Category Archives: Student Ensembles

Music Lessons after 55; Remembering Irv Shain; Perlman Concert April 14; Student Creates & Conducts

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music


University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

Reminder: The UW Wind Ensemble concert this Saturday, April 7, will be streamed live. The start time is 7:30 PM. Click here for the link.
A panoramic view of the Hamel Music Center under construction, March 2018
The Hamel Music Center, March 18, 2018. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

 

 

 

 

 

Music Lessons after 55!

Retired physician Tim Shaw has a new hobby: taking violin lessons from UW-Madison doctoral student Paula Su. “I’m lucky to have found Paula as a violin teacher,” he says. “She inspires me.” Shaw, who’s currently practicing the well-known tune, “Danny Boy,” says he discovered the Community Music Lessons program via an online search.

Tim Shaw and Paula Su. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Paula writes: “I was born in Taiwan, and I completed most of my education in Taiwan. After my master’s degree in violin performance and chamber music at University of Michigan, I played in Civic Orchestra of Chicago and also taught in the String Preparatory Academy in University of Michigan. Knowing that I enjoy teaching and also have some experience, Professor David Perry recommended that I join the CML program. The students in this program are very diverse. Some of them are undergraduate college students, some are PhD students, some are Epic employees, Tim is a retired doctor.”

“It is really fun to interact with different ages of people from different backgrounds. I draw much inspiration from my students and can also view myself through the teaching process.”

The Community Music Lessons program was founded in 1968 to help college students acquire experience teaching applied music lessons for children and adults. Lessons are provided by undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the School of Music who are overseen by individual faculty members, an experienced graduate coordinator, and a staff supervisor. Lessons are taught on campus, in the Mosse Humanities Building.

The program plans an informal recital on Sunday, April 29 in Morphy Hall from 3:00 to 5:00 PM.

Farewell and thank you to Irving Shain

Chancellor Irving Shain with the UW Symphony Orchestra, undated photograph.

Last month, we bade farewell to former Chancellor Irving Shain, who passed away on March 6 at the age of 92. Chancellor Shain was a champion of the piano, founding both the Shain Piano/Woodwind Duo Competition (recent concert on March 4) and the Beethoven Piano Competition, now in its 33rd year with a winners’ recital concert scheduled for April 15 at 3:30 PM in Morphy Hall. His contributions to the School of Music were significant. We have missed his presence at these concerts and we remember him with fondness.

Read more about Chancellor Shain at this link

Annual Perlman Trio concert April 14

With Kangwoo Jin, piano; Luke Valmadrid, violin and viola; Micah Cheng, violoncello; Suzanne Beia, violin; and Chang En Lu, violin.

Saturday, April 14, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall.

The Perlman Piano Trio is comprised of students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is generously supported by Kato Perlman who loves the magnificent piano chamber music repertoire. Members of the group are chosen on the basis of their outstanding work in the chamber music program at the University.

The program will include Haydn’s Piano Trio in C Major, Hob. XV:27; Schumann’s Piano Trio no.1 Op. 63; and Brahms’s Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25.

Student recitals in abundance

Morphy and Mills Hall and other venues (many off-campus) are now packed with student recitals.  Upcoming performers include pianist Eric Tran, a recent winner of our concerto competition; Zachary Pulse, an oboist incorporating electro-acoustic methods into his music; and singer Talia Engstrom, performing music by Grieg, Mozart, Rossini, and others. See events calendar here.

Student at the podium

Flutist Anna Fisher-Roberts was inspired to create her own orchestra, and will present her first concert on Sunday, April 15 at 3:30 PM in Mills Hall. The program consists of one work: Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring.

Anna Fisher-Roberts (left, with flute) and members of the Milwaukee High School of the Arts in an outreach concert, Spring 2017. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

“This project has been an exciting and enlightening journey,” writes Anna. “I came to music school intending to become a conductor, but since there are no undergraduate conducting programs, it’s difficult to get podium experience. I decided to put this project together mainly to get some time in front of an ensemble, but also for the opportunity to conduct Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring, one of my favorite pieces in the orchestral repertoire. This 13-piece orchestra is entirely Mead Witter students, and is run solely by me and the members of the ensemble.

“I have been soaking up as much conducting as I possibly can; I’ve been taking a conducting class since the beginning of the school year and took over conducting the flute ensemble in January. It’s very different being on the podium than sitting within the orchestra! I am looking at the music in a very different way than I do as a flutist, thinking about how to communicate gesturally and soundlessly to convey musical ideas. Throughout this process, I have had the privilege to work with conductors at the university: Scott Teeple, Chad Hutchinson, and Beverly Taylor. All have generously set aside time to help me to learn the score, and Dr. Hutchinson and Professor Teeple have even reviewed my video footage of my rehearsals and helped me to improve my rehearsal strategies and baton technique. I have also requested and welcomed suggestions from the musicians about how I can be more helpful to them as a conductor, and they always have excellent advice. As I continue in my career, I want to stay in touch with the musicians in my ensembles, to make the music as evocative as it can be.

“I plan to continue my conducting ventures this summer, starting with the Vienna Summer Music Festival Conducting Institute. This is a three-week program where I will work with conductors in front of a live orchestra, as well as take classes and have private lessons. In August, I will attend the Lyceum Music Festival in Utah as a conducting student of Kayson Brown, a conductor with whom I’ve worked in festivals before and who I greatly respect. For next year at UW-Madison, I would also like to create and conduct another student ensemble. I hope that this will be a continuing tradition, as it’s a wonderful opportunity for students interested in conducting to learn and receive feedback.”


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

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Concerto Winners on stage March 18; Meet Satoko Hayami from “Sound Out Loud”; Jazz Orchestra 50th anniversary podcast

March 2, 2018

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music

University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/


“Symphony Showcase” Coming Soon!

Sunday,  March 18, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall

We’ve announced this before, but here’s a reminder: Our annual concerto winners solo recital (a/k/a Symphony Showcase”) takes place at 7:30 PM on March 18 in Mills Hall.

Our 2018 winners are Kaleigh Acord, violin (Beethoven, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, first movement); Aaron Gochberg, percussion (Keiko Abe, Prism Rhapsody); Eleni Katz, bassoon (Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in B flat major); Eric Tran, piano (Bach, Concerto No. 4 in A Major); and Mengmeng Wang, composer (premiere: “Blooming”).

Tickets are only $10 for adults, free to students, and there’s a free reception after the show in Mills Hall. Buy tickets here or at the door.


Meet Satoko Hayami, graduate pianist

Satoko, a doctoral student in Professor Martha Fischer‘s studio,  is a member of Sound Out Loud, a recent winner of The American Prize.  Here’s an excerpt from our recent Q&A with Satoko:
“The idea of starting a contemporary chamber music ensemble came to me in searching for ways to better connect with more diverse audiences. I felt that the diverse musical language in contemporary repertoire might have as much or even more potential to be relevant to the different kinds of audiences including young people and non-classical music fans than older repertoire, if presented in appropriate ways. I wanted to team up with people who are open to different, sometimes unconventional ways to present music, and was lucky to find people who share the similar interests, openness and enthusiasm right away.”

Read more here.
Satoko Hayami


James Latimer wins award

Emeritus Professor of Percussion James Latimer won a Lifetime Achievement Award at annual Wisconsin Days of Percussion event, January 27, 2018 in Milwaukee. While at UW-Madison, Latimer spearheaded a Duke Ellington Festival, started the Madison Marimba Quartet, initiated the first of 300 Young Audience Concerts held in public schools from 1969 to 1984, and hosted the Wisconsin Percussive Arts Society “Days of Percussion.”


Shain Woodwind/Piano Duo winners concert

3:30 pm, Sunday, March 4,  Morphy Hall

A competition and recital sponsored by former UW-Madison Chancellor Irving Shain
Winners were announced on Tuesday, February 27. They include: Juliana Mesa-Jaramillo, bassoon and Satoko Hayami, piano;
Anna Fisher-Roberts, flute and Eric Tran, piano.

Read more here.

Local arts reviewers loved “La Boheme”

University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Foreground, left to right: Claire Powling (Musetta), Michael Kelley (Waiter), Jake Elfner (Alcindoro) Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
“University Opera’s “La Bohème” proves a complete success on all counts – from the staging and the costumes to the singing and the orchestra”
Larry Wells, The Well-Tempered Ear, Feb. 27.

“Ronis’ able hand was evident in the players’ acting. The cast was consistently believable, and consequently I was drawn into their world and suffered along with their despair over love’s inconsistencies and death’s sting. Using my acid test for a performance’s success, I never glanced at my watch either night. I was fully engaged.

“The orchestra was a marvel. Conductor Chad Hutchinson let it soar when it was appropriate, but the orchestra never overshadowed the singers. In fact, the key term that kept occurring to me both evenings was balance. The acting, the back-and-forth between the singers, and the interplay between the orchestra and the singers were consistently evenhanded.

“As for the singers, the primary roles were double cast. Friday’s Mimi was Shaddai Solidum whose first aria “Mi chiamano Mimi” was a lesson in the mastery of legato. Saturday’s Mimi was Yanzelmalee Rivera who possesses a bell-like voice of remarkable agility.”

Read the entire review here.
Yanzelmalee Rivera as Mimi in University Opera’s production of LA BOHEME. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
University Opera Offers a Gem in a Bejewelled Setting
Greg Hettsmanberger, What Greg Says, 2.27.18

“Again we have been given much to look forward to; certainly it is unrealistic to see University Opera in Shannon Hall every season, but we can hope that it becomes a semi-regular occurrence. The greater lesson from Sunday’s performance however is this: wherever Ronis and his “kids” show up, the audience is in store for some memorable opera. The national awards and recognition that the program are consistently earning are richly deserved, and our town is clearly the richer for what these folks are giving us.”

Read the full review here.

Johannes Wallmann and Jazz at UW-Madison

“Bucky’s Jazz Savior,”  Madison Magazine, February 2018

“It was that combination of vision, leadership and expertise as a pianist and composer that quickly pushed him to the top of UW–Madison’s list of candidates for director of jazz studies. During [Director of Jazz Studies Johannes] Wallmann’s first year of teaching here, in 2012-2013, he sought out and performed with many local jazz musicians as a means of building relationships and moving the music program forward.

“In less than five years, Wallmann took the Jazz Studies undergraduate program from zero enrollees to 17. It’s an important part of the efforts to revitalize Madison’s jazz community.”

Read the story here.

Announcement: The UW Jazz Orchestra is turning 50! April’s annual Jazz Fest will celebrate this anniversary with three concerts featuring guest trumpeter Marquis Hill, winner of the 2014 Thelonious Monk Competition. Learn about the history of the Jazz Orchestra with our new six-episode podcasts with Les Thimmig, longtime composer and saxophonist. Listen to Episode 1 on our SoundCloud channel.


The American Prize first-place vocal winner coming to Madison on March 19 & 20

Vocalist Kristina Bachrach, recent winner of The American Prize in Vocal Performance and the Friedrich and Virginia Schorr Memorial Award, will perform a concert on March 20 at 7:00 PM in Music Hall. Accompanied by faculty pianist Daniel Fung, she’ll sing selections from “The Recovered Voices Initiative,” started by James Conlon and Los Angeles Opera, which focuses on musical works and musicians that were either suppressed or killed by the Nazi regime in World War II.

Kristina Bachrach
Read about Kristina, the Initiative, and The American Prize at this link.

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

“La Bohème” in Shannon Hall – “Sound Out Loud” wins first prize – “Schubertiade” on Jan. 28

January 11, 2018

Welcome to 2018!!!!

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

University Opera to stage “La Bohème” at Memorial Union’s Shannon Hall

University Opera takes over the Wisconsin Union Theater for a three-day run of Puccini’s masterpiece

Read full news release here.

On February 23, 24 and 25, University Opera, in collaboration with the Wisconsin Union Theater, will present a special production of Giacomo Puccini’s timeless masterpiece, La Bohème, at the Wisconsin Union Theater’s Shannon Hall. This marks the first time in over 15 years that University Opera has staged a production at the Union Theater and the first bona fide opera production in the space since the theater’s renovation in 2014. Conducted by interim UW-Madison Director of Orchestras, Chad Hutchinson, and directed by Karen K. Bishop Director of Opera, David Ronis, the production will be performed in Italian with English supertitles. It will take full advantage of the many upgrades to Shannon Hall, in particular, the expanded orchestra pit which will accommodate the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra.

Friday, Feb. 23 @ 7:30 PM
Saturday, Feb. 24 @ 7:30 PM
Sunday, Feb. 25 @3:00 PM

Tickets are $38 for premium seating, $30 general admission, $25 senior tickets, $15 non-UW-Madison students and $10 UW-Madison students and are available in advance through the Campus Arts Ticketing office at (608) 265-ARTS and online at https://union.wisc.edu/events-and-activities/event-calendar/event/la-boheme/. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the Wisconsin Union Theater Box Office Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and Saturdays, 12:00-5:00 p.m.

Because shows often sell out, advance purchase is recommended. If unsold tickets remain, they may be purchased at the door beginning one hour before the performance.

Says longtime University Opera supporter Kathleen Harker: “I am excited to see opera return to Shannon Hall at the Union with the University Opera’s lavish production of Puccini’s La Bohème. I have fond memories of seeing my first opera, a touring Metropolitan Opera production of ‘Madama Butterfly,’ at the Memorial Union in 1965.”



Above: Maria Callas sings “Quando me’n vo” from La Bohème, 1958


Sound Out Loud Ensemble wins first prize in national competition

The School of Music congratulates the Sound Out Loud Ensemble for its first place award from The American Prize in chamber music performance, university division. Sound Out Loud! is a new music ensemble currently comprised of pianists Kyle Dee Johnson and Satoko Hayami, violinist Biffa Kwok, flutist Iva Ugrčić, clarinetist Pedro Garcia III, and composer/cellist Brian Grimm. All but Grimm are either former or current graduate students at UW-Madison.

Sound Out Loud. L-R: Biffa Kwok, Iva Ugrčić, Satoko Hayami, Brian Grimm, Kyle Johnson and Pedro Garcia III.

The group specializes in contemporary music from the early 20th century to the present, as well as commissions new works to be written for it. Having drawn inspiration from numerous performance ensembles (such as Eighth Blackbird, Silk Road, and the International Contemporary Ensemble), the group seeks to expand the realm of possibilities within the chamber ensemble repertoire through the implementation of experimental techniques, the incorporation of a variety of instruments and musical styles from the Middle East and Asia, innovative performance practice, and the use of live electronics.

The American Prize is a series of new, non-profit national competitions in the performing arts providing cash awards, professional adjudication and regional, national and international recognition for the best recorded performances by ensembles and individuals each year in the United States at the professional, college/university, church, community and secondary school levels. Administered by Hat City Music Theater, Inc., a nonprofit organization based in Danbury, Connecticut, The American Prize was founded in 2009 and is awarded annually. The competitions of The American Prize are open to all U.S. citizens, whether living in this country or abroad, and to others currently living, working and/or studying in the United States of America, its protectorates and territories.


Our Annual “Schubertiade” only three weeks off!

This year’s Schubertiade will present at least one work from each year of Schubert’s all-too-brief but brilliant career. Beginning with one of his earliest piano duets, written when he was 14 years old, and ending with songs from his final year, this 5th Annual Schubertiade at the Mead-Witter School of Music will take place on Sunday afternoon, January 28, 2018 at 3pm in Mills Concert Hall.  All are invited for a post-concert reception in the University Club.

Once again, pianists Martha Fischer and Bill Lutes will be joined by School of Music faculty, students, and guest mezzo-soprano Rachel Wood, professor of voice at UW-Whitewater. Ms. Wood is a mezzo soprano whose performance credits include opera roles in Europe with Accademia Europea dell’Opera in Lucca, Italy and with Opera Studio Nederland, as well as numerous appearances in opera and recital in the US and Canada.

Rachel Wood

Tickets: $15/$5 students. Free to Mead Witter music majors, staff and faculty.

Ticket information here.


Please check our concert calendar for many other noteworthy upcoming events!

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor..


And the concerto winners are: A bassoonist, a pianist, a violinist, a percussionist, and a composer

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
455 North Park Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706
http://www.music.wisc.edu/

January 3, 2018

Winners to perform solo on Sunday, March 18, 7:30 PM

They isolated themselves in practice rooms for months, and their efforts paid off.

Chad Hutchinson rehearses the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.
The School of Music is pleased to announce the winners of the 2017-2018 concerto competition:

Bassoonist Eleni Katz will play Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191 with the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Chad Hutchinson. Eleni, a student of Professor Marc Vallon, graduates this spring with a bachelor’s of music degree in bassoon performance. Eleni’s win marks the first time in 20 years that a bassoonist has won the concerto competition.

She will join three other soloists on stage: Kaleigh Acord, violin, a doctoral student of Professor Soh-Hyun Altino; Aaron Gochberg, percussion, an undergraduate student of Professor Anthony Di Sanza; and Eric Tran, piano, a doctoral student of Professor Christopher Taylor.

In addition, the winner of the composition competition, doctoral student Mengmeng Wang, will have her work, “Blooming,” premiered by the symphony. Mengmeng studies with Professors Laura Schwendinger (composition) and Daniel Grabois (electronic music) of the School of Music and Professor Joseph Koykkar (composition) of the Dance Department.

The program will open with Leonard Bernstein’s Overture to Candide. “A dashing overture in … a shapely sonata form with points of canonic imitation and a sparkling Rossini crescendo to close.” —  John Henken.

The School of Music’s annual “Symphony Showcase” concert is a perennial crowd-pleaser that combines the joy of youthful accomplishment with the beauty of live music. The community is invited to attend and remain afterwards for a free reception in the lobby of Mills Hall. We will see you on March 18!

$10 adults, free to all students and children.

Ticket information here.


Kaleigh Acord, violin

Beethoven, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, Op. 61, movement 1

Kaleigh Acord. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Violinist Kaleigh Acord hails from Fairfax Station, Virginia and is now pursuing a doctorate of musical arts at University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Mead Witter School of Music. There, she is a student of Soh-Hyun Park Altino and a recipient of the Paul Collins Fellowship. She holds a graduate performance diploma from the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, as well as a master’s of music and an undergraduate diploma from the Longy School of Music of Bard College in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her previous teachers include Violaine Melancon and Laura Bossert. At Longy, Kaleigh served three years as Ms. Bossert’s teaching assistant, and received both the Margaret Rohde Award for Excellence in Solfege and Theoretical Studies, and the Roman Totenberg Award for Highest Academic and Artistic Achievement. An avid chamber musician, Kaleigh has spent her summers at music festivals including Bowdoin International Music Festival, Kent/Blossom Music, the Garth Newel Chamber Music Fellowship Program, Lyricafest, and the Charles Castleman’s Quartet Program. She made her solo radio debut on WQXR’s McGraw Hill Financial Young Artist Showcase in March 2014.

Aaron Gochberg, percussion

Keiko Abe, Prism Rhapsody

Percussionist Aaron Gochberg, an Oregon, Wisconsin native, is completing his fourth year of undergraduate study under Professor Anthony Di Sanza, a program which has presented him with opportunities to perform in Carnegie Hall, the Overture Center, and the Wisconsin Union Theater’s Shannon Hall, as well as to tour Beijing and Shenyang, China. In 2016, Aaron was a Performance Fellow at the nief-norf Summer Festival, where he performed, premiered, and recorded numerous works by both new and established composers. He has collaborated with artists and ensembles such as Sō Percussion, Clocks in Motion, Sound out Loud, Juan de Marcos Gonzalez, Acoplados Latin Jazz Project, the Wisconsin Collegiate All Star Percussion Ensemble, and he continues to seek shared experiences with performers from around the world.

Aaron Gochberg

Aaron has enjoyed an eclectic range of musical experiences, giving him a distinct perspective on percussive artistry. He is a collaborator at heart, and is deeply invested in working directly with living composers. His interest in Afro-Cuban music has granted him multiple opportunities to travel to Cuba, where he has been fortunate to study with some of the most influential musicians on the island, including Mario “Aspirina” Jagerui, Alejandro Carvajal Guerra, Marino Angarica, Luis Cancino Morales, Dolores Perez, and Maximino Duquesne. In 2017, the University recognized Aaron’s study of Afro-Cuban Batá drumming traditions by awarding him a Hilldale Undergraduate Research Fellowship. Recently, he joined the Wisconsin Union Theater as the World Music Coordinator on the Performing Arts Committee.

Growing up in Oregon, Aaron was very fortunate to participate in a musical community, granting him many formative experiences. He would like to thank Lynn Callendar, a member of the School of Music Board of Visitors, for her gracious support over the past four years. He would also like to sincerely thank his many private and collegiate music teachers, who have included Dr. Anthony Di Sanza, Dr. Todd Hammes, Tom Ross, Donald Skoog, and David Skogen.

Eleni Katz, bassoon

Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in B flat major, K. 191

Iowa City native Eleni Katz will graduate this spring with a bachelor’s of music in bassoon performance, where she studies with Professor Marc Vallon. While in high school, Eleni studied with University of Iowa Professor Benjamin Coelho, who sparked a new level of passion for the instrument. Her experience at the Interlochen Bassoon Institute was the pivotal moment when she decided to pursue a career in music.

Eleni Katz

Eleni has always loved the art of performance and is particularly excited to play W.A. Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto in B Flat K.191, because this is the first time in 20 years that a bassoonist has won the university’s concerto competition. This bassoon concerto is arguably the most important concerto in the bassoon’s repertoire, highlighting the instrument’s range, articulation, and refinement.

Eleni was a runner-up in the Marquette Symphony Orchestra Young Artist Concerto Competition and was a winner of the Irving Shain Piano-Woodwind Competition and the University of Iowa Double Reed Day Concerto Competition.

Under Professor Marc Vallon’s tutelage, Eleni has had six solo recitals participated in both the IMANI Winds and Madeline Island Chamber Music Festivals, and the Brevard Music Center and Chautauqua Institution Summer Music Festivals.

She plans to attend graduate school in bassoon performance next year. Her future goal is to gain experience in performance by playing in a symphony orchestra and chamber music groups. Her long-term goal is to teach bassoon at the university level and to lead a vibrant bassoon studio of her own.

Eleni would like to thank her friends and family, bassoon studio, and professors, who have inspired and supported her throughout her musical journey. Lastly, Eleni would like to thank Professor Vallon for every lesson and for always helping her find new ways to improve her performance of this concerto. Tonight’s performance is the “cherry on the cake” of an incredible, transformative four years of study at UW-Madison.

Eric Tran, piano

Bach, Concerto No. 4 in A Major, BWV 1055

Pianist-composer Eric Tran, originally from Piedmont, California, is pursuing a doctorate of musical arts in piano at UW-Madison with Christopher Taylor. He is known for his friendly stage manner, thoughtful programming, and bold risk-taking. He has appeared in music festivals such as PianoTexas, Aspen, Art of the Piano, as well as festivals in Europe. His principal studies were with pianists Sharon Mann, Thomas Schultz, and composer Jaroslaw Kapuscinski.

Eric Tran

Eric is a graduate of Stanford University and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. During his studies, he was the winner of the concerto competitions of both institutions, and he was awarded the prestigious Robert M. Golden Medal for outstanding contributions to the arts. As a composer, he won the Pacific Musical Society Composition Prize, and his sets of children’s music have been programmed for over six years on the syllabus of the US Open Music Competition. His music has been performed by the St. Lawrence String Quartet, the Friction Quartet, his generous friends, and his charming piano students.

​Eric also comprises one half of the notorious “Happy Dog” piano duo, with his piano partner, Nathan Cheung. They won both first prize and the Abild American Music Award at the 2017 Ellis Duo-Piano Competition, hosted by the National Federation of Music Clubs. For over a decade, they have performed four-hands originals, transcriptions, and classics alike with a focus on bringing humor and joy to the classical music world.

Mengmeng Wang, composer

“Blooming”

Mengmeng Wang

Mengmeng Wang, a native of China, is a doctoral student studying composition with Professor Laura Schwendinger and electro-acoustic music with Professors Daniel Grabois (School of Music) and Joseph Koykkar (Dance Department). She received her master’s degree in music in composition from Shanghai Conservatory of Music, studying with Professor Liang Zhao. She also studied composition with Professors Guang Zhao and Heng-lu Yao.

Her works have been performed in the Beijing Modern Music Festival, in a recital by German violist Christiane Edinger and also by the Shanghai Opera Symphony Orchestra. Her film music was awarded the Honor Award of 1st eARTS Digital Audio China Competition in Shanghai, 2010; one of her art songs was awarded a golden prize at the 4th Chinese National Music Exhibition and Performance in Beijing in 2014; and she won the composition competition of Xinghai Conservatory of Music for one of her chamber music works. She was also named a “top-notch talent” of Chinese popular music by the China Association of Popular Music.

Program Note – “Blooming”
Blooming was inspired by flowers selected by Professor Schwendinger. “Blooming” is the language of flowers; I feel that they are trying to say something to me. I used different types of musical language to describe them. There are also important themes presented in bright metallic timbres and textures which express the flowers’ quiet glory as they bloom, and then a peaceful fading away.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August. To receive the brochure, please send your postal address to newsletter editor.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Meet New Faculty: Chad Hutchinson, conductor

Chad Hutchinson, a native of Iowa, came to Wisconsin as adjunct professor to conduct both the UW-Madison Symphony and University Opera Orchestras. Prior to his appointment here, he was assistant conductor of the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra and director of the South Dakota Symphony Youth Orchestras, and has also conducted in Minnesota, Iowa, and Williamsville, New York. Prof. Hutchinson holds conducting degrees from the University of Minnesota and Bowling Green State University and a bachelor’s degree in music education from Morningside College. Read Chad’s full biography here. His commitment to outreach and the performance of new music is strong, and he has been recognized for his opera conducting skills with a third-place award in the American Prize in Opera Conducting.

Conductor Chad Hutchinson in rehearsal with the UW-Madison Symphony Orchestra. Photograph by Michael R. Anderson.

Interview conducted by Kyle Johnson, a dissertator in piano performance.


When you go to the Coasts, what questions do people ask you about the Midwest, and how do you answer?

When traveling outside the Midwest, when I say that I live in South Dakota people automatically assume that I live in a small town and don’t have access to resources. Sioux Falls has 175,000 people and I feel that it is my job to educate others that the Midwest has both rural and urban areas.

Having lived in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio and South Dakota, truthfully they are all quite similar.  The generosity and genuine care for others is something that sets people apart in this part of the country.  The biggest difference living in South Dakota is that the state itself has a small population, so no matter where you are in the state the degree of separation is much less.  Also, my wife always has told me that the beauty of the prairie will grow on me.  There is a sense of calm that one experiences when being able to see the sunset to the west for many miles.

Concert audiences here can expect to hear the programming of both old and new music. How do you choose the newer works? 

Exposing students and audience members alike to new music is a core value of my educational philosophy.  I try to select repertoire by composers who are getting a lot of recognition and being performed regularly across the country in professional orchestras, or are composers that I feel are under-represented.  This season we  performed works of Mason Bates and Christopher Theofanidis on our first two concerts, and will feature Caroline Shaw and Stephen Shewan on concerts in the spring.  Many of these works have never been performed in Madison or the state of Wisconsin, so it is very exciting to bring something fresh and invigorating to the area.  The “Composer’s Datebook” segment on National Public Radio always says that “All music was once new,” which is true.  I feel that if we only perform works that have been vetted in classical music we will miss out on exciting new opportunities.  As an assistant with the South Dakota Symphony, I learned from Maestro Delta David Gier as he programmed living composers on nearly every subscription concert during his tenure with the orchestra.  There has been a transformation in the audience’s and orchestra’s reaction to new music there and I hope to make the same type of footprint here.  The School of Music at UW-Madison has so many applied faculty with experience in these endeavors that it has been a joy to have so much support from others with our selections of new music.

The “Composer’s Datebook” segment on National Public Radio always says that “All music was once new,” which is true.  I feel that if we only perform works that have been vetted in classical music we will miss out on exciting new opportunities.

After a helping of Babcock ice cream last summer, Chad Hutchinson’s daughters Lauren, 4 and Julia, 7, take a spin on the famous Terrace chair.

Share one memorable and one embarrassing musical experience.

When I was 20, I traveled to Spain, France and England as part of a college choir tour.  On successive nights in London, I saw the Philadelphia Orchestra on tour perform Wagner’s  Die Meistersinger and Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite.  For a young kid from Iowa, this was life-changing and made me realize the power of opera as well as the possibilities of color and dynamics within a professional orchestra.  I am always taken aback not by the loud playing of the great professional orchestras, but the control of soft dynamics.

My embarrassing moment came in Europe a few years later when doing a conducting workshop in the Czech Republic. As a college baseball player, I always would represent the number 2 as the index finger and pinky finger.  I got on the podium and said in my broken Czech, “Second movement please,” while holding up two fingers.  Pretty soon the entire orchestra is laughing and doing the same back to me.  I came to realize that in the Czech culture this is the equivalent of our middle finger gesture.  The orchestra liked “giving the finger(s)” to the young conductor.

What is different about conducting today vs. 30 years ago?

I think that the dictatorial days of the conductors of the past seems to have shifted quite a bit in recent years to a more level playing field with musicians.  Social media has changed the professional landscape with marketing campaigns for the top conductors of the major orchestras.  However, at the end of the day, the joy of collaborating with great musicians on amazing works of art is still the same today as it was 30 years ago.

Chad and Karen Hutchinson at the Wisconsin-Iowa football game.

You’ve been involved in quite a few unique events. Are there any that you would like to replicate here?

I spent the past year and a half working on a ballet project in South Dakota with four local companies and our youth orchestra.  I accepted this position [in Madison] before getting to the performance of the project, but I am happy to say that my successor is going through with the concert.  In this project, each company received a different composer – Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Copland and Gershwin – and the goal was to trace some of the evolution of the dance medium as well as giving the orchestra and dancers an opportunity to perform live with each other.  I hope to collaborate with the dance department on a project in the future as I feel that the more we work together in all the arts, the better.

Where were you guest conducting recently?

I have been in many high schools recently in South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin recruiting first and foremost.  I also recently conducted the Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphony  and just returned from doing a High School Area All-State Festival in New York.

Your wife and family visited Madison this fall for the Badgers-Iowa football game. Did your family enjoy it (even though Iowa lost)?
I will admit that being a die-hard lifelong Iowa fan has been a bit difficult in recent years, both by getting my graduate degree from the University of Minnesota and now working here at UW-Madison. However, I root for the Badgers when they are not playing the Hawkeyes.  I had high hopes for the Iowa-Wisconsin game as it started so well for the Hawks, but the tides quickly turned and the Badgers had a great day. This being said, even though the Hawkeyes lost, the atmosphere at Camp Randall stadium was amazing and a lot of fun to be a part of.  Karen and I also took our kids to the Badger men’s and women’s basketball games, where they were super excited to meet Bucky Badger.


Professor Hutchinson will next conduct these performances:
University Opera presents La Bohème, February 23, 24 and 25 at the Memorial Union’s Shannon Hall, David Ronis directing.

Symphony Showcase, a concert featuring our concerto competition winners, March 18, Mills Hall.

News of Students, Graduation Celebration & Details of Final Concerts

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
April 25, 2017

Note: On Friday, May 12, from 2 to 4 PM, the School of Music will host an Awards & Graduation Celebration in Music Hall, the clock tower across from Humanities at the bottom of Bascom Hill. Join us for festivities, conversation, congratulations, and food!

Student accolades are rolling in!

Wisconsin native Jerod Reetz, a doctoral student in composition studying with now-retired professor Stephen Dembski, has received a commission to write a work for low flutes. Low flutes include the following instruments: alto flute, bass flute, contrabass flute, subcontrabass flute, and hyperbass flute.

Jerod Reetz

The $250 commission is the 2017 Peter Sheridan Low Flutes Opportunity Award, awarded by the Madison Flute Club during the Wisconsin Flute Festival in early March.


Bassoonist Ranveer Vasdev has been awarded the Leo and Jean Besozzi Scholarship, which provides a one-time, $1,500 award to a high achieving senior. In addition to pursuing his music degree, Ranveer is also currently doing research with the Department of Comparative  Bioscience. In early spring 2015 Ranveer was invited to play at an international wind band festival at Carnegie Hall. He also hopes to attain a MD/PhD practicing pediatric pulmonology and researching diaphragmatic and intercostal neuroplasticity.


Saxophonist Rachel Heuer has won the Ann Durra Scholarship from the College of Letters & Sciences. This scholarship provides a one-time, $3,000 award to a high achieving junior or senior pursuing a degree in mathematics, the physical sciences, or the natural sciences. In addition to pursuing her music degree in jazz performance, Rachel is also pursuing a degree in molecular biology. She has played self-composed original pieces at Jazz at Five weekly concerts on Capitol Square. She also works in a lab on campus studying heart disease.


Percussionist Aaron Gochberg has won a Hilldale Undergraduate Research Award for his past and continued research into Cuban music and folklore.


Will Porter

Doctoral trombonist Will Porter, a student of Mark Hetzler, has won a $10,000 dissertation fellowship from the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. Porter is one of two UW-Madison doctoral candidates to win the award, and they are two of only ten winners in the United States.

Porter’s project is focused on music education in Mozambique. His doctoral research examines the relationship between classical-music education and social development. It focuses on the Xiquitsi (“Shi-keet-see”) Project in Mozambique, an emergent classical-music education and outreach project inspired by the El Sistema orchestral training program in Venezuela.


Weekend on Tap: Some Ticketed, Some Free

UW Wind Ensemble, Student Recitals, Concert Band, and a Quartet Performance round out the year. See http://www.music.wisc.edu/events/

See below for ticketing information.

Concert Choir with cellist Matt Haimovitz, violist Sally Chisholm and student soloists

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Mills Hall
Beverly Taylor, conductor
$15 adults, $5 non-SOM students

Read the Isthmus preview by Jay Rath.

Conductor Beverly Taylor’s vision for this concert is “Art Born of Tragedy.” It includes the work Après moi, le deluge, a lament on the destruction of New Orleans in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina, with cellist Matt Haimovitz, and a work, on Paris, by faculty composer Laura Schwendinger about the 2015 bombings in Paris, with viola soloist Sally Chisholm. In addition are works by Robert Fountain, John Wilbye, Joseph Gregorio, as well as several spirituals. The Concert Choir is one of UW-Madison’s most advanced ensembles, and released a CD in 2016.

Beverly Taylor writes:
“To our listeners,
I’ve been thinking about this program for a long time.  In tragic circumstances, such as we’ve experienced in our lifetimes, and certainly in the last twenty years, many of us are caught in a web of grief and frustration.  Our need to be of help may come out in works of social justice or aid, or volunteerism.  But for many of us we also may feel that the circumstances of the event are so overwhelming that we may withdraw inside, unable to wrap our minds around a pathway to follow; we may grow a shell of busy-ness that keeps us from feeling both joy and sorrow.
“After 9/11, the Onion came out with an issue; I told one of my grad students at the time that nothing funny could follow such an incident, so I was unready to read the article he handed me.  But on some deep and ridiculous level the headline stayed with me:  Woman, not knowing what else to do, bakes flag cake.
“So we come to what artists may do in the wake of tragedies—large public tragedies and ones kept inside of us.  Artists may not bake a flag cake, but they turn their strong feelings and ideas into works that may plumb the sorrow, turn the sorrow into an idea, turn an idea into action, or make us view any tragedy in a new way.  Musical artists cannot necessarily predict the emotional or intellectual effects on the listeners; they can only present their ideas in sound, which are interpreted by the performers.
“And being the very mortal beings we are, it is hard to keep our contemplation centered on these ideas for long, as they are potent, so tonight we vary our content with music of several centuries, varying the gentle and the loud, early music with modern spirituals of overcoming adversity, works written long ago with those written this year, in the hope of bringing a fresh look and sound to profound ideas. Thank you for coming on this musical journey with us.”

Download the program here.

Matt Haimovitz will visit host Norman Gilliland on “The Midday,” Wisconsin Public Radio, this Thursday, April 27, at noon. 88.7 FM.


UW Jazz Week with bassist Linda Oh, the UW High School Honors Jazz Band, and the UW Jazz Orchestra

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Music Hall
Johannes Wallmann, director
$15 adults, $5 non-SOM students.
Additional concerts Tuesday, April 25 & Thursday, April 27

Fresh off first place in the Big Band category at the Eau Claire Jazz Festival, the UW Jazz Orchestra is ready to swing to the music of Oliver Nelson, Clay Jenkins, Cedar Walton, Dave Douglas and Pat Metheny. The Honors Jazz Band plans to perform works by Kenny Wheeler, Jeff Jarvis, and Frederick “Dave” Snider.

Meanwhile, by happy coincidence, bassist Linda Oh is on the cover of April’s Jazz Times magazine. Oh is now appearing regularly with jazz guitarist Pat Metheny. “Linda is exactly right for me right now,” Metheny says. “because she embodies the kind of listening that I always love, but that I am particularly looking for at the moment. Simply, put, she is one of the most exciting new musicians I have heard in a long time on her instrument.”

Download the program here.

Linda Oh will appear on WORT Radio this Thursday, April 27, 3 PM, on the “Strictly Jazz” show with host Steven Braunginn.


Choral Union & UW Symphony – Two Concerts

Saturday, April 29 8 PM, Mills Hall
Sunday, April 30, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall
Beverly Taylor, conductor
Tickets: $15 adults, $8 students.

Presenting Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d (text by Walt Whitman).

A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois.  The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington.  The work is in memory of “those we loved.”

Our soloists will be Jennifer D’Agostino, soprano, and James Held, baritone.

Jennifer D’Agostino is currently assistant professor of music in voice at Walsh University in Canton, Ohio. She received her DMA at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in voice performance with a minor in opera production.

Jennifer has performed major operatic roles in The Magic FluteSusannahA Hand of BridgeSweeney ToddRoman FeverThe Mikado, Little WomenThe Most Happy Fella’, Maria Stuarda, and The Consul. She directed & premiered the role of ‘Ethyl Wormvarnish’ in Jerry Hui’s opera Wired for Love.

Internationally, Jennifer has performed as a soloist in Rossini’s Messa di Gloria in Pesaro, Italy with Benton Hess and under the baton of Eduoardo Mueller at AIMS in Graz, Austria.

She has been a participant, soloist and instructor with the Madison Early Music Festival. In 2012, she collaborated with pianist and UW grad Kirstin Ihde at the Baldwin-Wallace Art Song Festival. Jennifer was chosen as a NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing) Intern, summer 2013. She presented at the Lily Conference in 2016 on teaching techniques in the private vocal lesson.

James Held is a versatile performer with experience in a variety of styles including musical theatre, new works, and traditional concert and operatic repertoire. Recent performances include King Henry VIII and Jesus the Beloved in Passion Trilogy with The Fisher Ensemble, Oliver Hix in Meredith Willson’s The Music Man and The Sacristan in Tosca with the Colorado Symphony, Sheriff Wells in Zach Redler’s A Song for Susan Smith, Guglielmo in Così fan tutte, The Pirate King in The Pirates of Penzance, and The Father in Hänsel und Gretel. Held was a Young Artist with the prestigious Seagle Music Colony where he performed such roles as Sid in Albert Herring and Leporello in Don Giovanni. He is currently the baritone studio artist with Madison Opera where he appeared as the Second Priest/Second Armored Man in Die Zauberflöte and Paris in Roméo et Juliette. Held holds a master of music degree from the University of Colorado-Boulder and a bachelor of music degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He will be joining the Madison Symphony Chorus in Germany as the baritone soloist in Brahms’s Ein Deutsches Requiem.

Ticket information:

By Phone:
(608) 265-ARTS (2787)
By Mail:
Campus Arts Ticketing Box Office
800 Langdon Street
Madison, WI 53706
In person:
Box Office in Memorial Union, First Floor, 800 Langdon St
Box Office in Vilas Hall: 821 University Avenue, East Campus Mall side of the building.
Online: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/UWIM/?prod=UWCA

Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.

Take your pick: School of Music overflowing all April with beautiful noise

News and Events from the Mead Witter School of Music
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wednesday, April 5, 2017

For this issue, we’ve prepared a special e-blast of selected final concerts at the School of Music. Many more, including student recitals and small ensemble concerts, can be found on our events calendar.

We hope you will make time to attend at least one!  (Click links to read musician biographies and learn about concert programs.)

The Perlman Trio holds its annual recital

Saturday, April 8, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The trio, comprised of Chan Mi Jean, piano; Adam Dorn, violin; and Micah Cheng, cello, is sponsored by longtime donor Kato Perlman. The ensemble is chosen carefully to blend personalities and styles, and each spring concert is a treat for audiences. This year’s trio will present works of Haydn, Dvorak, and Brahms. There will be a reception after the concert.

The 2016-2017 Perlman Trio: Micah Cheng, viola; Chan Mi Jean, piano; and Adam Dorn, violin. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

32nd Annual Beethoven Piano Competition winners recital

2017 Beethoven Competition winners Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 3:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
This long-running event is sponsored by former UW-Madison chancellor Irving Shain. The 2017 winners are Kangwoo Jin, Leah Kang, and Alberto Peña-Cortes. The program will include Beethoven’s Sonata in C Major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”) (Kangwoo Jin); the Sonata in E Major, Op. 109 (Leah Kang); and the Sonata in A Major, Op. 101 (Alberto Peña-Cortes).


UW Symphony Orchestra Farewell Concert with Conductor James Smith

James Smith rehearses the UW Symphony for its final concert with him as conductor. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

Sunday, April 9, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Professor James Smith, conductor of the UW Symphony and University Opera, came to UW-Madison in 1984 to conduct the Wind and Symphonic Ensembles and assumed orchestral conducting duties following the departure of David Becker. He has also served as longtime conductor of the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra and will retire from that post as well.
Smith was a professional clarinetist prior to becoming a conductor.


The Hunt Quartet presents a spring concert

The Hunt Quartet, 2016-2017. L-R: Kyle Price, cello.; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; Chang-En Lu, violin. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Tuesday, April 11, 8:30 PM, Morphy Hall. Free event.
The Hunt Quartet is the graduate string quartet at the School of Music, co-sponsored by Kato Perlman and the Madison Symphony Orchestra. The Quartet is an integral part of the Madison Symphony Orchestra’s “Up Close and Musical” program, visiting area schools to teach students about fundamentals of music and the string quartet. This year’s members are Kyle Price, cello; Vinicius “Vinny” Sant’Ana, violin; Blakeley Menghini, viola; and Chang-En Lu, violin.


Stephanie Jutt: Final Faculty Recital

Stephanie Jutt. Photograph by Katrin Talbot.

Thursday, April 13, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

Flutist Stephanie Jutt bids farewell after 27 years
While at UW-Madison, Professor Stephanie Jutt founded Bach Dancing & Dynamite, a summer chamber music festival; UW-Madison’s Arts Venture Challenge; and shepherded many flutists through undergraduate and graduate work. She plans to continue as principal flutist with the Madison Symphony Orchestra and as artistic director of Bach Dancing & Dynamite.


Emery Stephens: African-American Songs and Spirituals

(Rescheduled from March 13)
Wednesday, April 12, 6:30 PM, Music Hall.  Free event.
Emery Stephens, baritone, is assistant professor of voice at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Stephens will coach student singers and pianists in African-American songs and spirituals. Students will perform in a recital with Stephens and collaborative pianist professor Martha Fischer in a concert.


Pro Arte Quartet with guest artist Jazimina Macneil, mezzo-soprano

Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall. Free event.

The Pro Arte’s  final concert of the academic year will feature a rising star singer and a world premiere by composer John Harbison.

String Quartet in E Major, Op. 54 No. 3 (1788)
Joseph Haydn

The Cross of Snow for Contralto and String Quartet (2016)
John Harbison
World Premiere of Version for Voice and String Quartet

String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 16 (1874)
Antonín Dvořák


Annual Varsity Band Concerts with Mike Leckrone

Mike Leckrone at the Cotton Bowl, January 2017. Photograph by Gary Smith.

April 20, 21 and 22, Kohl Center, 601 Dayton Street. All shows 7 PM. $23. Buy tickets.
Help us welcome Mike Leckrone back from his recent surgery! Learn more here.


UW Wind Ensemble

Scott Teeple, conductor.
Wednesday, April 26, 7:30 PM, Mills Hall.   Free event.

Scott Teeple. Photograph by Katherine Esposito.

The Wind Ensemble offers a Wisconsin premiere of a work by Japanese composer Jun Nagao, and the Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble by Igor Stravinsky with Christopher Taylor on piano.

Guest bassist Linda Oh performs with Jazz Orchestra and UW High School Honors Jazz Band

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Music Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.
Additional events Tuesday -Thursday in Morphy Hall; click here for more information.
Johannes Wallmann, director

Our annual spring Jazz Fest features talented high school jazz musicians, who rehearse with the UW Jazz Orchestra and a guest. This year, our guest is bassist Linda Oh from New York City, who is featured on the cover of April’s Jazz Times magazine. Oh has played with many top musicians; she’ll appear with Pat Metheny at Ravinia on June 14. The week’s events include two free concerts and a ticketed concert on Friday night.

 


UW Concert Choir with cellist Matt Haimovitz

Friday, April 28, 8 PM, Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$5 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Presenting “Après moi, le deluge” by composer Luna Pearl Woolf
and “for Paris,” a world premiere for solo viola and choir by UW-Madison composer Laura Schwendinger.

With the Concert Choir and Sally Chisholm, violist of the Pro Arte Quartet.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

“Ferociously talented” (New York Times) cellist Matt Haimovitz, known for his renditions of the Bach Cello Suites as well as Radiohead, will return to Madison on April 28 to perform a work that he premiered here 11 years ago with the UW Concert Choir, one of UW-Madison’s most advanced choirs.

Read full news release here.

Watch: Matt Haimovitz & Christopher O’Riley: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert, 2015


UW Choral Union & UW Symphony Orchestra

Saturday, April 29 (8 PM) and Sunday, April 30 (7:30 PM), Mills Hall.

$15 adults/$8 students. Buy tickets online; also sold at door.

Beverly Taylor, conductor

Presenting Paul Hindemith’s When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom’d (text by Walt Whitman).

A rarely done work because of its difficulty, this is an outstanding setting of Walt Whitman’s poem written about the death of Abraham Lincoln, and the train that carried his body to Springfield, Illinois. The work was commissioned by Robert Shaw in memory of Franklin Roosevelt, whose funeral train carried his dead body from Georgia back to Washington. The work is in memory of “those we loved.”

Below: The New York Philharmonic performed this work in 1946.


Our Full Concert Calendar

calendar

The School of Music offers a smorgasbord of performances each year; we invite you to visit our website and click on our events calendar. We also publish a season brochure that is mailed every August.


You received this newsletter because you either signed up at join-somnews@lists.wisc.edu or directly at this blog. You can also follow us on our very active Facebook page and hear our music on our SoundCloud page.