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Concert News: Christopher Taylor offers Beethoven, Corigliano & more–Fourth Brass Fest just around the corner

Upcoming Concerts at the Mead Witter School of Music

For the full calendar (many more events) please see http://www.music.wisc.edu/events/

PIANIST CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR: Saturday, September 23, 8 PM, Mills Hall

On the program:
Corigliano’s Fantasia on an Ostinato
Beethoven’s Symphony #7 (arr. Liszt)
Schubert’s Moments Musicaux
Rachmaninoff’s Moments Musicaux

Christopher Taylor’s conceptual program features Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, arranged by Franz Liszt. Over 175 years later, NYC-based composer John Corigliano would use Beethoven’s 7th to inspire his Fantasia on an Ostinato.

On the second half of the program, Taylor will feature two takes on the title “Moments Musicaux”: first, Schubert’s version, published in the last year of his life (1828), then he’ll perform Rachmaninoff’s version from the start of his career.

Tickets: $15 adults, $5 non-School of Music students and children. Ticket information here.


BRASS FEST IV: Concerts & master classes, Saturday, September 30 & Sunday, October 1, Mills Hall & classrooms

We invite students of all ages to discover the brass quintet genre and its myriad of musical styles, and offer a chance for young brass players to meet and mingle with other like-minded musicians.

This year’s guests will be the Beaumont Brass Quintet from Michigan State University. They, along with our own fabulous Wisconsin Brass Quintet, will perform a concert on Saturday, September 30 at 8 pm, featuring arrangements (such as a Bach Partita arranged for brass by our own trombone professor, Mark Hetzler) and original brass works. Those will include “Music for Lighthorses” by David Biedenbender; “Quintet for Brass” by Andrew Duncan; and “Night-Shining White” by Zhou Tian. Cost: Free.

On Sunday, October 1, 2:30 PM, our concert will include both quintets and top college students. There will also be a reception afterwards, for all in attendance. On the program: Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition” for brass and percussion. Cost: $15 adults, $5 students (MWSOM students free). Ticket information here. 

Download the full program here

For specific master class rooms & times, see posted hallway signs.

Sponsored by

 

Past Brass Fest guests have included tubist Oystein Baadsvik from Norway, trumpeter Adam Rapa with vocalist Elizabeth Vik, the youthful Axiom Brass from Chicago and the internationally-known Stockholm Chamber Brass on their first United States tour.

Listen to “A Little Russian Circus,” movement 1, composed by Anthony DiLorenzo, performed by Stockholm Chamber Brass, the Wisconsin Brass Quintet, and college students at Brass Fest III.

See you in Humanities!


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

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Welcome back, everyone!

Welcome to the 2017-2018 academic year at the Mead Witter School of Music!

We hope you had an enjoyable, relaxing and productive summer.  We’re ready to begin the fall semester with plenty of news and events.

New faculty

Introducing Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet; Alex Noppe, adjunct professor of trumpet; Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz drums & jazz history; Timothy Hagen, adjunct professor of flute; David Scholl, instructor of double bass; and Chad Hutchinson, adjunct professor of instrumental conducting, director of orchestras and conductor of University Opera.  Read their biographies here.

New digital music studio

This fall, the Mead Witter School of Music will add a new studio to Humanities: the Electro-Acoustic Research Space (EARS). Located in a former classroom, EARS will be stuffed with the latest electronic music equipment, and will be available to faculty, students, and collaborators within the School of Music and in other departments. Read the announcement here.

Grand opening: Friday, September 15, 7:30 PM, Room 2401 (street level), Mosse Humanities Building, 455 North Park Street.

Prof. Dan Grabois in the new EARS studio, being interviewed by a writer from the local weekly, Isthmus.

Ten Years of the Perlman Piano Trio!

Last spring marked the tenth year of the Perlman Piano Trio, a student ensemble founded and supported by Kato Perlman. Learn more about the history of the trio with this special slideshow.

https://spark.adobe.com/page-embed.jsTen Years of the Perlman Piano Trio

New book about the Pro Arte Quartet

Local historian emeritus and classical music reviewer John W. Barker has penned an authoritative biography of the Pro Arte Quartet, with a comprehensive look at the members and the music.  Titled “The Pro Arte Quartet: A Century of Musical Adventure on Two Continents,” it is the first full biography of the quartet, which is comprised of members David Perry, Suzanne Beia, Sally Chisholm, and Parry Karp. The 353-paged book, published by Boydell & Brewer, Limited, will be available for purchase on November 15th. The book was commissioned in 2011 by the School of Music. Learn more here.

Music Education program scores high in online magazine

College Magazine, an online publication founded as a print magazine in 2007 by a student at the University of Maryland, placed UW-Madison above such luminaries as Johns Hopkins and Berklee.

The Madison approach to music ed emphasizes community outreach, research, and social justice, says Associate Professor Teryl Dobbs, chair of the music education program. “We recently created an entire revision of the entire undergraduate music ed degree and teacher licensure program… for 21st century students and the diverse students that our own students will teach,”  Dobbs said.  The story was sponsored by the National Association of Music Merchants.  Read the story here.

Over the past several years, Prof. Dobbs has traveled the world presenting her research into the Holocaust and music education as part of the “Performing the Jewish Archive” project. In Vienna last spring, she joined with former visiting professor Elizabeth Hagedorn to present ideas on curriculum revisions to develop deeper understandings of music outside the usual university canon.

On Sept. 17, hear Prof. Dobbs along with Prof. Rachel Brenner of the Center for Jewish Studies and Jessica Kasinski, recent DMA graduate, in a “University of the Air” program with Emily Auerbach and Norman Gilliland. “Why Teach the Holocaust?” will air from 4 to 5 PM on the Ideas Network of Wisconsin Public radio. It will be archived at https://www.wpr.org/programs/university-air

This September, Prof. Dobbs will travel to South Africa for more presentations and eventsRead about “Performing the Jewish Archive” here.

New classes offered this fall

The School of Music will offer two new classes this fall. Please contact the instructor (click the name below) to learn if you may register or possibly audit. Non-majors are welcome.

Music 497 – Jazz History

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 AM- 12:15 PM, room 2411 Humanities. With Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz history & drums
This course focuses on cultural influences on the western development of jazz. By exploring historical and ethnographic works by scholars in ethnomusicology, history, anthropology, and communication, this course examines cultural aspects that influenced traditional and contemporary genres of jazz. Along with learning about the music that has influenced today’s popular genres through interactive participation and conversation, you’ll also develop tools to create case & field studies to study music through culture, and vice versa. Limit: 30 students.

Music 268, Lab 3 – Drumming the World Ensemble

Wednesdays, 1:20 to 3:15 PM, room 1321 Humanities.  Open to all  students; required for music education majors.

With Todd Hammes, percussion instructor. Drumming the World Ensemble is a structured drum circle wherein the music will be created by the class based on the study and application of drumming traditions from around the world. Instruments provided and will include Djembe, Conga, Dumbek, Darabuka, Bells, Rattles, and found objects. Limit: 15 students.

Upcoming concerts – September only

For future listings, please click here for our concert calendar. Our semesters are very full!

Concerts are free admission unless otherwise indicated.

Canceled: Annual Labor Day Karp Family concert

Faculty Recital: Mimmi Fulmer, voice, with guest pianist Craig Randal Johnson. September 10 @ 1:30 pm. Music celebrating Finland’s 100th anniversary of independence.

Faculty Recital: Paul Rowe, voice; Martha Fischer, piano. September 15 @ 8:00 pm.  A program of German art songs, in partnership with the German Department.

Faculty Recital: Jeanette Thompson, soprano, with guests Thomas Kasdorf, piano; and Paul Rowe, baritone. September 22 @ 7:00 pm. Lieder and spirituals.

Faculty Recital: Christopher Taylor, piano. September 23 @ 8:00 pm. $5 – $15. SOM students and faculty free admission.

Christopher Taylor performing in Mills Hall, Feb. 2015. Photo by Michael R. Anderson.

Pro Arte Quartet – September 24 @ 7:30 pm.  David Perry and Suzanne Beia, violin; Sally Chisholm, viola; and Parry Karp, cello.
An all-Mozart program with guest cellist Jean-Michel Fonteneau
and guest clarinetist Alicia Lee.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a 24-page newsletter/calendar that is printed and mailed every August. To receive a copy, click here to send us your postal address in an email.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Announcing New Faculty at the Mead Witter School of Music

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Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Contact:

Katherine Esposito
608.263.5615
kesposito@wisc.edu

The Mead Witter School of Music is pleased to announce the hiring of new faculty. These include one new assistant professor and four new adjunct professors in addition to two instructors. Five of these new faculty replace retired professors John Aley, trumpet; James Smith, orchestra; Linda Bartley, clarinet (interim 2016-2017: Amy McCann); Richard Davis, bass; and Stephanie Jutt, flute.


Alicia Lee, assistant professor of clarinet

Born into a musical family, Alicia Lee grew up in Michigan, where she began playing violin and piano at the age of five and switched to clarinet at the age of 12.

Before her appointment at the Mead Witter School of Music, she maintained a busy freelance career throughout New York City, performing and touring regularly with a variety of groups, including the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Knights, Alarm Will Sound, NOVUS, and ACME. She has performed at the Marlboro, Lucerne, Spoleto (Italy and US), Yellow Barn, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and Bay Chamber music festivals.

Lee is a founding member of Decoda, a chamber music collective comprised of virtuoso musicians, entrepreneurs, and passionate advocates of the arts. The artists of Decoda first collaborated with one another in the renowned Ensemble ACJW fellowship program, created by Carnegie Hall, and they now extend that relationship as the Affiliate Ensemble of Carnegie Hall. She has been fortunate to travel for residencies and performances in venues as diverse as the Guildhall School in London, Lee Correctional Institute in South Carolina, DePauw University, The Colburn School, and Merida, Mexico. She is also the director and on the faculty of the Decoda Skidmore Chamber Music Institute.

Lee is the newest member of the contemporary music group NOW Ensemble, a dynamic collective of composers and performers with the goal of creating music as a continuous collaboration between both parties. Lee was formerly the associate principal and E-flat clarinet player of the Santa Barbara Symphony, a position she held for seven seasons. She also performed as solo bass clarinetist of the Bergen Philharmonic in Norway during the 2013-14 season. She holds a bachelor’s degree in French lLanguage and literature from Columbia University, and pursued musical studies at The Juilliard School with Charles Neidich and Ayako Oshima as a part of the Columbia-Juilliard exchange program. She earned additional degrees from the University of Southern California and The Colburn School, where she was a student of Yehuda Gilad.

Chad Hutchinson, adjunct professor of orchestras

Newly appointed conductor Chad Hutchinson will lead the Symphony Orchestra, All-University Strings, and University Opera productions. He will also teach undergraduate and graduate conducting courses.

The past two seasons, Hutchinson was assistant conductor of the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra and music director of the South Dakota Symphony Youth Orchestras. During his tenure, he led the SDSO in numerous pops concerts including artists Ben Folds, Michael Cavanaugh and Steve Lippia, implemented the orchestra’s inaugural season of Carnegie Hall’s Link Up program in a partnership with the Sioux Falls Public School District, conducted Family Concerts and led the annual “Christmas on the Prairie” concert in Hoven, SD. Working with students ages 8-18 and conducting three of the four ensembles within the organization, Hutchinson helped the SDSYO grow to the largest enrollment in the program’s history, gaining over 75 students in two seasons. As part of its commitment to new music, each SDSYO ensemble featured a living composer on every concert in the 2016-2017 season. In addition, the Youth Orchestra performed works by and had residencies with John Luther Adams and Theodore Wiprud while also being one of only three youth ensembles in the country to premiere “Dreamtime Ancestors” by Christopher Theofanidis.

As comfortable in the pit as on the stage, he has recently led productions of Suor Angelica, Le Nozze di Figaro, Susannah and Lady in the Dark with University Opera Theater at the University of Minnesota and The Mikado at Morningside College. Last year he was awarded third place in the American Prize in Opera Conducting and was recently a finalist for the 2017 Pierre Monteux Prize in conducting.

With a long-standing commitment to education, Hutchinson taught orchestra in the public schools for nine years in Williamsville, NY and Sioux Falls, SD with both programs doubling in size during his tenure. He later taught collegiately at Iowa’s Northwestern College and was the coordinator and music director of the Siouxland Youth Orchestras in Sioux City, Iowa. He has served as a guest conductor for numerous orchestras and festivals throughout the Midwest, Montana and New York and will return for his third summer on the conducting faculty of the International Music Camp. As a conducting fellow, he has been selected to participate in conducting workshops at the Juilliard School, Eastman School of Music, the New England Conservatory of Music, the Richmond Symphony and the Bohuslav Martinu Philharmonic Orchestra.

An Iowa native, Hutchinson holds conducting degrees from the University of Minnesota and Bowling Green State University and a bachelor’s degree in music education from Morningside College. Away from the University, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two daughters, training for triathlons and rooting for the Kansas City Royals.

Matthew Endres, adjunct professor of jazz percussion and jazz history

Born in Sauk City, Matthew Endres received his bachelor’s of music degree at UW-Stevens Point, his master’s degree in jazz studies from the University of Illinois, and his doctoral degree in jazz studies and ethnomusicology at the University of Illinois. Endres has performed extensively as a bandleader and as a sideman in national and international venues. He is the drummer for the Downbeat award winning group “Old Style Sextet.” In 2014, they performed in the world renowned Cotai Jazz and Blues Festival in Macau, China. Endres has appeared on multiple albums including the “Old Style Sextet” self-titled album under “blu jazz records” (2014); “It’s About Time” (2013) with the “Adrian Barnett Septet”; Chris Beyt’s “120” (2015); The Clark Gibson Studio Orchestra’s record entitled “Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements” under “blu jazz records” (2015); and the yet-to-be-released University of Illinois Concert Jazz Band’s record entitled “The Music of Pepper Adams.”

Endres was a top three finalist for the nationally renowned premier big bands “The Jazz Ambassadors” and the “Army Blues,” two of the top big bands in the country. He has been fortunate to work with talented artists including Chris Potter, Doc Severinson, Rufus Reid, Brad Leali, Chris Brubeck, Charles McPhearson, Frank Gambale, Tom Garling, Victor Garcia, Michael Blum, Shawn Purcell, Darden Purcell, Oliver Nelson Jr, Jim Pugh, Dave Pietro, Grammy award winner Charles “Chip” McNeill, Ron Bridgwater, Dave D’Angelo, Carlos Vega, Larry Gray, Glenn Wilson, Richard Drexler, Mark Colby, Alex Graham, Clark Gibson, Tito Carrillo, John “Chip” Stephens, Joan Hickey, and Adrian Barnett. Endres currently holds an endorsement with Bopworks Drumsticks, based in Austin, Texas.

Alex Noppe, adjunct professor of trumpet

Green Bay native Alex Noppe has had a diverse performing and teaching career as a soloist, chamber musician, orchestral player, and jazz/commercial artist. He is a founding member of and the resident composer/arranger for the Mirari Brass Quintet, which for eight years has performed in concert halls, universities, schools, and churches in over 30 states and China. Alex has performed with numerous other ensembles across the country, holding positions in the Lansing Symphony, Columbus-Indiana Philharmonic, Monroe Symphony, and the Terre Haute Symphony. He has also performed with the Charlotte Symphony, Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Opera, Boise Philharmonic, Shreveport Symphony, and many others. Additional performing credits include the Indianapolis Jazz Orchestra, Hal Leonard Jazz Orchestra, David Baker Big Band, and the Diamond Empire Band. As a chamber musician, he has performed across the United States and in Thailand with the Black Bayou Brass Trio as well as many brass quintets. Alex has played for five years with the Louis Romanos Quartet, which fuses New Orleans jazz with Latin and world music in a variety of rhythmic patterns. LRQ has released several recordings, toured across the country, and performed on the Jazz Maui Festival. He has appeared on stage or performed with Eric Alexander, Chris Potter, Randy Brecker, Wayne Bergeron, Johnny Mathis, Hank Jones, the Count Basie Orchestra, the Rolling Stones Project, Sylvia McNair, Byron Stripling, Wycliffe Gordon, John Clayton, Leonard Slatkin, and Garrison Keillor.

Alex has been featured as a soloist with the Green Bay Civic Symphony, Boise State Orchestra, Performing Arts Institute Wind Ensemble, Indiana University Singers, ULM Symphony Orchestra, and was the solo “cellophonist” on David Baker’s Concerto for Cell Phones and Orchestra with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. He has been a performer or clinician at the International Association of Jazz Educators Conference, the Big XII Trombone Conference, the NAfME Northwest Conference, the International Tuba & Euphonium Conference, the International Trumpet Guild Conference, and the College Music Society National Conference. From 2004 to 2010 he served as Director of Jazz at the Performing Arts Institute summer music festival and also has taught at the UW-Green Bay Summer Music Clinic and Boise State Chamber Music Camp. Alex was the organizer and inaugural director of the Idaho All-State Jazz Ensemble, and has served as a clinician/guest artist for festivals in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Louisiana, Indiana, Michigan, Nebraska, and Wisconsin. For four years, he served as executive director of the Gene Harris Jazz Festival in Boise.

In addition to numerous compositions and arrangements written for the Mirari Brass, he has had works premiered by the Arbor Brass Choir, University of Michigan Jazz Ensemble, and Black Bayou Brass. Recording credits include Smack Dab in the Middle from John Clayton and the Hal Leonard Jazz Orchestra, Celestial Dancers by the Philharmonia a Vent, and William Bolcom: Songs of Innocence and Experience featuring Leonard Slatkin and the University of Michigan Symphony Orchestra, which was awarded three Grammy awards in 2006. Alex can be heard on numerous recordings from the Hal Leonard Music Company and FJH Music, and is featured on recent critically acclaimed releases from the Mirari Brass Quintet and the Wave Mechanics Union, as well as the multiple recent albums from the Louis Romanos Quartet.

Prior to his appointment at UW-Madison, Alex has held teaching positions at Boise State University, the University of Louisiana-Monroe, and has additionally taught at Indiana State University, Depauw University, and Indiana University. He holds a doctoral degree in brass literature and pedagogy from Indiana University as well as a master’s of music in trumpet performance from IU, studying with John Rommel, Anthony Plog, and David Baker. He also has dual bachelor degrees in trumpet performance and jazz studies from the University of Michigan, where he studied with William Campbell, William Lucas, Ellen Rowe, and Dennis Wilson. Alex is a Conn-Selmer Endorsing Artist and plays on Bach trumpets.

Timothy Hagen, adjunct professor of flute

Newly appointed to the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Timothy Hagen is an internationally acclaimed flutist, praised for his “technical virtuosity and musical sensitivity” (NewMusicBox). He won first prize as well as the award for Best Performance of the Newly Composed Work (Gary Schocker’s Prestidigitation, or POOF!) at the 2016 Myrna W. Brown Artist Competition, sponsored by the Texas Flute Society. Past awards include second prize at the Australian International Flute Competition, the Jack Smith Memorial Award for Most Promising Talent at the Pasadena Showcase House Instrumental Competition, two artist grants from the Léni Fé Bland Foundation, and the prestigious graduate scholarship from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. He was also the only American semifinalist named in the 2007 Jeunesses Musicales International Flute Competition in Serbia.

As principal flute of the Missouri Symphony, Hagen spends his summers in Columbia, MO, where he has performed multiple times as a concerto soloist. He has also substituted regularly with the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas and as principal flute with the Dallas Wind Symphony. Over the past decade, he has been active as a guest musician with ensembles throughout the country, including the Minnesota Orchestra, San Antonio Symphony, Eugene Symphony, Midland-Odessa Symphony, Las Colinas Symphony, and Winston-Salem Symphony. In addition, he has had solo debuts at New York’s Lincoln Center and 92nd Street Y and performed at the Atlantic, Hot Springs, and Las Vegas Music Festivals, as well as the Norfolk and Austin Chamber Music Festivals.

The depth and breadth of Hagen’s experience as an educator distinguish him. In addition to his current role at UW-Madison, he has taught at Oklahoma State University, The University of Texas at Austin, Lincoln Center, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Dallas Symphony, and Brookhaven College, among many other fine institutions. His students have consistently won regional and national awards and auditions, and he is in high demand as a teacher, clinician, and speaker at universities, festivals, and conventions throughout the United States, Canada, and Australia. He is also frequently called upon as an adjudicator on regional and national levels, including for the National Flute Association’s Young Artist and Piccolo Artist competitions.

Increasingly in demand as a composer, Hagen has won awards from the American Composers Forum and MetLife Creative Connections. His chamber and solo works for flute, published by Owl Glass Music, have been commissioned and performed throughout the United States and were mentioned favorably in the February 2014 issue of Flute Talk. He composed the newly commissioned work for the Texas Flute Society’s 2017 Myrna W. Brown Artist Competition, and upcoming commissions include a piece for alto flute and piano for Marianne Gedigian (Professor of Flute at the University of Texas at Austin), and a work for piccolo and piano to honor the legacy of longtime Cincinnati Symphony solo piccoloist, Jack Wellbaum. His pedagogical and scholarly work is published by Owl Glass and in national and international journals, such as the NFA’s Flutist Quarterly and the British Flute Society’s Pan.

Service to his musical community is also important to Hagen, as demonstrated in his volunteer roles. He is currently on the National Flute Association’s pedagogy committee and co-coordinates its annual Youth Flute Day. Additionally, he served as board member and master class coordinator for the Texas Flute Society from 2014-2017 and as corporate sponsorship chair on the board of the award-winning Flute New Music Consortium from 2015-2016.

Hagen received his DMA from the University of Texas at Austin, a professional studies certificate from the Colburn School, a master’s degree in music from the University of Southern California, and a bachelor’s degree in music from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. His former flute teachers include Jim Walker, Marianne Gedigian, Philip Dunigan, Renée Siebert, Tadeu Coelho, Chelsea Czuchra, Felicia McNaught, and Tina Ballard.

David Scholl, instructor of double bass

Double bassist David Scholl, newly appointed to the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, currently serves as principal bass of the Madison, Quad City, and Dubuque Symphonies. He frequently appears with Elgin, Rockford, and South Bend Symphonies, among others, and was previously a member of the Illinois Symphony. David is also active in the new music community, including appearances as a guest artist on Chicago Symphony’s MusicNOW series, University of Chicago’s Contempo series, and with the Spektral Quartet.

In addition to his work as a performer, David maintains an active private studio. He also appears as a guest clinician in music programs in and around the Midwest. A product of the public school system himself, David makes it a priority to present in public schools and non-profit music programs, including UW-Madison’s Summer Music Clinic.

David was born and raised in Bellevue, Washington and started bass in fifth grade. He received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Indiana University, where he studied bass with Bruce Bransby. While there he also studied historical performance from distinguished professor Stanley Ritchie, and spent the summers studying bass with Owen Lee, Jeff Turner, and Peter Lloyd. David continued studies as a fellow at the Aspen Music Festival and at the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, where he was principal bass and studied with Alex Hanna.

Matthew Richardson, instructor of musicology

Matthew Richardson, associate instructor of ethnomusicology, has taught world music at UW-Madison since fall of 2016. Earlier that year, he completed his Ph.D in musicology at Northwestern University; his primary research investigates aesthetics and fan culture in the Japanese pop music genre known as idol music. He uses approaches from semiotics, mediation, and aesthetic philosophy to understand the role music plays in cultures’ attempts to understand one another. His other research interests include the introduction of European music to mid-nineteenth-century Japan and representations of Japan in U.S. and European culture. His master’s degree is also from Northwestern, and he earned a bachelor’s degree in music history from Oberlin College, minoring in trombone. (Photograph coming soon.)

The Carillon returns!

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
May 26, 2017

The Carillon returns!

We are happy to report that the UW-Madison Memorial Carillon concerts will resume on Sunday, May 28, 2017, at 3 pm, with Sunday afternoon concerts on the second and fourth Sundays of the month at least through the end of the summer (August).  Lyle Anderson, carillonneur, will return after having retired from state employment in August 2016.  Since that time, several safety, security and environmental issues in the 80-year-old tower have been addressed. The process is ongoing, so public access to the interior of the tower is not currently possible, but the carillon is best listened to in the area near the tower, on Observatory Drive across from Bascom Hall.

The History of the UW-Madison Memorial Carillon

Bells have been called man’s most universal musical instrument. The UW Memorial Carillon Tower and its bells have been a symbol of the Madison campus for over 80 years. Early in the 20th century, thought was given to provide the dome then atop Bascom Hall with a chime of bells (about a dozen bells that would play melodies). After the dome burned in 1916, ten years of graduating classes, from 1917 through 1926, contributed their senior gifts, called Class Memorials, to this purpose. By 1932 it was clear the dome was never going to be rebuilt, but the fund had accrued enough interest to consider building a free-standing tower and furnishing it with a 36-bell carillon, an instrument with a long history in the area of present-day Belgium, northern France and the Netherlands, where it had reached a high degree of perfection in the 17th century. But by the late 19th century, even the art of making a well-tuned bell was completely lost, to be rediscovered in England in 1899. The firm of Gillett and Johnston, of Croydon, England, became a leading bell foundry and began installing carillons in North America in the 1920s, providing a set of 25 bells in 1936 for the University of Wisconsin tower. The tower had been completed nearly a year previous, at a cost of about $30,000.

Although five additional small bells were added in 1937, by the late 1950s, four octaves of about 49 bells had become desirable to play most carillon music, so the carillon was expanded in 1963 to 51 bells, the additional bells cast by the French firm of Paccard, but with a keyboard that would accommodate 56 bells, paid for entirely by funds raised among Wisconsin alumni. The largest of the original bells cast in England weighs about 3,000 pounds, but it was always anticipated that eventually the carillon would be anchored by a bell weighing nearly 7,000 pounds. This was achieved in 1973 with the addition of five large bells made by the Royal Eijsbouts foundry of Asten, the Netherlands, who incidentally also replaced all of the French bells installed ten years earlier.

All the bells in the carillon are stationary, being rung by clappers inside each bell that are connected to a fairly simple, completely mechanical mechanism of wires and bars to a keyboard in the room just below the belfry. This is arranged much like a piano keyboard except that the keys are rounded wooden batons played with the ends of a closed hand instead of with fingers. The lowest 18 bells can also be played with the feet, to expand the instrument’s musical versatility. Since the instrument cannot ever be played in any sort of privacy, learning and practicing are accomplished by having a second keyboard with the same dimensions as the “real” one, but striking only small metal bars that are the same pitch as the bells.

Norris Wentworth ’24 led the committee that planned the tower’s construction and became the first “player of the bells,” serving until 1941. Then the carillon was played mostly on a voluntary basis by a series of students in the School of Music. In 1960 Professor John Wright Harvey became the first faculty appointed carillonneur, retiring in 1984, followed by Lyle Anderson in 1986, in a part-time academic staff position, until 2016.

 

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season newsletter/brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your address to the School of Music, Room 5544, 455 North Park Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53706.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

News of Students, Graduation Celebration & Details of Final Concerts

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
April 25, 2017

Note: On Friday, May 12, from 2 to 4 PM, the School of Music will host an Awards & Graduation Celebration in Music Hall, the clock tower across from Humanities at the bottom of Bascom Hill. Join us for festivities, conversation, congratulations, and food!

Student accolades are rolling in!

Wisconsin native Jerod Reetz, a doctoral student in composition studying with now-retired professor Stephen Dembski, has received a commission to write a work for low flutes. Low flutes include the following instruments: alto flute, bass flute, contrabass flute, subcontrabass flute, and hyperbass flute.

Jerod Reetz

The $250 commission is the 2017 Peter Sheridan Low Flutes Opportunity Award, awarded by the Madison Flute Club during the Wisconsin Flute Festival in early March.


Bassoonist Ranveer Vasdev has been awarded the Leo and Jean Besozzi Scholarship, which provides a one-time, $1,500 award to a high achieving senior. In addition to pursuing his music degree, Ranveer is also currently doing research with the Department of Comparative  Bioscience. In early spring 2015 Ranveer was invited to play at an international wind band festival at Carnegie Hall. He also hopes to attain a MD/PhD practicing pediatric pulmonology and researching diaphragmatic and intercostal neuroplasticity.


Saxophonist Rachel Heuer has won the Ann Durra Scholarship from the College of Letters & Sciences. This scholarship provides a one-time, $3,000 award to a high achieving junior or senior pursuing a degree in mathematics, the physical sciences, or the natural sciences. In addition to pursuing her music degree in jazz performance, Rachel is also pursuing a degree in molecular biology. She has played self-composed original pieces at Jazz at Five weekly concerts on Capitol Square. She also works in a lab on campus studying heart disease.


Percussionist Aaron Gochberg has won a Hilldale Undergraduate Research Award for his past and continued research into Cuban music and folklore.


Will Porter

Doctoral trombonist Will Porter, a student of Mark Hetzler, has won a $10,000 dissertation fellowship from the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. Porter is one of two UW-Madison doctoral candidates to win the award, and they are two of only ten winners in the United States.

Porter’s project is focused on music education in Mozambique. His doctoral research examines the relationship between classical-music education and social development. It focuses on the Xiquitsi (“Shi-keet-see”) Project in Mozambique, an emergent classical-music education and outreach project inspired by the El Sistema orchestral training program in Venezuela.


Weekend on Tap: Some Ticketed, Some Free

UW Wind Ensemble, Student Recitals, Concert Band, and a Quartet Performance round out the year. See http://www.music.wisc.edu/events/

See below for ticketing information.

Concert Choir with cellist Matt Haimovitz, violist Sally Chisholm and student soloists

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Mills Hall
Beverly Taylor, conductor
$15 adults, $5 non-SOM students

Read the Isthmus preview by Jay Rath.

Conductor Beverly Taylor’s vision for this concert is “Art Born of Tragedy.” It includes the work Après moi, le deluge, a lament on the destruction of New Orleans in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina, with cellist Matt Haimovitz, and a work, on Paris, by faculty composer Laura Schwendinger about the 2015 bombings in Paris, with viola soloist Sally Chisholm. In addition are works by Robert Fountain, John Wilbye, Joseph Gregorio, as well as several spirituals. The Concert Choir is one of UW-Madison’s most advanced ensembles, and released a CD in 2016.

Beverly Taylor writes:
“To our listeners,
I’ve been thinking about this program for a long time.  In tragic circumstances, such as we’ve experienced in our lifetimes, and certainly in the last twenty years, many of us are caught in a web of grief and frustration.  Our need to be of help may come out in works of social justice or aid, or volunteerism.  But for many of us we also may feel that the circumstances of the event are so overwhelming that we may withdraw inside, unable to wrap our minds around a pathway to follow; we may grow a shell of busy-ness that keeps us from feeling both joy and sorrow.
“After 9/11, the Onion came out with an issue; I told one of my grad students at the time that nothing funny could follow such an incident, so I was unready to read the article he handed me.  But on some deep and ridiculous level the headline stayed with me:  Woman, not knowing what else to do, bakes flag cake.
“So we come to what artists may do in the wake of tragedies—large public tragedies and ones kept inside of us.  Artists may not bake a flag cake, but they turn their strong feelings and ideas into works that may plumb the sorrow, turn the sorrow into an idea, turn an idea into action, or make us view any tragedy in a new way.  Musical artists cannot necessarily predict the emotional or intellectual effects on the listeners; they can only present their ideas in sound, which are interpreted by the performers.
“And being the very mortal beings we are, it is hard to keep our contemplation centered on these ideas for long, as they are potent, so tonight we vary our content with music of several centuries, varying the gentle and the loud, early music with modern spirituals of overcoming adversity, works written long ago with those written this year, in the hope of bringing a fresh look and sound to profound ideas. Thank you for coming on this musical journey with us.”

Download the program here.

Matt Haimovitz will visit host Norman Gilliland on “The Midday,” Wisconsin Public Radio, this Thursday, April 27, at noon. 88.7 FM.


UW Jazz Week with bassist Linda Oh, the UW High School Honors Jazz Band, and the UW Jazz Orchestra

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Music Hall
Johannes Wallmann, director
$15 adults, $5 non-SOM students.
Additional concerts Tuesday, April 25 & Thursday, April 27

Fresh off first place in the Big Band category at the Eau Claire Jazz Festival, the UW Jazz Orchestra is ready to swing to the music of Oliver Nelson, Clay Jenkins, Cedar Walton, Dave Douglas and Pat Metheny. The Honors Jazz Band plans to perform works by Kenny Wheeler, Jeff Jarvis, and Frederick “Dave” Snider.

Meanwhile, by happy coincidence, bassist Linda Oh is on the cover of April’s Jazz Times magazine. Oh is now appearing regularly with jazz guitarist Pat Metheny. “Linda is exactly right for me right now,” Metheny says. “because she embodies the kind of listening that I always love, but that I am particularly looking for at the moment. Simply, put, she is one of the most exciting new musicians I have heard in a long time on her instrument.”

Download the program here.

Linda Oh will appear on WORT Radio this Thursday, April 27, 3 PM, on the “Strictly Jazz” show with host Steven Braunginn.


Choral Union & UW Symphony – Two Concerts

Saturday, April 29 8 PM, Mills Hall
Sunday, April 30, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall
Beverly Taylor, conductor
Tickets: $15 adults, $8 students.

Presenting Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d (text by Walt Whitman).

A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois.  The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington.  The work is in memory of “those we loved.”

Our soloists will be Jennifer D’Agostino, soprano, and James Held, baritone.

Jennifer D’Agostino is currently assistant professor of music in voice at Walsh University in Canton, Ohio. She received her DMA at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in voice performance with a minor in opera production.

Jennifer has performed major operatic roles in The Magic FluteSusannahA Hand of BridgeSweeney ToddRoman FeverThe Mikado, Little WomenThe Most Happy Fella’, Maria Stuarda, and The Consul. She directed & premiered the role of ‘Ethyl Wormvarnish’ in Jerry Hui’s opera Wired for Love.

Internationally, Jennifer has performed as a soloist in Rossini’s Messa di Gloria in Pesaro, Italy with Benton Hess and under the baton of Eduoardo Mueller at AIMS in Graz, Austria.

She has been a participant, soloist and instructor with the Madison Early Music Festival. In 2012, she collaborated with pianist and UW grad Kirstin Ihde at the Baldwin-Wallace Art Song Festival. Jennifer was chosen as a NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing) Intern, summer 2013. She presented at the Lily Conference in 2016 on teaching techniques in the private vocal lesson.

James Held is a versatile performer with experience in a variety of styles including musical theatre, new works, and traditional concert and operatic repertoire. Recent performances include King Henry VIII and Jesus the Beloved in Passion Trilogy with The Fisher Ensemble, Oliver Hix in Meredith Willson’s The Music Man and The Sacristan in Tosca with the Colorado Symphony, Sheriff Wells in Zach Redler’s A Song for Susan Smith, Guglielmo in Così fan tutte, The Pirate King in The Pirates of Penzance, and The Father in Hänsel und Gretel. Held was a Young Artist with the prestigious Seagle Music Colony where he performed such roles as Sid in Albert Herring and Leporello in Don Giovanni. He is currently the baritone studio artist with Madison Opera where he appeared as the Second Priest/Second Armored Man in Die Zauberflöte and Paris in Roméo et Juliette. Held holds a master of music degree from the University of Colorado-Boulder and a bachelor of music degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He will be joining the Madison Symphony Chorus in Germany as the baritone soloist in Brahms’s Ein Deutsches Requiem.

Ticket information:

By Phone:
(608) 265-ARTS (2787)
By Mail:
Campus Arts Ticketing Box Office
800 Langdon Street
Madison, WI 53706
In person:
Box Office in Memorial Union, First Floor, 800 Langdon St
Box Office in Vilas Hall: 821 University Avenue, East Campus Mall side of the building.
Online: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/UWIM/?prod=UWCA

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Take your pick: School of Music overflowing all April with beautiful noise

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wednesday, April 5, 2017

For this issue, we’ve prepared a special e-blast of selected final concerts at the School of Music. Many more, including student recitals and small ensemble concerts, can be found on our events calendar.

We hope you will make time to attend at least one!  (Click links to read musician biographies and learn about concert programs.)

The Perlman Trio holds its annual recital

Saturday, April 8, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The trio, comprised of Chan Mi Jean, piano; Adam Dorn, violin; and Micah Cheng, cello, is sponsored by longtime donor Kato Perlman. The ensemble is chosen carefully to blend personalities and styles, and each spring concert is a treat for audiences. This year’s trio will present works of Haydn, Dvorak, and Brahms. There will be a reception after the concert.

The 2016-2017 Perlman Trio: Micah Cheng, viola; Chan Mi Jean, piano; and Adam Dorn, violin. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

32nd Annual Beethoven Piano Competition winners recital

2017 Beethoven Competition winners Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
This long-running event is sponsored by former UW-Madison chancellor Irving Shain. The 2017 winners are Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. The program will include Beethoven’s Sonata in C Major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”) (Kangwoo Jin); the Sonata in E Major, Op. 109 (Leah Kang); and the Sonata in A Major, Op. 101 (Alberto Peña-Cortes).


UW Symphony Orchestra Farewell Concert with Conductor James Smith

James Smith rehearses the UW Symphony for its final concert with him as conductor. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Professor James Smith, conductor of the UW Symphony and University Opera, came to UW-Madison in 1984 to conduct the Wind and Symphonic Ensembles and assumed orchestral conducting duties following the departure of David Becker. He has also served as longtime conductor of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra and will retire from that post as well.
Smith was a professional clarinetist prior to becoming a conductor.


The Hunt Quartet presents a spring concert

The Hunt Quartet, 2016-2017. L-R: Kyle Price, cello.; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; Chang-En Lu, violin. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Tuesday, April 11, 8:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The Hunt Quartet is the graduate string quartet at the School of Music, co-sponsored by Kato Perlman and the Madison Symphony Orchestra. The Quartet is an integral part of the Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Up Close and Musical” program, visiting area schools to teach students about fundamentals of music and the string quartet. This year’s members are Kyle Price, cello; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; and Chang-En Lu, violin.


Stephanie Jutt: Final Faculty Recital

Stephanie Jutt. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Thursday, April 13, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Flutist Stephanie Jutt bids farewell after 27 years
While at UW-Madison, Professor Stephanie Jutt founded Bach Dancing & Dynamite, a summer chamber music festival; UW-Madison’s Arts Venture Challenge; and shepherded many flutists through undergraduate and graduate work. She plans to continue as principal flutist with the Madison Symphony Orchestra and as artistic director of Bach Dancing & Dynamite.


Emery Stephens: African-American Songs and Spirituals

(Rescheduled from March 13)
Wednesday, April 12, 6:30 PM, Music Hall.  Free event.
Emery Stephens, baritone, is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals. Students will perform in a recital with Stephens and collaborative pianist professor Martha Fischer in a concert.


Pro Arte Quartet with guest artist Jazimina Macneil, mezzo-soprano

Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

The Pro Arte’s  final concert of the academic year will feature a rising star singer and a world premiere by composer John Harbison.

String Quartet in E Major, Op. 54 No. 3 (1788)
Joseph Haydn

The Cross of Snow for Contralto and String Quartet (2016)
John Harbison
World Premiere of Version for Voice and String Quartet

String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 16 (1874)
Antonín Dvořák


Annual Varsity Band Concerts with Mike Leckrone

Mike Leckrone at the Cotton Bowl, January 2017. Photograph by Gary Smith.

April 20, 21 and 22, Kohl Center, 601 Dayton Street. All shows 7 PM. $23. Buy tickets.
Help us welcome Mike Leckrone back from his recent surgery! Learn more here.


UW Wind Ensemble

Scott Teeple, conductor.
Wednesday, April 26, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.   Free event.

Scott Teeple. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

The Wind Ensemble offers a Wisconsin premiere of a work by Japanese composer Jun Nagao, and the Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble by Igor Stravinsky with Christopher Taylor on piano.

Guest bassist Linda Oh performs with Jazz Orchestra and UW High School Honors Jazz Band

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Music Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.
Additional events Tuesday -Thursday in Morphy Hall; click here for more information.
Johannes Wallmann, director

Our annual spring Jazz Fest features talented high school jazz musicians, who rehearse with the UW Jazz Orchestra and a guest. This year, our guest is bassist Linda Oh from New York City, who is featured on the cover of April’s Jazz Times magazine. Oh has played with many top musicians; she’ll appear with Pat Metheny at Ravinia on June 14. The week’s events include two free concerts and a ticketed concert on Friday night.

 


UW Concert Choir with cellist Matt Haimovitz

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Presenting “Après moi, le deluge” by composer Luna Pearl Woolf
and “for Paris,” a world premiere for solo viola and choir by UW-Madison composer Laura Schwendinger.

With the Concert Choir and Sally Chisholm, violist of the Pro Arte Quartet.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

“Ferociously talented” (New York Times) cellist Matt Haimovitz, known for his renditions of the Bach Cello Suites as well as Radiohead, will return to Madison on April 28 to perform a work that he premiered here 11 years ago with the UW Concert Choir, one of UW-Madison’s most advanced choirs.

Read full news release here.

Watch: Matt Haimovitz & Christopher O’Riley: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert, 2015


UW Choral Union & UW Symphony Orchestra

Saturday, April 29 (8 PM) and Sunday, April 30 (7:30 PM), Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$8 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

Presenting Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d (text by Walt Whitman).

A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois. The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington. The work is in memory of “those we loved.”

Below: The New York Philharmonic performed this work in 1946.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

A musical thank-you to the Mead Witter Foundation; Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Winners Announced; New Music Premieres & Papers at Musicology Consortium: “Jewish Archive” Project Continues Worldwide

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
March 8, 2017

Faculty Ensembles combine with Lincoln High students for a memorable concert

On February 9, two School of Music faculty ensembles – the Wisconsin Brass Quintet and the Wingra Wind Quintet – traveled to Wisconsin Rapids, the home of the Mead Witter Foundation, for a special concert to thank them for their support of the school of music. The two ensembles, plus the Wind Ensemble from Lincoln High School in Wisconsin Rapids, performed a side-by-side concert at the Performing Arts Center of Wisconsin Rapids after the students were coached by ensemble faculty and UW-Madison conductor Scott Teeple.

Afterwards, music engagement and outreach coordinator Beth Larson received this note from Jeanne Olson, director of bands at Lincoln High School: “Thank you so much for all of the time you spent organizing that event, my students loved it and learned so much! I had them write a reflection this week, and they were very positive and many listed countless things that they learned from the professors sitting in with them and then working with the small groups!! It was a very successful event!”
Photographs by Beth Larson.

Irving Shain Woodwind-Piano Duo Competition Winners to perform this Saturday

Irving Shain, former chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Photograph by Jeff Miller, university communications.

March 11, 4 PM, Morphy Hall.

This years’ duo winners are Rayna Slavova, piano with Chia-Yu Hsu, bassoon; and Kangwoo Jin, piano, with Eleni Katz, bassoon. The four will perform their winning selections at a free concert this Saturday.  Learn about the winning musicians and download the program.

Meet Yasha Hoffman, Russian Studies and composition double major

Yasha Hoffman.

Yasha Hoffman, a Minnesota native, grew up with parents of Soviet/Russian heritage and as a young child, fell in love with Russian folk songs. “One of my favorite activities was putting on ‘concerts’ for my parents where I’d loudly sing Soviet children’s songs and bang on the piano,” he says. He loves the breadth of opportunity offered by classes at UW-Madison. Read more about Yasha Hoffman.

“Performing the Jewish Archive” project continues worldwide

UW-Madison professor Teri Dobbs in Israel, Jordan, Michigan, and Vienna (upcoming)

This past January, Professor Teri Dobbs, a member of the Performing the Jewish Archive team, spent two weeks in Israel and Jordan. During her time there, she was a guest at Tel Aviv University’s Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, together with colleagues from UW-Madison’s Mosse-Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies. In addition, she conducted research in the Yad Vashem Archives, met with musicology/music education colleagues to discuss the possibility of future projects within Israel, and met with the family of piano prodigy and composer, Josima Feldschuh (d. 1943).

Teri Dobbs
Professor Teryl Dobbs. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Professor Dobbs will present several conference papers this coming semester, most of which pertain to her work with Performing the Jewish Archive. Her paper, “Music Education and the Holocaust: So What?” was heard at the New Directions in Music Education Conference: “Musicking Equity: Enacting Social Justice Through Music Education,” Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, February 17. Dobbs has been invited to present more two papers, one in collaboration with soprano and PtJA performer Elizabeth Hagedorn of Vienna, at the 25th European Association for Music in Schools/6th European International Society for Music Education regional conference, JOINT (AD)VENTURE MUSIC: Network as a Challenge for Music Educators, at the University Mozarteum, Salzburg, Austria, April 18 – 22, 2017.
Learn more here.

Read about prior Performing the Jewish Archive events in Madison, 2015-2016.


Selected Upcoming Events

Anthony Georgeson. Photograph by Thomas Bruce.

March 12, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.
UW Symphony with alumnus Anthony Georgeson, bassoon, conducted by James Smith. Georgeson is principal bassoon with The Florida Orchestra in St. Petersburg. Georgeson will play the Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191.  Other works will include Un Sourire pour Orchestre by Olivier Messiaen and Scheherazade by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.  This is the penultimate opportunity to see longtime conductor James Smith, who will retire this spring after 34 years at UW-Madison. His final appearance as conductor will be on April 9. 

James Smith, orchestra conductor.
James Smith, orchestra conductor.

March 14, 6:30 PM, Morphy Hall.
Emery Stephens, baritone, guest artist recital. Free concert.
Stephens is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit. Prof. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals and perform with students in a recital, with Professor Martha Fischer as collaborative pianist.

Emery Stephens

The Midwest Graduate Music Consortium – Presenting Original Research and New Compositions

Friday, March 31 and Saturday, April 1, Memorial Union and Mead Witter School of Music. Free events.

The Midwest Graduate Music Consortium (MGMC) is a joint venture organized by graduate students from Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. MGMC encourages the presentation of original research and the composition of new music by graduate students around the country. The 21st annual meeting will include paper sessions, a new music concert, and a keynote address. For the new music concert, seven composers’ works were chosen from a nationwide call for scores. The ensemble Sound Out Loud will perform the new works, each a world premiere. All of the composers will be in attendance.
Find the schedule and concert program at this link:
Midwest Graduate Music Consortium

Sound Out Loud

University Opera’s “Turn of the Screw” receives warm reviews

Katie Anderson (Governess) and Anna Polum (Miss Jessel) in ”The Turn of the Screw.” Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

“Much of the overall success of the show begins with decisions by Ronis (and executed by costume designers Sydney Krieger and Hyewon Park) to resist all temptation to make the specters of Quint (former valet of Bly’s master, who is far removed from the action of the story) and former governess Miss Jessel in any way ghoulish. Alec Brown and Anna Polum, in the roles on Friday night, looked fully human—and that’s just fine. The otherworldliness—and palpable evil—that they exude is in the music and the libretto itself,” wrote Greg Hettsmanberger in his blog, What Greg Says.

Doctoral cellist Andrew Briggs performs with Middleton Community Orchestra

At the March 1 concert of the Middleton Community Orchestra, cellist Andrew Briggs played two works by Antonin Dvorak: Silent Woods, Op. 68, No. 5,and Rondo in G minor for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 94. “Briggs played both of these with affectionate sensitivity. Currently finishing his doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music, he is an artist with an already expanding reputation and a great future,” wrote reviewer John Barker.

Andrew Briggs

On Monday, March 27, Andrew will perform a lecture/recital on his dissertation project, “Piatti and the Body: An Integrative Approach to Learning and Performing the 12 Caprices, Op. 25.”

Morphy Hall, 6:30 PM. Free.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.