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WE’re Changing our format

A message from the Mead Witter School of Music:

After six years of using this WordPress blog as a newsletter platform, we are finally switching to a HTML format! I started this blog in 2013 before we created a new website, and I’ve waited a long time to make a change.

I’m grateful to the Division of Continuing Studies at UW-Madison for helping with this transition.

If you are a subscriber, your email has been moved to a new database.

The previously-published news on this blog will not go away, but this will be the final one. Future news and announcements will now be sent from a different address. It will be a work in progress for some time, I’m sure.

To receive our updated newsletter, sign up here.

Thank you for supporting the Mead Witter School of Music!

Kathy Esposito, publicist and concert manager

Opening Fall 2019! Stay tuned for announcement.

Watch our concerto winners on video; “Delta Blues” online this summer; “Just Bach” concerts in Madison; Vinyl records stage a comeback

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
www.music.wisc.edu/


Watch our concerto winners talk about the works they’ll play this Sunday at our annual Symphony Showcase

Musically, UW-Madison’s annual concerto competition ranges far and wide. This year, winners included a vocalist (Cayla Rosché, soprano, singing Strauss’s Vier Letzte Lieder, TrV 296); a violinist (Richard Silvers, performing Dvorak’s Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 53); a piano duo (Adalia Hernandez Abrego and Jiawen Zhang, playing Poulenc’s Concerto for Two Pianos in D minor); a composer (Anne McAninch, with the UW-Symphony Orchestra performing her new work, Fanfare for Orchestra); and a bassoonist (Chia-Yu Hsu, who will play Bitsch’s Concertino for Bassoon and Orchestra).

Watch here and join the fun, Sunday, March 10, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Tickets: $12 adults, children and students free, available at the Memorial Union, online and at the door. Learn more here.


New summer offering: “Delta Blues,” with Professor Charles Dill. Now offered online!

Registration begins April 1; check back soon for precise course number.
See course guide here.

This class, first offered by Professor Dill in spring 2017, will now be available online as a four-week summer course. In the class, Dill traces the history of the blues within America’s racial history, beginning with the living conditions that produced the blues in rural Mississippi, and detailing the emergence of blues in the early recording industry (Paramount, OKeh), including the earliest examples (W.C. Handy, Mamie Smith), as well as the singers emerging in the 1920s (Blind Lemon Jefferson, Charley Patton, Robert Johnson). The class then follows migrations northward to Memphis (jug bands) and Chicago (electric blues), traces the emerging importance of radio and live performance (King Biscuit Time, WDIA, the Chittlin’ Circuit) as well as living conditions in Chicago (Maxwell Street). It will track early marketing of blues to white audiences (Josh White, Lead Belly) and end with the reemergence of the blues as ’60s folk music. The course is supplemented with extensive musical selections and documentary footage of interviews and performances.

Mississippi Fred McDowell, 1960. Courtesy WikiCommons.


Musicians travel to Cuban sister city, Camaguey

A group of Madison musicians, including UW-Madison bass instructor Nick Moran, jazz studies director Johannes Wallmann and cellist Meredith Nesbitt traveled to Cuba in January. The American musicians played four concerts with Cuban musicians in addition to workshops and other opportunities.

Read story on Channel 3000.

“Just Bach” in Madison

Sarah Brailey

Doctoral voice candidate Sarah Brailey returned to Wisconsin last fall after ten years in New York City. “One of my favorite parts of my musical life in New York City was how much Bach I had the chance to sing. I regularly sang with the two big liturgical Bach series: Bach Vespers at Holy Trinity Lutheran and Bach at One at Trinity Wall Street. Last spring, just after I had decided I would return to Madison for my doctorate (I got my master’s  here in ’07) I ran into Madison violist, Marika Fischer Hoyt, who was in NYC and was attending a Bach at One concert in which I was soloing. We chatted after the concert about how I was coming back to Madison and wouldn’t it be great if there were a similar free, afternoon Bach series that regularly featured Bach’s wonderful and vast cantata repertoire. She got Paul Rowe and Cheryl Bensman-Rowe on board and the rest is history!”
Other Just Bach artistic staff include Cheryl Bensman-Rowe and Paul Rowe, founders of the Madison Early Music Festival; violist Marika Fischer Hoyt; organist Mark Brampton Smith; violinist and SOM alumna Kangwon Lee Kim; cellist and viola da gamba player James Waldo, a doctoral student at UW-Madison; UW-Madison doctoral tenor Wesley Dunnagan; cellist Anton TenWolde; and violinist Nathan Giglierano, a UW-Madison SOM alumnus.

Next “Just Bach” concert: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 1 PM
On the program:
BWV 4: Christ lag in Todesbanden
JM Bach: Herr, ich warte auf dein Heil
Luther Memorial Church, 1021 University Avenue, Madison

https://justbach.org/


Vinyl Grows in Popularity

From On Wisconsin magazine

“Staff members at Mills Music Library have noticed students’ growing interest in vinyl in recent years. Tom Caw, the music public services librarian, says staff and librarians across the country have reported an increase in people requesting, listening to, or checking out long-playing vinyl.

“ ‘I think part of the allure for the vinyl listening experience is that it’s a physical interaction with a device, and I think people are used to having access online to streaming media,’ ” Caw says. “ ’The interactive physical experience is something you can’t replicate online.’ ”

In case you had not heard, “Record Store Day” is April 13.


Upcoming events-Click links for details

Student-run opera: “The Old Maid and the Thief
Two performances – Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 9, 6:30 PM, Music Hall. Free.

Faculty Recital: Jessica Johnson, solo piano – Works of Female Composers
Friday, March 8 @ 8:00 pm PM, Mills Hall. Free.

Wind Fest with Milwaukee Symphony Guests
Saturday, March 9, Humanities.  Free event. Beginning at 1:30 PM, the afternoon will include master classes in flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon with MSO guests, followed by instrumental choir readings and chamber music master classes with members of the Wingra Wind Quintet, UW’s faculty quintet.
Final concert:
8:00 PM, Mills Hall. David Gillingham’s rarely performed Concerto for Wind Quintet and Wind Ensemble.
Guests:
Heather Zinninger Yarmel, assistant principal flute, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Katherine Young Steele, principal oboe, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
William Helmers, clarinet, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Catherine Chen, principal bassoon, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

The Journey of African-American Song with John Wesley Wright
Saturday, March 9 @ 8:00 PM, Morphy Hall. Free.
For this special event, John Wesley Wright will present a recital of a variety of African-American music including examples of calls and chants, children’s game songs, spirituals and ring shouts, hymns and gospels, civil rights era songs, and contemporary songs. During his three-day residency, he will also present a master class and workshop.

UW Jazz Orchestra
Monday, March 11, 7:30 PM, Memorial Union Play Circle. Free.

Faculty Recital: Julia Rottmayer, soprano and Martha Fischer, piano
March 12 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
Soprano Julia Rottmayer and pianist Martha Fischer present a concert featuring art songs from a mother and child’s perspective.

Wisconsin Brass Quintet
Thursday, March 14 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
Featuring student trumpeter Brighin Kane-Grade performing Simple (Leonard Bernstein and Aaron Copland, arranged by Daniel Schlosberg.
Other works include music of Bernstein, Isaac Albenez, and David Sampson.

Le Domaine Musical with Marc Vallon and friends
Friday, March 15 @ 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free.
A concert of rarely performed music, including a deeply moving piece by Luciano Berio, O King, written in 1968 after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr.


Our Full Concert Calendar includes recitals, students ensembles, and more

calendar


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

“Symphony Showcase” – Concerto Winners Solo with the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra

February 20, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
www.music.wisc.edu/

Once again, the School of Music features some of our top talent at Symphony Showcase, our annual concerto winners’ recital. Please join us!

Sunday, March 10 – 7:30 PM

Mills Hall, 455 N. Park Street

$12 adults, free to students/children, music majors, faculty and staff.
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

Winners of the 2018-2019 competition:

Adalia Hernandez Abrego, piano
Jiawen Zhang, piano
Poulenc – Concerto for Two Pianos in D minor

Chia-Yu Hsu, bassoon
Bitsch – Concertino for Bassoon and Orchestra

Anne McAninch, composition
World Premiere: Fanfare for Orchestra

Cayla Rosché, soprano
Strauss – Vier Letzte Lieder, TrV 296

Richard Silvers, violin
Dvorak – Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 53

Read biographies here.

Congratulations to the winners of the Irving Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Competition

A competition and recital sponsored by former UW-Madison Chancellor Irving Shain. Winners were announced on Feb. 12 and the winners’ recital was held on February 16.

2019 Winners:
Zachary Pulse, oboe, with Anna Siampani, piano
Chia-Yu Hsu, bassoon, with Kangwoo Jin, piano


Rocker Steven Miller to receive an honorary degree at May 10 Kohl Center commencement

Arriving at UW–Madison in 1961, Miller spent seven semesters as a comparative literature major, including a year abroad at the University of Copenhagen. He credits his time in Madison with sharpening his social conscience, further noting, “When I got there, they didn’t have any rock bands.” He created the Ardells and the Knightranes, bands that performed for local clubs and parties every Friday and Saturday night. Fellow students Gary Gerlach, Boz Scaggs and Ben Sidran were in those bands. Read more here.

In the Media:

“Pure Harbison”: UW-Madison’s Mead Witter School of Music celebrates the octogenarian composer

UW-Madison opera, theater programs venture ‘Into the Woods’ together

Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, Inc. has been granted $20,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts to support a premiere performance of Artemisia by UW-Madison faculty composer Laura Schwendinger, with libretto by Ginger Strand, The opera is based on the life and work of Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi. There will also be related community engagement programming. Artemisia will also be presented in New York City in early March at Trinity Church Wall Street and in early June in San Francisco at Z space. 


Our Full Concert Calendar includes recitals, students ensembles, and more

calendar


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Coming up soon: Harbison Viola Sonata; Music of Frigyes Hidas; Percussion Concert with Film, Flowerpots and Drums

February 12, 2019

A very busy two weeks for the Mead Witter School of Music!

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
https://www.music.wisc.edu/

This weekend: World Premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata with Sally Chisholm and pianist Timothy Lovelace

Sunday, February 17, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. $25. Buy tickets here.

Learn about the event here.

The concert includes solo performances by Chisholm and Lovelace and the full Pro Arte Quartet.

Read a recent Isthmus review of the Pro Arte Quartet.

On Sunday, Feb. 10, the Wisconsin State Journal published a story about the upcoming John Harbison events in Madison. Read the story here.


UW Wind Ensemble with soloist Midori Samson

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2:00 PM, Mills Hall.

With Scott Teeple, conductor and Cole Hairston and Ross Wolf, graduate conductors. This concert will be livestreamed. Check this page for updates: https://www.music.wisc.edu/video/

Midori Samson

Presenting doctoral bassoonist Midori Samson, winner of the inaugural Wind Ensemble Concerto Competition. Midori, student of Professor Marc Vallon and recipient of a Collins Fellowship at the school of music, has a secondary focus in social work. She holds roles as second bassoon in the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and principal bassoon in the Beloit-Janesville Symphony. She previously was a fellow in the Civic Orchestra of Chicago and has performed in several Chicago Symphony Orchestra family concerts, as well as with the Austin, Charleston, and New World Symphonies, the National Orchestral Institute, and the Pacific Music Festival. Midori holds degrees from The Juilliard School and the University of Texas at Austin.  Midori will perform the Concerto for Bassoon (1999) of Frigyes Hidas . Click to see full program.


UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, featuring works of composer Augusta Read Thomas

Thursday, February 14, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall – Free

Augusta Read Thomas

With Chad Hutchinson, conductor, and graduate conductors Michael Dolan and Ji Hyun Yim. Click to see full program.

Augusta Read Thomas will be in residence at UW-Madison for this concert. Join us for a master class with Ms. Thomas, Feb. 14, 2:00 to 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall.

Among her many accomplishments, Ms. Thomas founded the University of Chicago’s Center for Contemporary Composition: “a dynamic, collaborative, and interdisciplinary environment for the creation, performance and study of new music and for the advancement of the careers of emerging and established composers, performers, and scholars.” An influential teacher at Eastman, Northwestern, Tanglewood, and Aspen Music Festival, she is only the 16th person to be designated University Professor at the University of Chicago.  From 1997 through 2006, Thomas was Mead Composer-in-Residence with the Chicago Symphony, working with conductors Daniel Barenboim and Pierre Boulez.


UW-Western Percussion Ensemble with guest composer Elliot Cole and percussionist Peter Ferry

Wednesday, February 20, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

Ticketed – Children $7 – Adults $17. Buy tickets here; also sold at door.

Presenting a three-day residency by composer Elliot Cole and percussionist Peter Ferry, who will perform with the UW-Western Percussion Ensemble. Works on the program will include “The Future is Bright” for soloist, film, and percussion ensemble and “Hanuman’s Leap” for percussion group, digital playback, and voice. Learn more here.

Elliot Cole is a composer and “charismatic contemporary bard” (NY Times).  He has performed his music with Grammy winners Roomful of Teeth, Grammy nominees A Far Cry and Metropolis Ensemble, as well as the Chicago Composers Orchestra, New Vintage Baroque, the Lucerne Festival Academy, and as a member of the book-club-band Oracle Hysterical.  His percussion music has been performed by over 250 percussion ensembles all over the world.  In 2017 he was invited by Talks at Google to share his unique approach to music through computer programming.  He is on faculty at New York’s The New School and Juilliard’s Evening Division, and is program director of Musicambia at Sing Sing prison, where he works with a music school for incarcerated men.


University Opera and University Theatre: Sondheim’s Into the Woods

From February 21 through 24, University Theatre and University Opera, in partnership with the Wisconsin Union Theater, will co-present Into the Woods at Shannon Hall in the Memorial Union, marking the first time in twelve years that the Mead Witter School of Music and the Department of Theatre and Drama have collaborated on a production.  David Ronis, Karen K. Bishop director of opera, will direct, and Chad Hutchinson, orchestra director, will conduct.

Five performances are planned: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings at 7:30 PM, and Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.
Read about the show.
Buy tickets here.


Guest Artist: Rhea Olivaccé, soprano, with Martha Fischer, piano

The Black Voice – A Collection of African American Art Songs and Spirituals

Recital: Saturday, February 23, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall
Master class: February 22, 5:00 PM, Morphy Hall
Free and open to the public.
Read more. 


In New York: Laura Schwendinger’s Artemisia

March 5–9, 2019
Trinity Church Wall Street
St. Paul’s Chapel, Broadway and Fulton Street, New York City

The Time’s Arrow Festival continues its commitment to amplifying the voices of female artists across multiple mediums. The festival includes the fully staged world premiere of the new opera Artemisia by UW-Madison faculty composer Laura Schwendinger. Artemisia tells the story of the Baroque artist who portrayed herself as Susanna in her famous painting Susanna and the Elders.

Schwendinger’s “High Wire Act” praised in Boston

From the Boston Classical Review: “If one needed to be reminded that a program of contemporary music can be engaging – even riveting – on its own terms, Collage New Music’s concert’s Sunday night at Pickman Hall was the place to be. CNM music director David Hoose led a reading of High Wire Act that brimmed with personality. Sarah Brady’s realization of Schwendinger’s brilliant flute writing was particularly compelling: precise, nimble, and fiery.” Read the review here.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

UW alumni help launch strings education in Door County; pro arte in mills hall tomorrow; Christopher Taylor next weekend

February 1, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music


University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/


UW-Madison alumni form 3/4 of new strings education quartet in Door County

Executive director also an alumna

The first time UW-Madison’s Hunt Quartet played in Door County for Midsummer’s Music, a Door County summer chamber music festival, it was in response to an emergency.

The renowned Pro Arte Quartet had long been booked to play, but the quartet had to cancel. Midsummer’s artistic director James Berkenstock scrambled to fill the void.

The Griffon String Quartet. L-R: Roy Meyer, Ryan Louie, “Vini” Sant’Ana, and Blakeley Menghini. Photograph by Ben Menghini.

David Perry, violinist with the Pro Arte, had a solution: Hire the Hunt, the graduate string quartet at UW-Madison. “David said that this particular configuration of the Hunt Quartet was superb,” says Berkenstock. “He said they already had a program and would do a great job.”

Read the full story here.


Classical pianist Christopher Taylor continues his Liszt/Beethoven cycle

Franz Liszt was a superstar pianist. He was a virtuoso who invented the orchestral tone poem, taught 400 students for free, conducted and composed. Musicologist Alan Walker wrote three volumes about Liszt, shedding light on all of Liszt’s work but especially his genius for transcription. Writes Anthony Tommasini of the New York Times, “The best of these works are much more than virtuosic stunts. Liszt’s piano transcriptions of the nine Beethoven symphonies are works of genius. Vladimir Horowitz, in a 1988 interview, told me that he deeply regretted never having played Liszt’s arrangements of the Beethoven symphonies in public.”

Few pianists have tackled all nine Beethoven transcriptions. Christopher Taylor is one. On Saturday, February 9, at 8:00 PM in Mills Hall, Taylor will perform his sixth transcription – Beethoven’s 8th Symphony. Saturday’s concert will also include six preludes by Nikolai Kapustin, a whose works span both classical and jazz, and the Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (“Der Wanderer”) of Franz Schubert.

Christopher Taylor. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

In 2020, Christopher Taylor will celebrate Beethoven’s 250th anniversary with performances of the Franz Liszt transcriptions of Beethoven’s symphonies, in Madison and beyond. In Boston, Taylor will perform the entire set in five concerts at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Tickets for Taylor’s Feb. 9 concert ($17 adults, $7 children) may be purchased online or in person.

Purchase options here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

Or, purchase online directly at this link.


Pro Arte Quartet this Saturday

February 2 @ 8:00 pm, Mills Concert Hall, 455 N. Park St.

Program: String Quartet D Major, Op. 50 No. 6 “The Frog”(1796) – Franz Joseph Haydn String Quartet No. 9 in Eb Major, Op. 117 (1964) – Dmitri Shostakovich String Quartet in A Major, Op. 41 No. 3 (1842) – Robert Schumann


“Schubertiade” charms audience once again

Isthmus’s John Barker wrote, “A carefully prepared program and a multi-page handout with the full German song texts, with English translations, allowed the audience to become fully immersed in the music.

“And what absolutely wonderful music!”

Check our Facebook page for images from the January 27 concert.

The Perlman Trio following their performance of Schubert’s Piano Trio No. 2, second movement: Mercedes Cullen, Kanwoo Jin, and Micah Cheng. With Bill Lutes at piano. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Upcoming Concerts

Jazz Composers Group and Afro-Cuban Jazz Ensemble  February 1 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Tandem Press, 1743 Commercial Avenue 
Wingra Wind Quintet in Richland Center February 3 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 26625 Crestview Dr Richland Center, WI  Members of the Wingra Wind Quintet in concert, presented by the Richland Concert Association at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Richland Center.
UW Jazz Orchestra & the Billy Childs Quartet February 9 @ 8:00 pm Memorial Union-Shannon Hall, 800 Langdon Street WI  Jazz pianist Billy Childs, the 2018 Grammy Award winner for Best Jazz Instrumental Album, will join the UW Jazz Orchestra on stage for an exciting opening act prior to his appearance with the Billy Childs Quartet.
UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, with composer Augusta Read Thomas February 14 @ 7:30 pm Mills Concert Hall. With Chad Hutchinson, conductor, and graduate conductors Michael Dolan and Ji Hyun Yim.  Program: Jean Sibelius- Valse Triste; Augusta Read Thomas- Of Paradise and Light; Augusta Read Thomas- Prayer and Celebration; Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart- Symphony No. 39 in Eb. Major, K. 543. Augusta Read Thomas will be in residence at UW-Madison for this concert. Join us for a master class with Ms. Thomas, Feb. 14, 2:00 to 5:00 PM, Music Hall. 

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

University Opera and Theatre present Sondheim musical, “Into The Woods”

Be careful what you wish for!

Freudian psychology meets musical theater in Sondheim’s Into the Woods

University Theatre and University Opera join to present Stephen Sondheim’s classic mashup

January 23, 2019

Cinderella wants to go to the ball; Jack wants to climb the beanstalk; Little Red Riding Hood wants to take some goodies to her grandmother; Rapunzel is stuck in a tower. Add to these popular fairy tales one more about a baker, his wife, and the witch next door, weave them all together, and you have the ingenious mashup otherwise known as Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Into the Woods.

From February 21st through 24th, 2019, University Theatre and University Opera, in partnership with the Wisconsin Union Theater, will co-present Into the Woods at Shannon Hall in the Memorial Union, marking the first time in twelve years that the Mead Witter School of Music and the Department of Theatre and Drama have collaborated on a production. David Ronis, Karen K. Bishop director of opera, will direct, and Chad Hutchinson, orchestra director, will conduct.

Five performances are planned: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings at 7:30 PM, and Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.

Buy tickets here.

Into the Woods costume design for Granny and the Baker’s Wife, by Ashley Bellet.

The production will feature 20 singer-actors on stage, supported by over 70 instrumentalists, stage crew, and theater artisans from the School of Music, Department of Theatre and Drama, Department of Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, and from the campus-at-large, accompanied by the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra.

The timing of this presentation, two weeks after Madison Opera’s production of Sondheim’s A Little Night Music, could not be better for all lovers of musical theater and particularly the work of Stephen Sondheim. The opportunity to see two fully-realized, productions of Sondheim’s major works in such a short time will certainly make February 2019 “Sondheim Month” in Madison.

Into the Woods is a story of interconnected fairy tales where familiar characters venture into the woods to fulfill their deepest wishes. Half way through, it appears that all are succeeding and will live “happily ever after” until the real consequences of the characters’ actions come back to haunt them – and they do with a vengeance. Ultimately, each finds resolution and comfort in community, but only after sacrifices are made and difficult lessons are learned.

Into the Woods is chock full of memorable, urbane, often funny, beautiful songs – indeed many of Sondheim’s best – including Cinderella’s “On the Steps of the Palace,” Jack’s “Giant’s in the Sky,” the ironic duet, “Agony,” sung by the two Princes, the Witch’s heartfelt “Stay With Me,” and finally, the show’s moving anthem “No One is Alone.”

This elaborate production will feature the work of two student designers. M.F.A. scenic design student John Drescher, assisted by Ariana White, Jake Prine, and Emma Bruland, have crafted an imaginative set that incorporates projections and involves many moving parts. Senior Ethan White serves as sound designer, assisted by Isabel Coff, sound engineer. They are joined by professionals: costume designer Ashley Bellet, lighting designer Kenneth Ferencek, and props designer Lydia Berggruen. Completing the production team will be production stage manager Jahana Azodi, technical director Greg Silver, scene shop head Rob Wagner, assistant directors Benjamin Hopkins and Thomas Kasdorf, and assistant stage managers Molly Jean Frisch and Dylan Thoren. Additional production support is provided by scenic charge Emily Rudolf, lighting board operator Hope Robiolio, and master electrician Alice Combs.

The majority of performers on stage will be undergraduate students. Miranda Kettlewell and Elisheva Pront will split performances as Cinderella; Zoe Bockhorst and Meghan Stecker will share performances of Little Red Riding Hood; Talia Engstrom and Emily Vandenberg will both perform the role of the Baker’s Wife; Bryanna Plaisir will take the role of the Witch; Michael Kelley will be the Baker; and Christian Brenny will perform the role of Jack. The Princes will be Benjamin Galvin (Cinderella’s Prince) and Tanner Zocher (Rapunzel’s Prince) and the Wolf/Steward will be played by Cobi Tappa. Cinderella’s adopted family will be portrayed by Faith Fuller (Stepmother), Josie Brandmeier (Florinda), Shasparay Lighteard (Lucinda) and Zach Wolff (Cinderella’s Father). The triple assignment of Cinderella’s Mother, Granny, and the Giant will be fulfilled by Angela Peterson. Master’s student Kelsey Wang will be Rapunzel. Doctoral candidates Quanda Johnson and Joshua Kelly will play the roles of Jack’s Mother and the Narrator/Mysterious Man respectively. Besides Maestro Hutchinson, the musical team will consist of Mead Witter vocal coach Dr. Daniel Fung, doctoral candidate Thomas Kasdorf (musical preparation), and Wade Troyer (rehearsal pianist). In addition, doctoral student Michael Dolan will serve as assistant conductor and conduct one performance.

Buy tickets here.

University Opera is a cultural service of the Mead Witter School of Music at the University of Wisconsin-Madison whose mission is to provide comprehensive operatic training and performance opportunities for our students and operatic programming to the community. For more information, please contact opera@music.wisc.edu. Or visit the School of Music’s web site at music.wisc.edu.

 

Famed scholar to illumine Schubert history; New strings scholarship created; Medical Orchestra offers musical balm

January 15, 2019

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706

http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Welcome to a New Year!

We hope that everyone enjoyed a safe and pleasant holiday season!

Send your news

Note to Alumni: The Hamel Music Center will open this fall, and we’d like to round up as many alumni stories as possible to include in various formats. Stories may include current occupations, research projects, performances and family information! Please send your updates to this email address.


Medical Orchestra soothes performers as much as patrons

On December 3, the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health presented an inaugural concert of the Medical Orchestra of Wisconsin, performing works by Dvorak, Sibelius, and Schubert.  The orchestra is composed of the school’s medical students, graduate students, faculty, and staff, and was conducted by School of Music graduate conducting assistants Jenny Yim and Michael Dolan (pictured, at the podium). The orchestra’s next concert is planned for April 14 in Mills Hall.


Renowned Schubert scholar Susan Youens to present at annual Schubertiade

Susan Youens, recently retired from the University of Notre Dame, has one of the most impressive musicology resumes in the world, and she’ll visit on January 27 to tell us a story or two about Franz Schubert. Youens has won four fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. She’s written eight books, hundreds of articles, essays and chapters, and lectured all over the world.

“Dr. Youens will explore the rich relationship of Schubert’s music to the poems he chose to set and the emergence of new directions in Schubert’s style,” says co-organizer William Lutes.  “The influence of Beethoven had loomed large throughout Schubert’s music, and in the year following Beethoven’s death, the 31-year-old composer wrote works of homage to this great master, as he saw his own music becoming more widely recognized, published and performed.”

Highlights of our Schubertiade  will be a complete performance of Schubert’s 14 final songs, published after his death as Schwanengesang, or “Swan Songs” – among the composer’s richest and most forward looking works; the humorous and risqué Refrain-Lieder, the slow movement of the great Piano Trio in E-flat major, the enchanting Rondo in A major for piano four-hands; and the beautiful song Auf den Strom for voice, horn and piano, composed for a concert commemorating the first anniversary of Beethoven’s death, and filled with subtly haunting references to Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony.

Our Mills Hall living room, Schubertiade 2014. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

In addition to pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes, our guests will include voice faculty members Mimmi Fulmer, Julia Rottmayer and Paul Rowe, voice students Sarah Brailey, Wesley Dunnagan, and Benjamin Hopkins, graduate hornist Joanna Schultz, and guest singer Cheryl Bensman-Rowe. We are also pleased to present the Perlman Trio (Mercedes Cullen, violin; Micah Cheng, cello; Kangwoo Jin, piano).

We thank our generous donors Ann Boyer and Kato Perlman for their longtime support of our Schubertiades, the Perlman Trio, and other musicians and events.

2019 SCHUBERTIADE SCHEDULE:

Master class with Susan Youens. Thursday, January 24, 4:30 PM, Morphy Hall. (Free)
Pre-concert lecture: 2:00 PM, Sunday, January 27, Morphy Hall. (Free.)
Concert: 3:00 PM, Sunday, January 27, Mills Hall. (Buy tickets here.)
Post-concert reception, included with ticket purchase: Sunday, January 27, University Club, 5:30 PM.

TICKETS: $17 adults, $7 all age students/children. Free to music majors, faculty and staff. To avoid long lines, we suggest arriving 30 minutes early or buying tickets ahead of time, either in person or online. Please see link below.

Purchase options (online, by telephone and in person) here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

To buy tickets directly online, click here.


Announcing The Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship Fund

This new scholarship was created with a generous gift from Dr. Stanley and Mrs. Shirley Inhorn. The fund supports graduate and undergraduate students who study string performance at the Mead Witter School of Music at UW-Madison. Susan C. Cook, director of the School of Music, expressed her thanks to the Inhorns. “Stan and Shirley Inhorn have been great and generous friends to the Madison music community. Their ongoing support of the Mead Witter School of Music will ensure that our wonderful students can realize their musical dreams.”

To make an online gift to the Dr. Stanley and Shirley Inhorn Strings Scholarship Fund, visit supportuw.org/giveto/StringsScholarship (or click the image above).

To make a gift by mail, please make your check payable to the University of Wisconsin Foundation and note the fund name in the memo line. Send your check to University of Wisconsin Foundation, US Bank Lockbox, Box 78808, Milwaukee, WI 53278-0807.

The Inhorns will be formally recognized at a concert on February 17, featuring the world premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata, performed by the Pro Arte Quartet’s Sally Chisholm and Minneapolis pianist Timothy Lovelace. The full Pro Arte Quartet will also perform.

Sally Chisholm

Read about the Inhorns and this concert.

TICKETS:  Buy tickets ($25) to the world premiere of John Harbison’s Viola Sonata, with Pro Arte violist Sally Chisholm and Minneapolis pianist Timothy Lovelace. The full Pro Arte Quartet will also perform.


Christopher Taylor to perform Liszt, Schubert and Kapustin on February 9

Christopher Taylor. Image by Michael R. Anderson.

Faculty pianist Christopher Taylor, a 1993 bronze medal winner in the Van Cliburn competition, will perform Franz Liszt’s transcription of Beethoven’s Symphony no. 8 in F Major, op. 93. This will be the sixth Lizst transcription of Beethoven’s symphonies that Taylor has performed. Also on the program: Six of Nikolai Kapustin’s 24 Preludes and the Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (“Der Wanderer”) of Franz Schubert.

Following Taylor’s 2017 performance of Liszt’s arrangement of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony plus two other works, musicologist Mark DeVoto wrote this in the Boston Musical Intelligencer: “No other piano recital I’ve heard in the past three years has equaled this one for it combination of excitement, interest, and emotion. I hope Taylor will return early and often with whatever conventional or unconventional repertoire he wishes.”

DeVoto’s wish has come true: Later this year, Taylor will perform the entire Liszt-Beethoven cycle at the Isabella Gardiner Museum in Boston.

Taylor also recently performed in Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Remembering Lenny” program of mid-November.

TICKETS:  $17 adults, $7 all age students/children. Free to music majors, faculty and staff. To avoid long lines, we suggest arriving 30 minutes early or buying tickets ahead of time, either in person or online. Please see link below.

Purchase options (online, by telephone and in person) here:
https://www.music.wisc.edu/about-us/tickets/

To buy tickets directly online, click here.


Award Announcements: Jazz Studies Professor Johannes Wallmann and graduate pianist Anna Siampani

UW-Madison’s Division of the Arts provides annual awards for arts achievements and future endeavors. This year, the School of Music is represented twice. Johannes Wallmann, director of jazz studies & associate professor of music, received the Emily Mead Baldwin Award in the Creative Arts. Anna Siampani, graduate pianist studying with Professor Jessica Johnson, received the David and Edith Sinaiko Frank Graduate Fellowship for a Woman in the Arts.

Pianist Anna Siampani

Siampani, a native of Veria, Greece, will use the project award to finance her dissertation research. That project includes first-ever primary source research into the solo piano works of Manolis Kalomiris, a composer born in Smyrna, Greece in 1883, who died in 1962. Kalomiris is seen as the father of modern Greek music. This April, Anna will present two events, a lecture and a recital delving into these works, “demonstrating the characteristic Greek idiom with the complexity and inflection of the folk rhythms, the varying touches of articulation and the flowing pacing of the performance practices. She’ll follow up with a CD recording and accompanying booklet containing analysis of the works.

Over the holiday break, Anna returned to Greece to dig into the libraries at the Manolis Kalomiris Society, The National Conservatory, National Library of Greece, and the Lilian Voudouri Music Library of Greece.


Upcoming concert highlights at the School of Music

Double Reed Fest
Saturday, January 19, beginning 1:30 PM in Mills Hall. Hosted by UW-Madison faculty Andreas Oeste, oboe and Marc Vallon, bassoon, the Double Reed Fest brings together oboists and bassoonists of all ages and abilities in a festive celebration of their instruments.

The Panama Papers: Tom Curry, tuba; Mark Hetzler, trombone; and Anthony DiSanza, percussion
Saturday, January 26, 8:00 PM, Mills Hall. Free.

Schubertiade with Martha Fischer, Bill Lutes and Schubert scholar Susan Youens (See above.)
Sunday, January 27, 2:00 PM (lecture), 3:00 PM (concert). $7 – $17.

Spring 2019 Carillon Concerts with Lyle Anderson. Observatory Drive.
All concerts are Sundays at 3:00 PM.
January 13 & 27; February 10 & 24; March 10 & 24; April 14 & 28; May 12 & 26.

Decoda Interactive Performance Residency
Final concert: Thursday, January 31, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.
Decoda is a collective of versatile artists dedicated to creating dynamic performances and creative programs designed for social impact. Decoda’s pursuits place equal emphasis on artistry and engagement to create meaningful musical experiences around the globe through concerts in major international venues and neighborhood projects with vibrant community partners.

7th Wisconsin Summit for Band Conductors
Friday, February 1 @ 7:00 AM – 12:00 PM.
A workshop featuring internationally renowned clinicians focused on self-improvement for the middle and high school band directors. Hosted by Scott Teeple, professor, conductor of Wind Ensemble.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

All eyes on Mike (Leckrone); Grad oboist joins Stuart Flack for final show (with cellphones!); Presenting bassoonist Midori Samson, competition winner

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Coming next week!
Choral Union – The Kodály Te Deum and The Duruflé Requiem – Ticketed
TWO DATES: Saturday, December 8, 2018, 8 PM, and Sunday, December 9, 7:30 PM.
Beverly Taylor, conductor.    Buy tickets here.

The Zoltan Kodaly Te Deum is a song of praise to God that ends with the words “Let me never be confounded.” Written in 1937, the work is about 20 minutes long and is wonderful for its many moods and styles in a short amount of time.The music begins heroically, grows quiet, turns slow and majestic, then darkly moody as the soloists sing long lines over chanted lines in the chorus. This middle section draws on Hungarian folktunes for its unusual scales. From this quiet, the music grows faster and stronger and breaks into a joyous fugue. Not to end there, the mood changes to quiet, with the chorus and soprano soloist singing unaccompanied by anyone except string basses and a few wind instruments.

The Duruflé Requiem by the French organist and composer Maurice Duruflé bears many things in common with the Fauré Requiem, in that the style is often flowing, chant-like (it is based on Gregorian chant), and with the warmth of late French Romanticism. Unlike the Fauré Duruflé orchestrated the work for full orchestra with wind instruments replacing the organ in the original (performed several years ago by my colleague Bruce Gladstone in Luther Memorial Church.) This colorful full version is performed for the first time at the UW-Madison, and will feature baritone soloist Michael Johnson and mezzo soloist Chloe Flesch. – Beverly Taylor.


All eyes on Mike:  Mike Leckrone’s final Camp Randall game as marching band conductor

Former drummer Meg Jones, a longtime reporter for the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, was a fitting choice to write this farewell story about Mike.  “Before Leckrone there was no Fifth Quarter, no chicken dance, no “Theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey”  repurposed with the team’s fight song as “Space Badgers.” No one sticking around after football games. No one shouting, ‘ When you say Wis-con-sin … you’ve said it all!’  In a way, the man has single-handedly changed football Saturdays in Madison.”

Photograph credits:  UW Communications.

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Did you know…. that members of the UW Marching Band are expected on the field at 7:00 AM, no matter what the weather?

From the Wisconsin State Journal: “Since his first day — Sept. 1, 1969 — six chancellors and two acting chancellors have come and gone. He’s on his ninth football coach and directed halftime shows for 50 of Camp Randall’s 101 years.” Read more in The final march: Mike Leckrone’s 50 years directing at UW-Madison football games nears end

Mike on Channel 3 News

“It’s something I love doing and I don’t want to necessarily leave it, but I think it’s probably time,” Leckrone said. “I think that 50 year benchmark, that helped me to get going.”  Watch TV interview here.


Bassoonist Midori Samson wins inaugural Wind Ensemble competition

Concert Sunday, February 17, 2:00 PM, Mills Hall

Midori Samson

Bassoonist Midori Samson, winner of the first Wind Ensemble Concerto Competition, will perform the Concerto for Bassoon by Frigyes Hidas with the UW-Madison Wind Ensemble in February as the winner of the first Wind Ensemble Concerto Competition.  Midori studies with Professsor Marc Vallon and is a Collins Fellow, performs locally with Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and Beloit-Janesville Symphony, and holds degrees from The Juilliard School and the University of Texas at Austin. Read more here.


Oboist Zachary Pulse joins interdisciplinary artist Stuart Flack for December 8 performance, capping a semester-long class

Graduate oboist Zach Pulse will be one of many performers in the capstone event of Stuart Flack’s residency, titled “Data Vaudevilles: Bits and Bytes.”  Flack is a playwright, producer, social entrepreneur, and policy researcher who explores incorporating complex data into live performance. Pulse studies with oboist Andreas Oeste.

Performance: Saturday, December 8, 2:00 PM, H.F. DeLuca Forum at the Discovery Building (330 N. Orchard Street, Madison) .

Zachary Pulse

“I decided to take this class to explore more interdisciplinary connections outside of my own field – especially while studying at an incredible research institution like UW-Madison. I was also drawn to Stuart Flack’s work specifically, as a creative producer, and performer of information sets. Outside of music, I have always been drawn to geography, maps, and how the concept of place defines the work we do, so I spent this semester exploring ways to turn geographic data into performance.

“My work, This Land is Your Land,  examines land usage in the United States. This complex, multi-layered set of information can be difficult to wrap one’s mind around, so I am curating a soundscape as an alternative way to process these numbers. This acoustic environment will be crafted both from pre-recorded media and live performance via the cell phone speakers of everyone present in the room (participation willing!). I have also collaborated with several of my colleagues in this class on their projects, and will take part in performances about segregation in Chicago, the U.S./Mexican border, and garbage distribution in China, among others. If any of these topics appeal to you, or if you’re curious to experience 665 cows moo-ing in surround sound, I highly recommend this one-of-a-kind concert experience!”


Pianist and partner win Ohio International Piano Duet and Duo Competition, artist division

Eric Tran

Eric Tran, a pianist in the studio of Professor Christopher Taylor, along with his piano partner Nathan Cheung, have won another piano duet competition, the Ohio International Piano Duet and Duo Competition. Their duo, Happy Dog Duo, has performed four-hands and two-piano repertoire together since they were in middle school. They won both first prize and the Abild American Music Award at the 2017 Ellis Duo-Piano Competition, hosted by the National Federation of Music Clubs. Recently, Happy Dog Duo was awarded first prize in the inaugural MTNA-Stecher and Horowitz Two Piano Competition 2018. Read more.


More end of semester highlights at the School of Music

Please click links to learn more and buy tickets. Check site for student recitals.

Guest Artist Master Class: Melinda Wagner, composer – Free
Friday, November 30, 11:45 AM, Morphy Hall.

UW-Madison/Metropolitan School District Jazz Fest Concert with guest trombonist Dave Stamps – Free
Saturday, December 1, 6:00 PM, Music Hall.

All-University Strings – Free
Two non-major orchestras.
Saturday, December 1, 4:00 PM, Mills Hall.

Guest Artists: Nicholas Photinos, cello and Cipher Duo (voice and violin) – Free
Sunday, December 2, 8:00 PM, Morphy Hall.

Two Winter Concerts at Luther Memorial Church – Good will offering appreciated
An annual holiday affair with six UW-Madison choirs. conducted by graduate conductors and Professor Beverly Taylor.
Sunday, December 2, 2:00 and 4:00 PM. 1021 University Avenue.

Faculty Recital: Timothy Hagen, flute and Martha Fischer, piano – Free
Saturday, December 8, 3:00 PM, Mills Hall.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Mimmi Fulmer, then and now; Livestreaming Update; Faculty Searches; Science & Music; Meet a Student

November 14, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Faculty searches in progress

The School of Music is now searching for qualified candidates for three professorships, one in music education (submit by Nov. 30); one in trumpet (submit by Dec. 7); and one in conducting (submit by Dec. 7). Visit Jobs@UW-Madison for full information.


Name-a-seat campaign enters final stretch!

Our seat-naming campaign for the  Hamel Music Center is in the final stretch; the deadline is December 31! We’ve received a wonderful response so far, and invite other supporters of music education, performance and scholarship at UW-Madison to join us. Click here to learn more.


Professor Mimmi Fulmer, then and now

Performing in Monteverdi’s Coronation of Poppea, 1989 and 2018

Prof. Mimmi Fulmer as Poppea and tenor Gregory Schmidt as Nerone, in 1989’s “Coronation of Poppea.” Image courtesy UW Archives.

Our recent Facebook post of Voice Professor Mimmi Fulmer performing as Poppea in University Opera’s 1989 version of “The Coronation of Poppea” by Monteverdi garnered many fond comments from alumni and students. Prof. Fulmer will also appear in this weekend’s production, this time as Nutrice. In 1989, the part of Nerone was acted and sung by tenor Gregory Schmidt, now a member of the Metropolitan Opera. To read all the comments, visit (and join!) our Facebook page.

The current production of “Poppea,” directed by David Ronis and conducted by Chad Hutchinson, starts this Friday. Read more and buy tickets here.


“Artemisia” in New York City

Last weekend’s production of Artemisia, the new opera by faculty composer Laura Schwendinger, featured Augusta Casso as the Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi and Daniel Foltz-Morrison as Augustino Tassi. Image by Leni Schwendinger.

Last weekend, the Center for Contemporary Opera at Symphony Space in New York City presented Professor Laura Schwendinger’s Artemisia, about the life of the great baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi. Artemisia will receive five performances this year, three in New York and two in San Francisco.


Watch concerts from the comfort of your couch!

School of Music to livestream two concerts this week

Music ed major Rebecca Compton-Allen tunes water glasses used in “blue cathedral” by composer Jennifer Higdon. UW-Madison Symphony, Thursday, Nov. 15. Image by Katherine Esposito.

Of course, we want you in our audiences, but if you can’t attend, please bookmark this link and check in one hour prior to concert start. (You can even set reminders!)

UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, Thursday, Nov. 15, 8:00 PM, Mills Hall.
Click for program.

UW Concert Choir
Saturday, November 17, 8:00 PM, Mills Hall.
Click for program.


Young wind players, take note: Wind Ensemble and Winds of Wisconsin to hold joint concert of Bernstein works

Every year, the high school ensemble Winds of Wisconsin plans a joint concert with our college wind players in the Wind Ensemble. Both groups are conducted by Professor Scott Teeple. This year’s program, Sunday, Nov. 18 at 7:00 PM, is devoted to the music of Leonard Bernstein.

Prof. Scott Teeple conducting the high school group, Winds of Wisconsin. Image by Michael R. Anderson.


Meet a Student: Nicole Carrion Vaughn

Nicole is a flutist and a woodwind graduate assistant with the UW Marching Band, where she assist students learning drill for pregame and halftime, teaches music during sectionals, conducts on the field during pregame and halftime, and accompanies the band on away trips. She grew up in Alabama and transferred to UW-Madison last year.

Nicole Vaughn

“Going into middle school, I knew I wanted to be in the band, but I never wanted to be a flute player – I wanted to be a percussionist. My grandmother, on the other hand, didn’t want me making a ton of noise at home. So then I decided that I wanted to play the French horn, but my grandmother didn’t want drips on the floor.

“She asked me if I wanted to play the flute, and I quickly said no. But then she gave me an ultimatum: to play the flute or I couldn’t be in band. I didn’t have much of a choice!”
Read more about Nicole here.


Geoscience professor experiments with live music as way to convey science concepts

Stephen Meyers, Vilas Distinguished Professor of Geoscience, has been collaborating with faculty trombonist and Professor Mark Hetzler and his band, “Mr. Chair,” using music to convey scientific concepts to general geology students. “The result was Beginnings, a lecture in four acts: Expansion, Contraction, Catastrophe, and At Time’s Horizon. In Expansion, Meyers showed a video clip of Hetzler playing his trombone from the passenger seat of a car driving past a stationary camera. The changes in Hetzler’s B-flat note illustrated how the Doppler effect works – a sound coming toward you is always higher pitched than a sound moving away from you.” Meyers will repeat the class this semester, and also plans a second lecture-with-music, called “The Deep Groove.” Read the full story and watch a video from University Communications.


Additional fall concerts:

Please check our events website to view these and additional events, including student recitals.
Low Brass Ensemble
November 17 @ 4:00 pm – Free
UW-Madison Low Brass Ensemble features students from the trombone and tuba/euphonium studios. Tom Curry and Mark Hetzler, directors.

Fall Carillon Concert
November 25 @ 3:00 pm – Free
Performed by Lyle Anderson, carilloneur.

Opera Scenes – Fall
November 27 @ 7:30 pm- Free
Students in the UW-Madison Opera Workshop class perform a variety of scenes from opera and musical theatre, staged and with piano accompaniment.

Guest Artist Master Class: Melinda Wagner, composer
November 30 @ 11:45 am – 1:00 pm – Free
Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Melinda Wagner will discuss her music in a master class, open to students and the public.

Jazz Standards Ensemble and Contemporary Jazz Ensemble
November 30 @ 8:00 pm – Free
Featuring John Schaffer and Jonathan Greenstein, directors, with special guest, trombonist Dave Stamps.

UW-Madison/Metropolitan School District Jazz Fest Concert with guest trombonist Dave Stamps
December 1 @ 6:00 pm – Free
The UW-MMSD Jazz Festival will feature a three-day residency with Dave Stamps, director of jazz studies and assistant professor of music at Gustavus Adolphus College in Minnesota.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Trouble in First Century Rome; Meet Katie Anderson, soprano; Livestreaming this fall; Faculty News

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Student Focus: Waupaca native Katie Anderson, master’s candidate, voice

Katie performed as Musetta in last spring’s production of Puccini’s La bohème,  as the Governess in Britten’s The Turn of the Screw (spring 2017), and sang the national anthem at spring 2018 commencement at Camp Randall Stadium.

What drew you to this area of study? I’ve always loved singing. My parents were singers, and my grandmother loved opera. I explored opera and art song in college and found there was nothing I loved more than singing and being on stage.

Katie Anderson at UW-Madison’s spring 2018 commencement, singing the National Anthem. Photograph by Bryce Richter.

What colleges did you previously attend, and what are your degrees?    University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, bachelor’s degree in vocal performance, now finishing my master’s degree in vocal performance at UW-Madison.

What classes are you enrolled in? Are you taking lessons, and with whom? I am taking one last music history course before I graduate. During my time here, I have studied voice under Professor Mimmi Fulmer.

Give us a fun fact or two about yourself. I played the clarinet from 6th grade and continued into my undergrad. I also teach private voice in the Madison area.

Why did you choose UW-Madison? I felt welcomed to this campus, and I knew I had found a great teacher when I met Prof. Fulmer. I was given many performance opportunities, as well as a teaching assistantship and scholarship. Everything made sense to choose UW-Madison.

Do you have a particular goal this year? My goal this year is to keep finding opportunities to perform, and to prepare auditions for Young Artist Programs.


Livestream Concert Alert!  UW-Madison Symphony and Concert Choir

Thursday, November 15, 7:30 PM: UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra with conductor Chad Hutchinson and graduate conductor Michael Dolan. On the program: Blue Cathedral by Jennifer Higdon and Symphony No. 5 in e minor by Tchaikovsky.

Saturday, November 17, 2018, 8:00 PM: UW Concert Choir, with conductor Beverly Taylor and graduate conductor Michael Johnson. On the program: Hymn to St. Cecilia (Benjamin Britten); The Lamentations of Jeremiah (Alberto Ginastera); and more.

Check back for livestreaming details. Watch earlier videos on our YouTube channel.


If you thought you had problems, try living in 1st century Rome

That’s the conclusion of Thomas Aláan, who shares the role of Nero in University Opera’s upcoming performance of The Coronation of Poppea, written by Claudio Monteverdi. The show is loosely based on the historical marriage of the brutal Roman emperor Nero to the manipulative Poppea, the banishment of his wife Ottavia, the forced suicide of Seneca, and the attempted murder of Nero by Poppea’s former lover, Ottone and his new partner in crime, Drusilla. Ouch.

Bust of Nero at the Capitoline Museum, Rome.

Both Thomas and Benjamin Hopkins, his alter-Nero, wrote a few words about the opera and the painstaking work that goes into their roles. Says Thomas: “Learning the music is like the kitchen prep before you actually start cooking the meal. First, I pull out my cutting boards (I print the music) and I break out my cookbook (translate the text from Italian to English). Then, I cut up all the vegetables and other ingredients (I break down the music into its basic components — rhythms, notes, and language — and practice those individually and in combination). Finally, I try to familiarize myself with the cooking instructions so I can start cooking (I memorize all the music).”  Read the full interview here.

Benjamin Hopkins

Thomas Aláan



Artemisia to receive five performances in 2019-2020

Faculty composer Laura Elise Schwendinger‘s opera Artemisia, about the life of the great baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi, will receive five performances this year, three in New York and two in San Francisco. The opera tackles Gentileschi’s struggles and triumphs as she battles inequality and reveals hidden stories.

The first of these performances will occur Nov. 3, 2018 at Symphony Space, Thalia Theater in New York City, by the Center for Contemporary Opera, with an all-star cast featuring Augusta Caso, mezzo soprano, as Artemisia Gentileschi.

Then in March, the award-winning Trinity Wall Street Novus will present a partly staged production of Artemisia. Trinity’s Time’s Arrow Festival, taking place this season from March 5-9, 2019, is conceived as a unique combination of Baroque and contemporary works united by a common theme. The performances by Trinity Wall Street were featured in the New York Times Fall Preview.

In June, the award-winning Left Coast Ensemble will present the fully staged chamber music version of Artemisia. They will focus on the art and milieu of Gentileschi as well as Depression era photographer Dorothea Lange, in two chamber operas with projected images that come to life.
More at https://www.lauraschwendinger.com/artemisia


Johannes Wallmann releases new quintet album, Day and Night

In November 2018, Mead Witter faculty pianist-composer Johannes Wallmann will release a new quintet album, Day and Night, on Shifting Paradigm Records. Grammy-award winning trumpeter Brian Lynch, saxophonist Dayna Stephens, bassist Matt Pavolka, and rising star drummer Colin Stranahan join Wallmann for a collection of original compositions and re-imagined jazz standards. The CD may be pre-ordered now.

With this quintet, Wallmann revisits musical connections established over more than two decades in the jazz world. Day and Night is Wallmann’s eighth album as a leader, but the first to focus as extensively on his interpretations of the standard jazz repertoire. Wallmann has previously recorded seven critically acclaimed albums as a leader, including The Johannes Wallmann Quartet (1997), Alphabeticity (2003), Minor Prophets (2007), The Coasts (2010) and Always Something (2015). His 2015 quintet album, The Town Musicians, was named an Editors’ Pick by DownBeat Magazine.

Read these and other stories on our Faculty News Page


Veteran jazz pianist and UW alumnus Ben Sidran donates personal archives to Mills Music Library

Talk about a sweet sound. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries are excited to announce the recent acquisition of Ben Sidran’s extensive personal archives. The nearly 100 boxes of materials include everything from personal and professional correspondence, music manuscripts and drafts of song lyrics, master tapes, unedited radio interviews, and photographs and posters. Sidran is a 1967 UW-Madison alumnus and longtime city resident.

“We are delighted to welcome Ben Sidran’s collection into the UW-Madison Libraries,” said Jeanette Casey, director of Mills Music Library. “This a fabulous addition to the Wisconsin Music Archive. Ben’s materials also open an amazing door of potential when it comes to research and performance studies. His success and dedication to music bring entertainment and educational power.” –
UW-Madison Libraries



Last but not least: The Mead Witter School of Music Board of Advisors met last week and received a tour of the Hamel Music Center. Front row, L-R: JoAnne Krause, Martha Casey, Jun Lee, Sandy Lee, Chun Lin, Pamela Hamel, and Diane Ballweg. Back row, L-R: Director Susan C. Cook, Kathy Harker, Linda Graebner, Bob Graebner, Peter Lundberg, and Assistant Director Benjamin Schultz-Burkel. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.


Selected upcoming concerts:

UW Concert Band – Fall Concert
TONIGHT! October 24 @ 7:30 pm. Scott Teeple, Carrie Backman, Ross Wolf, and O’Shae Best, conductors.

ADDING A BEAT TO BRASS: Wisconsin Brass Quintet with Anthony DiSanza, professor of percussion
Thursday, October 25 @ 7:30 pm – $7 – $17. Click here to purchase tickets. Free to music majors, staff and faculty.

Guest Artist Residency and Recital: Clive Greensmith, cello
Friday, October 26, 3 – 6 PM: Cello and chamber music master class. Morphy Hall.
Saturday, Oct. 27, 2:30 – 4:30 PM: Presentation for strings: “The artistic use of vibrato,” Mills Hall.
Sunday, Oct. 28, 7:30 PM: Concert with Clive Greensmith and Christopher Taylor, piano; Uri Vardi, cello; and the UW-Madison Cello Choir.

Pro Arte Quartet
Saturday, October 27 @ 8:00 pm.

UW Wind Ensemble
Sunday, October 28 @ 2:00 pm. Scott Teeple, Cole Hairston, and O’Shae Best, conductors.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to the School of Music.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.