherings given over to charades, poetry reading, dancing and imbibing – but most particularly to the performance of Schubert’s music, often with the composer himself at the piano.

“These almost legendary occasions were immortalized by Schwind in his famous painting ‘A Schubert Evening at Josef von Spaun’s,’ created in 1868, when these glorious moments had become distant and cherished memories. Schubert is indeed at the piano, with the great baritone Johann Michael Vogel seated to the composer’s right. Depicted are many of the poets, artists, lawyers and civil servants, and close friends who first heard Schubert’s music. In some cases, they are individuals with whom Schubert collaborated in the creation of songs, and our program will include a many settings of poetry by Schubert’s friends: Schober, Mayrhofer, Spaun, Schlechta and others.

 

A Schubert Evening at the Home of Josef von Spaun on December 15, 1826. Sepia drawing by Moritz von Schwind (1804-1871), 1868.
A Schubert Evening at the Home of Josef von Spaun on December 15, 1826. Sepia drawing by Moritz von Schwind (1804-1871), 1868.

“In addition we will include a group of songs that Schubert assembled in 1816 and presented to Theresa Grob, a young soprano whom he had hoped to marry. Other highlights will be a Cantata written for the birthday of Vogl, for soprano, tenor, baritone and piano and a great piano duet composition, the Theme and Variations in A-flat major, D. 814.

“Emily Birsan will perform the ‘flower-ballad’ Viola, D. 786, and two Italian canzonas, D. 688 and the previously mentioned Epistle to Josef von Spaun. She will conclude the program with one of Schubert’s best-loved songs, Ellen’s 3rd Song from Scott’s The Lady of the Lake….also known as Ave Maria.”

“The concert will close with an audience singalong of ‘An die Musik.’

“We offer this program of musical collaboration in a spirit of camaraderie, good will, and love for Schubert and his music, in celebration of the composer’s 220th birthday on January 31. From Schubert’s Circle of Friends we reach out to our own Circle of Friends, including the sponsor of these Schubertiades: Ann Boyer.”

Tickets may be purchased online, at the Memorial Union Box Office or in Mills Hall, one hour before the concert.

Read this news story about our Schubertiade in 2015.